Smith's Tavern, Armon

Photograph by Gray Williams

Historic Properties Listing

PropertyAlexander Smith Carpet Mills Historic District
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number
Street AddressSaw Mill River Road; Nepperhan Avenue; Moquette Row N; Moquette Row S; Orchard Place

Historic District NameAlexander Smith Carpet Mills Historic District
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status? Yes  08/11/83
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  07/06/83
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerVarious owners
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeIndustrial
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleInternational
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseMixed Use
Current Use, Details
Original UseIndustrial
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood; Fair
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1871-1930
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, DetailsPost-and-Beam; Wood Frame
Photograph Available?Yes
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe industrial and residential buildings of the former Alexander Smith and Sons Carpet Mills complex, located along the banks of the Saw Mill River in Yonkers, are historically and architecturally significant. Closely associated with a major technological innovation in the development of carpet manufacturing and with the industrial growth of the community, the mills’ scale and organization make clear reference to the manufacturing process. Although no longer occupied by the Smith Company, the cohesiveness of the stylistically varied complex, with its numerous outstanding vistas, remains largely intact and the traditional relationship between housing and factory, as exemplified by the row houses that climb the hill west of the factory, is still evident.
DescriptionThe Alexander Smith and Sons Carpet Mills in Yonkers is a thirty-eight acre factory complex significant in the industrial development of the city of Yonkers and the county of Westchester, and in the history of carpet manufacturing. The group of buildings is comprised of nineteen stylistically varied industrial structure and six rows of workers housing. Constructed from 1871 to 1930, the builings line the banks of the Saw Mill River, which for many years was the major source of power for mill operations. For a detailed description of the buildings within the Alexander Smith and Sons Carpet Mills Historic District refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyBell Place-Locust Hill Avenue Historic District
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number
Street AddressBell Place; Locust Hill Avenue

Historic District NameBell Place-Locust Hill Avenue Historic District
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status? Yes  08/29/85
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/27/85
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerMultiple ownership (see WCHS files)
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleItalianate, French Second Empire
Architectural Style, DetailsHigh Victorian Gothic, Queen Anne
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1855-1887
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations1 Bell Place- one-story rear addition; 17 Bell Place- one-story rear addition; 12 Bell Place- late nineteenth century additions including a third story, modern siding; 39 Locust Hill Avenue- eclectic additions; 57 Locust Hill Avenue- two-story rear addition.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Bell Place-Locust Hill Avenue Historic District is architecturally significant as one of the last relatively intact and cohesive mid-nineteenth century residential neighborhoods remaining in Yonkers. Developed between 1855 and 1887, the area's location near the commercial center of Yonkers contributed to its growth as a residential enclave for prosperous middle-class citizens. Architecturally the district contains middle-class residences in a variety of picturesque styles including Italianate, French Second Empire, High Victorian Gothic, and Queen Anne. Despite alterations to buildings within the district and blighted condition of the surrounding community, the area retains the scale and ambience of a distinctive nineteenth-century neighborhood.
DescriptionThe Bell Place-Locust Hill Avenue Historic District is located on a prominent hill in southwestern Yonkers that overlooks the city's downtown business district. Approximately two square blocks in area, the district consists of a one block stretch of Locust Hill Avenue and Bell Place, a short residential street that runs parallel to Locust Hill Avenue. Within the boundaries of the district are 11 historic features, of which eight are primary structures and three are subsidiary buildings (carriage houses). The district is unified by the similar size and scale of its building as well as by their regular siting along the street. All contributing buildings were constructed between 1855 and 1887. They consist of medium sized, freestanding single-family residences between two and three stories in height. The majority of the structures are constructed of brick, although two examples of wood frame residences can be found at 12 Bell Place and 53 Locust Hill Avenue. Stylistically, the residences and related outbuildings in the district were designed in the various revival styles popular during the second half of the 19th century. There are three examples of Italianate style residences (1, 7, and 12 Bell Place) and two examples of French Second Empire dwellings (17 Bell Place, 39 Locust Hill Avenue), with the remaining houses exemplifying the High Victorian Italianate style (57 Locust Hill Avenue), the High Victorian Gothic style (45 Locust Hill Avenue), and the Queen Anne style (53 Locust Hill Avenue). Many of the dwellings feature wide verandas, architectural moldings that articulate the buildings, and round and segmental arched windows. For a detailed description of the structures within the Bell Place-Locust Hill Avenue Historic District refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyDelavan Terrace Historic District
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number
Street AddressDelavan Terrace; Palisade Avenue; Park Avenue

