White Plains Rural Cemetery Office, White Plains

Photograph by Gray Williams

Historic Properties Listing

PropertyAmawalk Friends Meeting House
MunicipalityYorktown
Community
Street Number2467
Street AddressQuaker Church Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  08/02/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  11/16/89
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  10/06/89
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerAmawalk Monthly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionDeteriorated
NeighborhoodRural
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1831
Structural SystemWood Frame, Interlocking Joints
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsThe meeting house has undergone minor alterations such as the addition of the cloakroom (mid-19th century), to which a window was added on the south side in the 1970s. Originally covered with wooden shingles, the building is now painted an off white with New England red trim.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Amawalk Friends Quaker Meeting House is architecturally and historically significant as a representative example of vernacular religious architecture associated with the development of the Quaker religious movement in Westchester County. The building embodies the distinctive characteristics of a fully developed Quaker meeting house, including two-story rectangular frame construction, two separate entrances on the principal façade, large first floor meeting space with centrally directed benches, and an interior second-story gallery. The overall simplicity and plainness apparent in the building's design and ornamentation, and the quality of materials and superior craftsmanship evident in its construction, are also representative of the Quaker building tradition. The meeting house is historically significant as a tangible symbol of the Society of Friends. The context of the intact Amawalk meeting house is enhanced by the existence of a small Quaker cemetery located nearby. The meeting house has been in continuous use from the early 19th century to the present.
DescriptionThe Amawalk Friends Meeting House (1831) is located in a rural setting on Quaker Church Road east of the town of Yorktown Heights. To the north is the Carpenter Hill Cemetery and residential homes. The two-story rectangular structure is a wood frame building, measuring approximately fourth by thirty feet, that was erected on a fieldstone foundation. It is covered with clapboard and shingles. A single brick chimney is in the center of the slate-covered gable roof. Two separate entrances on the principal façade are flanked by two six-over-six double-hung sash windows with shutters. A one-story porch extends across the front with two steps running its entire length. Entering through either of the double doors, there is a large first floor meeting space with centrally directed benches, some loose, some attached. A second-story gallery, running eight feet five inches above the main floor, is accessible by the stairs at the southwest and southeast corners. On the west under the stairs is a door leading from the main room into the cloakroom. Off the north wall of the cloakroom is a door leading to the privy. For more information on the Amawalk Friends Meeting House refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertySite of Old Croton Dam; New Croton Dam
MunicipalityYorktown
Community
Street Number
Street AddressOld Croton Lake Road (Route 129)

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  06/19/73
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerNYC Board of Water Supply
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectAlfonse Fteley, Chief Engineer and others
Builder
Building Type
Building Type, DetailsDams (two);one submerged; unused
Architectural StyleNA
Architectural Style, DetailsNA
Current Use
Current Use, DetailsWater supply
Original Use
Original Use, DetailsWater supply
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1842/1906
Structural System
Structural System, Detailscut stone, rubble filled
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsWhen the gates to the New Croton Dam were opened in 1906 it submerged the Old Croton Dam. Prior to this modifications were made to the latter including removal of its gate house roof, removal of all woodwork and closure of its inlet to the Old Croton Aqueduct. The New Croton Dam remains substantially unaltered.
Date of Alterationsc. 1904-1906

SignificanceThe New Croton Dam is the largest hand-shaped cut stone structure in the United States and thoughout the world is exceeded in size only by the Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt. The dam it replaced, the Old Croton, lies beneath the waters of an expanded reservoir providing a unique contrast between old and new as well as the unusual phenonen of an intact underwater archaeological site.
DescriptionThe Old Croton dam was built (1837-1842) to provide a water supply for the growing city of New York. However, need soon outstriped the supply, and the New Croton Dam was built (1892-1906) some 3.5 miles downstream from the older structure. This massive cut stone structure 240' high increased the length of the reservoir to nineteen miles and completely submerged the older dam. The New Croton Dam is distinguished by its arched road bridge, spillway design and sensitive employment of cut stone.


PropertyYorktown Heights Railroad Station
MunicipalityYorktown
Community
Street Number
Street AddressCommerce Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  03/19/81
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  01/26/81
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerTown of Yorktown
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectNew York Central RR Putnam Division
BuilderNew York Central RR Putnam Division
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsTransportation
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsMuseum
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsTransportation
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodCommercial
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1877-1886
Structural SystemTimber Frame
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
Alterations.Between the time of the building's construction and the cessation of rail service in 1962, alterations included painting the wood paneling, covering the hardwood floors with asphalt tile, installing electricity, and moving the stove and chimney to the east wall. A major restoration project, undertaken by the Town of Yorktown in 1976, consisted of returning the building, inside and out, to near-original appearance. For more information see the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Yorktown Heights Railroad Station is an important architectural and historically resource of the Town of Yorktown. The station is representative of the picturesque rural architecture of the New York Central’s Putnam Division. Standing by 1886, it became the nucleus for the area’s turn-of-the-century commercial development. Restored in 1976, the building retains much of its original character and fabric, and is one of only two station of this scale and design still standing in Westchester County.
DescriptionThe Yorktown Heights Railroad Station is located on one-and-one-half scares of land near the present commercial center of this northern Westchester County community. One-story high with a shingled hipped gable roof, the railroad station has beige exterior sheathing of board and batten construction on the lower third of the building and clapboard above. A vernacular half-timber effect is achieved by the application of horizontal broads forming a framewater table and string course, and a variety of vertical frame division on all façades. Completely functional in plan, the station as originally constructed consisted of two major spaces: the waiting room and the baggage room. Interior woodwork of the building consisted of: floor-to-ceiling oak paneling; built-in benches in the waiting room; and elaborately molded cornice on the ticket office; heavy brackets supporting the ticket window shelf; a double Dutch-type door between the waiting and baggage rooms; and oak hardwood floors throughout.


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