Historic District NameDelevan Terrace Historic District
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status? Yes  09/15/83
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  08/17/83
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerVarious owners
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectVarious
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleLate Victorian
Architectural Style, DetailsLate 19th And 20th Century Revivals
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent; Good
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1854-1926
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe area emcompassed by the Delavan Terrace Historic District is an intact and cohesive turn-of-the-century residential neighborhood in Yonkers. Within the boundaries of the nominated district can be found good examples of early twentieth century domestic architecture as well as one of the few surviving Eastlake interiors in the municipality. The houses that compose the district embody the distinctive characteristics of the period in which they were constructed and, in a few instances, are associated with the lives of persons significant in shaping the history of Yonkers and Westchester County. The major stylistic currents represented include: Queen Anne, Shingle Style, Bungalow, Tudor Revival, and Spanish Colonial Revival. Despite alterations to several buildings within the district, the area retains the scale and ambience of an early residential development.
DescriptionThe Delavan Terrace Historic District is a small enclave of large turn-of-the-century residences. Within the boundaries of the district are located eleven houses that are architecturally and historically significant and are visible from public thoroughfares. Most of the structures date from the early 20th century when the land was developed as a middle-class suburban community. Styles of the homes include Queen Anne, Shingle Style, Bungalow, Tudor Revival, and Spanish Colonial Revival. For detailed descriptions on the houses within the Delavan Terrace Historic District refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyEleazer Hart House
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number243
Street AddressBronxville Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  07/29/82
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/82
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerMiller Real Estate
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleFederal
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionFair
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtpre-1783; c. 1788
Structural SystemTimber Frame
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsA number of 19th century additions are evident on the exterior, particularly in the rear. Above the older farmhouse are two additions with three distinctive roof slopes. One of these additions is sheathed in clapboard, the others in wide shingles. Another addition to the first story at the northwest corner of the house encloses part of the present-day kitchen.
Date of Alterations19th century

SignificanceThe Eleazer Hart House is a rare surviving example in southern Westchester County of an eighteenth-century residence. Incorporated within the structure is the only surviving tenant farmhouse, original to its site, in Yonkers that dates from the Philipse Manor era (1684-1783). Together with the main section of the building, detailed in the Federal style, the house is a fine example of the vernacular craftsmanship of the region and retains much of its early fabric.
DescriptionThe Eleazer Hart House is located on a less than one acre site in a dense residential neighborhood ("Cedar Knolls") of Yonkers. A south-facing tenant farmhouse, dating from the Philipse Manor era (1684-1783), is incorporated into the rear of the main house that dates from the Federal period (c. 1788). Two bays deep, and clad in wide shingles painted white, the gable-roofed frame farmhouse also sits upon a dry-laid stone foundation above its own cellar. Framing timbers are evident. The elements of the main façade are arranged in a manner uncharacteristic of the Federal style. Five bays wide on the first story, the second story contains only three bays, and there are two roof dormers. Two interior brick chimneys emerge from the roof line, on at the north end, and the other set in from the south end. Six-over-six glazing is used in the sash windows, flanked by paneled shutters painted black. The main entrance is located in the center bay underneath a shed-roofed porch of later date. The wall surface of the entrance area, framed within two simple pilasters, is sheathed in flush clapboards. The exterior face of the door is a typical triple-paneled Federal form. The interior of the house retains many important Federal features. In plan, the central passage, containing the stairs, enters onto two rooms to the south ad one to the north. There are many details on the fireplaces. Baseboards, chair rails, and cornice moldings, all of simple profile, have been retained on the interior, along with some early floorboards and hardware. An unused, one-and-one-half story, gable-roofed barn, sheathed in once-painted narrow clapboards, is the only outbuilding on the property.


PropertyEthan Flagg House (Blessed Sacrament Monastery)
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number23
Street AddressPark Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  07/06/98
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  08/01/98
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  07/06/98
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerGreyston Foundation
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectJohn B. Clermont (monastery)
BuilderJ. and G. Stewart (house)
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, DetailsReligious
Architectural StyleItalianate
Architectural Style, DetailsNeo-Romanesque
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsHealth care: clinic
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, DetailsReligious
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1855; 1922
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Ethan Flagg House/ Blessed Sacrament Monastery is significant as an excellent example of the Italianate villas popular in America during the 1850s, and especially popular during the mid-nineteenth century in Lower Hudson Valley communities such as Yonkers; as a building associated with an important figure in the history of Yonkers during its transition from a small village into one of the largest cities in New York State; and as a representative example of early-20th century religious architecture in Westchester County. The period of significance for this property begins with the construction of the Flagg House in the mid 1850s, includes the 1915 purchase of the house by the Sacramentine Nuns, and ends with the construction of the monastery addition in 1922. The Ethan Flagg House/ Blessed Sacrament Monastery retains a high level of integrity of location, design, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association.
DescriptionThe Ethan Flagg House/ Blessed Sacrament Monastery is a complex single building composed of three building campaigns: a mid-19th century residence (Flagg House), a 1922 monastery addition, and a 1954 infirmary wing that connects the residence and monastery addition. The building is located on the west side of Park Avenue between Ashburton Avenue and Flagg Street in the city of Yonkers. The property is located in a mixed-use section of Yonkers. The Flagg House is a two-story with cupola structure set in the middle of the property with its front elevation facing south. The house sits on a base of rock-faced random ashlar. The upper floors are brick with stone trim at the windows and door. The front elevation of the house is five bays wide with the central bay projecting slightly. On the first story, the house is entered through a centrally-placed, round-arch entry with wood and glass double doors. The interior of the Flagg House retains much of its original detail. The building is entered through a rectangular vestibule with original paneled wainscot, plaster walls, and a vaulted plaster ceiling in Gothic style. In the original layout of the first floor there were four major rooms, two on either side of the hall. The only major alteration has been the removal of the wall separating the rooms on the west side. The rooms on the second floor have plaster ceiling moldings and four contain marble fireplaces. The monastery addition is massed in a complex manner, with a chapel wing extending towards Park Avenue, the four-story monastery building itself and a projecting two-story rear wings with a conservatory. The building is faced in textured, buff-colored "rug" brick with limestone trim and some cast-stone and stucco detail. The chapel is located at the southwest portion of the complex, just north of the Flagg House. The nave of the chapel contains four bays, separated by buttresses, with paired rectangular windows in the basement and paired round-arch windows set within ornamental, round-arch, brick frames. For more details on the Ethan Flagg House/ Blessed Sacrament Monastery refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyGlenview (John Trevor House)
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number511
Street AddressWarburton Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  06/19/72
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  02/10/72
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerThe Hudson River Museum
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectCharles W. Clinton
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsLate Victorian
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsMuseum
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
Neighborhood
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1876-7
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsThe basic structure is unchanged. Alterations to the exterior are limited to the addition of a chimney, and the removal of several porches, the roof ornament, and a piazza which had extended along the river façade. Portions of the interior have been altered in order to accommodate the functions of a museum, and a ground-level and sub-terranean passage now connects Glenview with a new museum structure of poured concrete.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceGlenview, a prime example of Victorian eclecticism, was designed in 1876 by Charles W. Clinton, student of Richard Upjohn and partner in the firm of Clinton and Russell of New York City. The house is characteristic of a large number of Hudson River country residences built during the late 19th century for financiers who desired opulent rural estates within commuting distance of Manhattan. Few of these structures have remained unaltered in the heavily populated region immediately north of New York City. Glenview provides a very fine illustration of Eastlake interior design and of the craftsmanship of Daniel Pabst, cabinetmaker of Philadelphia. John Bond Trevor, for whom Glenview was constructed, was a wealthy financier and philanthropist who established a Wall Street brokerage business, and a stock-and-bullion-dealing firm in partnership with James B. Colgate.
DescriptionSituated on a bluff with an unobstructed view of the Hudson and the Palisades, Glenview stands two-and-a-half stories in height, except for its 84-foot tower, which culminates in a steeply-sloped pyramidal roof. The essentially rectangular plan is broken by four projections in addition to the tower. The southern and eastern elevations consist of four bays each, the western elevation five bays, and the northern three bays. Glenview’s load-bearing masonry walls are constructed of locally-quarried grey stone and ornamented by shaped lintels, rosettes, and four string courses of Ohio sandstone. The high, steep-sided hipped roof rises to a ridge above the cornice. Now covered with composition shingles, the roof is interrupted by ten dormers, the roofs of which echo the shape of the main roof. The interior, executed in the Eastlake manner, contains fine woodwork that exhibits the craftsmanship of Daniel Pabst, cabinetmaker of Philadelphia. The use of encaustic and majolica tiles in combination with elaborately-carved woodwork and massive ebony columns contribute to the opolent character of the main hallway. An elaborate sideboard, and the mantel pieces executed by Pabst, as well as the door enframements are particularly noteworthy.


PropertyHalcyon Place Historic District
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number
Street AddressHalcyon Place

Historic District NameHalcyon Place Historic District
Local Landmark Status?Yes  11/27/90
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status? Yes  01/11/91
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  11/27/90
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerMultiple owners
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectVarious
BuilderHarry Woodhouse (developer)
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleNeoclassical, Queen Anne, Shingle
Architectural Style, DetailsAmerican Four Square, Mission Revival
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1900-1024
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe homes have only undergone minor alterations. Storm windows have been added to many of the homes. Other additions include replacement roofing and/or siding.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Halcyon Place Historic District includes 12 architecturally and historically significant properties dating from the late 19th century to the early years of the 20th century. Together, these properties reflect the transformation of Yonkers from its mid-19th century prominence as an industrial center to its later role as a suburban community. Distinctive examples of a broad range of architectural styles survive intact and illustrate changing ideas concerning the form and function of the suburban house as well as the tastes and prosperity of local citizens. As a residential area that possesses integrity of location, design, setting, workmanship, and association, the Halcyon Place Historic District attests to the regional prominence that has characterized Yonkers since its first settlements in 1646.
DescriptionThe Halcyon Place Historic District is located in a residential area of the city of Yonkers. The district contains all of Halcyon Place and contains 12 primary properties. The district is a residential cul-de-sac constructed by one developed at the turn of the century. All of the modest frame and masonry dwellings in the district were constructed between 1901 and 1924 for middle-class buyers and exhibit prevailing architectural styles of the period. Many of the dwellings employ simplified Neoclassical ornamentation and feature foursquare configurations or massings derived from the late Queen Anne period. Relatively narrow, rectangular lots with regular street frontages averaging 40 feet and depths of 100 feet distinguish most of the district. For an annotated list describing each property included in the Halcyon Place Historic District refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyJohn Copcutt Mansion (St. Casimir's Rectory)
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number239
Street AddressNeperhan Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  09/12/85
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  08/07/85
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerSaint Casimir's Church
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
BuilderJohn Copcutt
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleItalianate
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1854
Structural SystemOther (describe)
Structural System, DetailsGranite set in wide mortar joints
Photograph Available?
AlterationsModifications to the exterior include the removal of the top story of the central tower on the main façade and part of the once continuous front veranda. The landscaping of the grounds has been altered. A modern kitchen has been added to the first floor. The basement, once housing kitchen facilities at the rear exposed elevation, now serves as a storage area and contains a modern heating plant.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe John Copcutt Mansion (St. Casimir's Rectory) is an architecturally and historically significant example of an Italian Villa in Yonkers. Closely associated with John Copcutt, an early industrialist whose move to the city in 1845 heralded the transformation of the village from an agricultural to an industrial center, the mansion remains one of the city’s few architectural resources from the mid-nineteenth century and an outstanding example of its period and style. Although the building has housed a convent and a rectory within recent years, it remains substantially intact and boasts a finely detailed period interior.
DescriptionThe John Copcutt Mansion (St. Casimir’s Rectory) is situated on Nepperhan Avenue in a mixed-use area on the edge of Yonker’s downtown business section. Serving as the rectory for the church, the mansion is sited above a contemporary school building that is not visible from the front of the property due to a sharp change in grade. The mansion was built in 1854 by John Copcutt, an early Yonkers industrialist. Constructed in a symmetrical cruciform plan, the two-and-one-half story structure of irregularly coursed cut granite set in wide mortar joints was designed in an elaborate Italianate style. The front elevation of the building is five bays wide and is divided into three major sections by a projecting central tower. The entrance, located in the three-story tower, is accented by a round-arched architrave and a small hipped-roof porch supported on cast-iron columns. The side elevations feature central bays that project substantially out from the wall plane. The rear façade rises above a tall exposed basement level. This elevation retains its piazza with cast-iron posts and balustrade supported by tall brick piers. The interior of the building remains relatively intact. Divided into nine principal spaces on the ground floor, the central axis of the house is occupied by a large stair hall featuring enclosed vestibules at either end. Round-arched doors surrounded by rope moldings lead to this hall from the vestibules. Additional features in the rooms include plaster work, marble mantels, and other decorative details. The second floor in the mansion contains no architectural features of the distinction of the public level except for the hall area, which is detailed by unsupported pendant aches and shouldered door surrounds. For more details on the John Copcutt Mansion refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyMott Mill
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number11-23
Street AddressSt. Casimir Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  12/18/03
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  02/12/04
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  12/18/03
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerSpeiser-Dabran Management Corp.
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectWilliam P. Mott (1852 building)
BuilderFerro Concrete Company (1906 building)
Building TypeIndustrial
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsSenior Housing
Original UseIndustrial
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1852; 1906
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsIn 1931 and 1934, the original mill building was renovated for use by the Cleanart Laundry Co. A turbine driven generator was installed in 1931. A new brick boiler house was added in 1934. Also in 1934, a poured concrete floor was added to the lower level of the stone building. The upper floors were renovated to include a new interior vestibule, stairs, and new restrooms. Other renovations to the 1852 Mott Mill in 1934 included a new egress and gateway to St. Casimir Avenue, a new delivery entrance at lower level and a new steel smoke stack for a new steam boiled and oil burner. The old wooden girders and interior wood columns were replaced at about this time. The old mill building was repointed probably in the 1930s or 1940s. The two buildings were renovated for housing in 2002, with replacement windows and doors, new roofs, and new partition walls and finishes on the interior.
Date of Alterations1931, 1934, 1940s, 2002

SignificanceThe Mott Mill property is historically significant for its association with the textile industry in Yonkers and in particular for its association with the nationally known and locally significant Alexander Smith Carpet Company. The 1852 stone mill building is architecturally significant as an excellent and uncommon example of a mid-19th century banked stone mill building. The large 1906 reinforced concrete structure abutting the building is significant as an early and intact reinforced concrete industrial structure in Westchester County.
DescriptionThe Mott Mill property consists of an 1852 stone mill building with a 1906 reinforced concrete building abutting its north façade. The four-story, three-bay, mid-19th century utilitarian stone structure had coursed gray fieldstone walls and segmental arched windows with stone lintels on the front façade. The four-to-six story, twenty-one-bay, early-20th century reinforced concrete structure interconnects with the stone building. The simple structure has large inset windows with perimeter columns acting as pilasters. The complex is in downtown Yonkers in a mixed residential, commercial, and industrial neighborhood. The 1852 mill building faces Elm Street and is set back nearly 100 feet from the road. The early-20th century section is north of the 1852 mill along St. Casimir Avenue. The property is adjacent to the Nepperhan River, which provided waterpower for the mill. The two buildings are largely intact and the property has recently been converted into housing for the elderly.


PropertyPhilipsburgh Building
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number2-8
Street AddressHudson Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  03/29/02
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/22/02
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  03/29/02
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectG. Howard Chamberlin
Builder
Building TypeCommercial
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsItalian Renaissance
Current UseMulti Family Dwelling
Current Use, DetailsMeeting Space
Original UseCommercial
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodCommercial
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1904-5
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsAfter standing vacant for some years, restoration began on the Philipsburgh Building in 1999. The apartments on the upper floors were rehabilitated for housing for artists and the ballroom and other spaces on the ground floor were restored and have been returned to public use.
Date of Alterations1999-2001

SignificanceThe Philipsburgh Building, erected in 1904-5 is a reflection of the rapid commercial expansion of the downtown Gerry Square area of Yonkers as that city thrived as an industrial center and as a burgeoning suburban community located just north of New York City. The building is also significant as a handsome Italian Renaissance style building designed by G. Howard Chamberlin, an architect active in Yonkers in the early years of the 20th century. The building is ornamented with finely crafted marble detail on the exterior and has an ornate interior ballroom that is among the grandest spaces of its era in Yonkers.
DescriptionThe Philipsburgh Building is located on a gently sloping site on the south side of Hudson Street, between South Broadway and Riverdale Avenue, in the downtown section of the city of Yonkers. The building is located near the edge of the heavily built-up historic commercial center of Yonkers. The building consists of a five-story structure facing onto Hudson Street, that original had storefronts on the ground floor and offices above (converted to apartments in 1935), and a one-story, double-height wing at the rear that houses a ballroom. The symmetrical front elevation is eleven bays wide. The façade has a one-story white marble base, with reddish-brown brick and white marble trim on the upper stories. The brick is laid in Flemish bond. The focus of the façade is a centrally-placed, projecting marble portico support by columns. The four upper stories are articulated by rectangular one-over-one sash windows. A notable feature on the interior is the ballroom, or great hall, which is a large rectangular, double-height room measuring 4800 square feet with a thirty foot ceiling. For more details on the Philipsburgh Building refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyPhilipse Manor Hall
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number
Street AddressWarburton Avenue and Dock Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  10/15/66
National Historic Landmark Status? Yes  
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerNew York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectFrederick Philipse
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGeorgian Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsMuseum
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
Neighborhood
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1682
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe Hall underwent restorations in the 1970s.
Date of Alterations1970s

SignificanceAlthough the construction date of the earliest portion of Philipse Manor is open to question, the building is an outstanding survivor of the 18th century Dutch manorial system in the lower Hudson Valley. Erected in stages between 1682 and 1758, Philipse Manor Hall is one of the most notable examples of Early Georgian Colonial architecture in the United States. The house, in its present form, is a splendid example of "organic growth" during which process the original small two-room house was gradually expanded into a great Georgian country house. The mansion served as the social and administrative center of the great manor of Philipsburgh, created under English rule in 1693. Governed successively by Lords of the Manor, Frederick Philipse I, II, and III, Philipsburg was closer to the colonial capital of New York and was more intimately associated with its social and political institutions than any of the other Hudson River baronies. The house today is important for its high Georgian interiors, distinguished by intricate plaster ceilings and elaborately carved paneling. Careful restoration is returning the whole to its former elegance, preserving one of the great examples of Georgian craftsmanship.
DescriptionPhilipse Manor Hall is an imposing two-and-a-half story building, L-shaped in plan, of brick and fieldstone construction. The south front is fieldstone with a small entrance porch with slender Doric columns and a triglyph frieze. The length of this wing is emphasized by the absence of any central feature of composition; the two doorways are alike and neither of them is centered. White paneled shutters are used on all the first floor windows and a modillioned cornice surrounds the house under the slightly flared eaves of the roof. Dormer windows pierce all sides. The interior trim of the south entrance hall and west parlor appears early; the parlor trim is simple fielded paneling. The southeast parlor has full late-Georgian details. The rare papier-mâché rococo ceiling in Philipse Manor Hall shows birds, animals, pastoral figures and two large busts. For more details on Philipse Manor Hall refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyPlashbourne Estate
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number51
Street AddressCarlton Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  05/24/06
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectCarrere and Hastings
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleTudor Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural Condition
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe former Plashbourne Estate, located at 51 Carlton Road, is an architecturally significant property located within the municipal boundaries of the City of Yonkers, near the adjacent Village of Bronxville. The property is a substantial and relatively intact example of a Tudor Revival-inspired suburban estate designed in the early years of the 20th century by the notable New York City based architectural firm of Carrere and Hastings, and was located within Lawrence Park West development.
DescriptionConstructed in 1911, the property formerly known as the Plashbourne Estate is located at 51 Carlton Road in the City of Yonkers. The distinctive Tudor Revival-style house designed by the renowned architectural firm of Carrere and Hastings for muralist and sculptor Violet Oakley retains a significant amount of its original salient architectural qualities. The original portion of the house is a two-and-a-half story structure. The stone structure with irregular compound plan and cross-gabled roofline is composed of a central body flanked by offset perpendicular blocks with flared gable-ends. A one-and-a-half story gabled entry block is centrally placed on the façade. The polychrome slate roof is punctuated by gabled dormers that contain six-over-six wood sash and are sheathed in decorative copper panels. The structural system of the house consists of stone foundations and load-bearing exterior stone walls that carry the wood-frame structural system of the interior portions. For more information on the Plashbourne Estate refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertySherwood House
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number340
Street AddressTuckahoe Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/10/84
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  04/03/84
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerYonkers Historical Society
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
BuilderThomas Sherwood
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsHistorical Society/ Museum
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodOpen land
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1740
Structural SystemWood Frame, Interlocking Joints
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsIn 1955 the house was extensively repaired. A small lean-to contained a bathroom and closet were removed from the rear of the main house. The front porch supports and portions of the rear wall had rotted and were replaced.
Date of Alterations1955

SignificanceThe Sherwood House is one of Yonker's most important historic resources associated with the city's early settlement. Built around 1740 as a tenant farmhouse on the vast manor of Philipsburgh, it is one of only four pre-Revolutionary War buildings to survive in Yonkers. It is a representative example of the small farmhouses built in Westchester County during the eighteenth century and retains many historic construction features. The Sherwood House is a well-recognized local landmark conspicuously located in a densely developed suburban setting and is a rare surviving link with the early settlement of Yonkers.
DescriptionThe Sherwood House and its two related outbuildings are located on a 2.25 acre parcel of land just south of Tuckahoe Road, a heavily traveled, four-lane highway in Yonkers. The original section of the house was constructed in 1740. Built into the hillside, the house is a one-story frame structure on an exposed basement of local stone. The east elevation has a two-story porch that spans the entire façade. The roof of the porch, supported by four square columns, is created by the broadly projecting eave and curve of the main gable roof. A simple rail with narrow, square balusters frames the upper story. The rear of the original house has an off-center Dutch door with original, hand-wrought latches and bolts and a simple wood surround. Attached to the south side of the main hose is a two-story frame addition with a gable roof and side chimney. Many original features survive on the interior including plaster walls, hand-hewn beams, some window and door surrounds, and the large stone kitchen fireplace with bake oven in the basement. For more information on the Sherwood House refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertySt. John's Episcopal Church
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number1
Street AddressHudson Street @ Getty Square

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  07/29/82
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerRector, Wardens and Vestrymen of St. John's Church
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectEdward Tuckerman Potter (1874)
Builder
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsLate Victorian, Romanesque
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodCommercial
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1752-3, 1874, 1890-1
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe church was remodeled, rebuilt, and enlarged in 1874.
Date of Alterations1874

SignificanceSt. John's Episcopal Church in Yonkers is one of New York State’s oldest churches and one of the first to be built of stone. It has played an integral part in the history of the surrounding community since the mid-18th century. Formed in 1693, the parish was given its first building on this site in 1752 by Frederick Philipse II, the second Lord of the Manor of Philipsburgh. The church was used as a hospital during the Revolution and then returned to religious use; many of Yonkers' most prominent citizens were among its parishioners. Although the church was remodeled, rebuilt, and enlarged in the 19th century, significant original fabric survives. St. John’s stands as a testament to the architectural and historical development of the city of Yonkers.
DescriptionSt. John's Episcopal Church is located in Yonkers’ central business district. It is a load-bearing masonry structure three bays wide on its east and west elevations, and approximately nine bays long on its north and south elevations. The walls of the church are constructed of rough gray fieldstone with all openings and corners finished in red common brick. Located above the roofs of the side aisles, the opaque clearstory lights consist of a continuous band of metal-framed rectangular openings with diagonally intersecting muntins. The church takes the shape of a cross in plan, with entrance made from the west into a central nave aisle flanked by side aisles and intercepted by a transept east of center. The floor of the nave is laid with mosaic tiles. The walls of the interior, originally painted and stenciled, are now plastered. The floor of the altar, separated from the nave by a giant arch opening, is Italian marble. Also on the property are the parish house and chapel, the recotry, and the school. For more details on St. John's Episcopal Church refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertySt. John's Protestant Episcopal Church, Tuckahoe
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number100
Street AddressUnderhill Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  05/21/92
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerSt. John's Parish
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleColonial Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1789
Structural SystemWood Frame, Interlocking Joints
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
Alterations1847, 1870, 1898 enlargements; 1929 and 1948 refurbishing of interior.
Date of AlterationsVarious years

SignificanceSt. John's Church, Tuckahoe, is architecturally significant as an excellent example of an early twentieth century Colonial Revival style church in the City of Yonkers. The church incorporates elements from the earliest church building constructed in 1798 as well as elements from a number of different building campaigns through 1948 which together illustrate the transformations in the liturgy of the Episcopal church. The church currently reflects the renovations completed in 1929. St. John's Church also reflects the transformation of the Colonial Heights community in which it is sited from an 18th century agrarian area to a 20th century suburban residential neighborhood, and the vitality of the Colonial Revival architectural style in the first half of the 20th century.
DescriptionSt. John's Church, Tuckahoe, is located on the north side of Underhill Street in a residential area of Yonkers. The Colonial Revival style church is set back from the street and is sited on a low rise. The rectangular, clapboard structure is crowned by a gable roof with slightly flaring eaves surmounted by a small belfry capped by wooden pinnacles. Facing south, the main façade features a centrally placed, projecting enclosed gable-roofed entrance porch above which is located a Palladian window. The east (four bays long) and west (five bays long) elevations are punctuated by round-arched windows featuring clear glass panes. A small, board-and-batten chancel, the north wall of which incorporates a tripartite stained glass window, marks the north end of the building. The interior of the church is marked by a central aisle flanked to either side by partially-boxed pews. A barrel vaulted ceiling, from which are suspended small brass multi-branched chandeliers, crowns the whole. A slightly raised chancel is located at the north end of the building. The focal point of the chancel is a tripartite window placed above the altar depicting Saint John the Evangelist in the central panel. There is an active cemetery on the property.


PropertyUntermeyer Park
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number
Street AddressBetween North Broadway (Route 9) and Warburton Avenue South of Odell Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/31/74
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerCity of Yonkers
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectWilliam Welles Bosworth
Builder
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsPark
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsGrecian
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsPark
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsPark
Structural ConditionGood
Neighborhood
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1866 (estate)
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsThe park underwent significant renovations in the 1970s.
Date of Alterations1970s

SignificanceA Beaux Arts Garden in the Grecian style, Untermeyer Park, consists of a portion of the estate of lawyer Samuel Untermeyer who at the turn of the century acted as counsel in numerous celebrated cases covered almost every phase of corporate, civil, criminal, and international law. Maintained today as a public park, the Gardens remain an idyllic dream, enacted in mosaic marble, a rare expression of the idealization common in the texts of its time.
DescriptionLocated along North Broadway on the property of the former Untermeyer Estate, lies the Greek Garden known as Untermeyer Park. Four octagonal brick towers mark the corners of the garden’s principal section. The theatre area still contains large expanses of finely detailed mosaics in a variety of patterns. The south wall contains a large stone portal and wrought iron gate. The east-west axis of the pool terminates east of a circular classical pavilion known as the "Temple," with marble columns, overlooking another portion of the garden below. A covered colonnade of pergola, protected on the north side by a high wall, leads west from the garden down a terraced slope of 250 feet in length. Now overgrown, the rock garden, located southwest of Untermeyer Park was once a pile of stone of great size. The top of this feature is still adorned by a circular classical gazebo of stone and delicately intertwined wrought iron. A deteriorating stone carriage house stands within the park. Today Untermeyer Park is an 24-acre public park.


PropertyW.B. Thompson Mansion (Alder Manor)
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number1061
Street AddressNorth Broadway (Route 9)

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  10/29/82
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  09/25/92
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerThe Tara Circle
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectCarrere and Hastings
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsRenaissance Revival
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsIrish Cultural Center
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
Neighborhood
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1912
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsWhen the building became a part of the former Elizabeth Seton College, the second and third floors were converted to classrooms, administrative offices, and residences. The Oriental character of the den was substantially altered by the college’s remodelling of the den into the campus library. Tara's Circle is currently restroring the structure.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Thompson Mansion is one of the few surviving, early 20th century palatial residences in Yonkers. While many of these grand estates have been demolished or exist in ill repair, the Thompson home is relatively intact and well maintained. Built in 1912 by the prominent firm of Carrere and Hastings, the mansion is a fine example of the Renaissance country home. It is valuable not only for its architectural significance, but also as a visual record of the lifestyle of America’s early 20th century millionaires.
DescriptionThe Thompson Mansion is located at the top of a hill overlooking the Hudson River in northwest Yonkers. Built in 1912, the mansion is a fine example of a classically inspired Renaissance Revival style building. The two-and-one-half story building with a full basement is made of limestone. Numerous chimneys and dormers with single double-hung windows punctuate the tiled hip and gable roofs. The Renaissance Revival entrance of the east side has enlarged columns supporting a broken segmental arched pediment and low relief classically inspired decoration. The seven-bay façade is flanked by a two-bay wing on the south and a two-story rectangular service wing on the north. The elaborate rear garden entrance has three French doors recessed behind a Palladian arcade. The vestibule of the main entrance is decorated with terra-cotta bas-reliefs and exquisite doors of glass and wrought iron. The floors in the vestibule and entrance hall are marble. The hall has a compartmentalized plaster ceiling. The drawing room is paneled in walnut. Around the fireplace in the drawing room is a bolection molding; carved swags, birds and flowers frame the panel above the fireplace. Its rare, English style, trompe-l’oeil painted ceiling appears well preserved. Ceilings in the library, music room, and dining room are coffered. The grand stair hall is three stories high and has a beautifully carved iron and wood rail. A tiled indoor swimming pool is located in the northern end of the second floor. For more details on the Thompson Mansion refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyYonkers Post Office
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number79-81
Street AddressMain Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  05/11/89
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/11/89
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  05/11/89
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerUnited States Postal Service, Northeast Region
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectJames A. Wetmore
Builder
Building TypeGovernment
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther
Architectural Style, DetailsClassical Revival
Current UseGovernment
Current Use, Details
Original UseGovernment
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionFair
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1927
Structural SystemMetal
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsMinor alterations have been made to the mailing platform area; otherwise, the exterior is essentially as constructed. Offices now occupy a small part of the lobby. Teller windows have been somewhat altered and the lighting replaced.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Yonkers Post Office occupies am entire block in the downtown commercial area of the city of Yonkers. The structure is two stories in height and has a steel frame with facades of smooth-faced, buff-colored limestone. Massive in size, the building is fifteen bays wide on Main Street, nine bays wide on Buena Vista Avenue, eleven bays wide on Nepperhan Street and thirteen bays wide on Market Place. With the exception of the rear façade, the facades are symmetrically composed with the bays divided by flat two-story engaged pilasters with Corinthian capitals. The roof is flat. On the Main Street and Buena Vista Avenue facades, the central three bays contain entrances. Ornamental bronze lampposts flank each entrance. The L-shaped public lobby, which is entered from the Main Street and Buena Vista Avenue sides, is largely intact. It has terrazzo floors and buff-colored marble wainscoting. Flat pilasters of the same marble with Corinthian capitals line the inside and outside walls. The ornate plaster ceiling is coffered and divided into sections by beams at each bay. Most surfaces are adorned with low-relief decoration. For more information on the Yonkers Post Office refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.
DescriptionThe Yonkers Post Office is an architecturally significant monumental public building located in the commercial and industrial core of the city of Yonkers. Designed and constructed in 1927, during the tenure of James A. Wetmore as Acting Supervising Architect of the Treasury, the post office is a distinguished example of the Classical Revival style of architecture, exhibiting composition, use of fine materials and classically inspired, but restrained ornamentation. It was designed with sensitivivity to its urban setting and feature identical main facades fronting on both of the railroad station and an important commercial street. Historically, the Yonkers Post Office is associated with the period when the federal government’s building policies emphasized economy, utility, and standardization of design. However, its massive size is unusual for the period and attests to the face that Yonkers was an important urban center requiring a large mail facility. Although the Colonial Revival had become the most popular style for post office designs by the 1920s, several large postal facilities, such as the Yonkers Post Office, were designed in a restrained version of the Classical Revival style. The Yonkers Post office is particularly distinguished by the two-story Corinthian pilasters and balustrated parapet that decorate three facades of the building. Corinthian pilasters also adorn the walls of the large interior public lobby, which, in addition, features an elaborate coffered plaster ceiling. Retaining a high level of integrity, the Yonkers Post Office remains an important anchor in downtown Yonkers.


PropertyYonkers Public Bath House Number 2
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number27
Street AddressVineyard Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  10/21/85
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  08/12/85
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerMount Hebron Apostolic Temple
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsBath House
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsRomanesque Revival
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsBath House
Structural ConditionFair
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to BuildingDeterioration
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1898
Structural SystemMetal
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsOriginally articulated into three sections: a reception area, a custodian's apartent, and the bathing facilities, the interior of Public Bath House #2 was reconstructed and modernized in 1928. In 1962 the bath house was decommissioned by the city and subsequently gutted to accommodate its new use as a church.
Date of Alterations1928; 1962

SignificancePublic Bath House #2 is significant for its architectural merit and historical associations. This building was the second of the hour original bath houses constructed by the City of Yonkers to provide sanitary facilities to its working-class population. Closely resembling the small-scale commercial structures built in Yonkers at the time, the building is an excellent example of Romanesque Revival architecture. Characteristic features of its period and style include its plain brick façade, round-arched windows and entrances highlighted by radiating brick voussoirs, and simple moldings. Built in 1898, Bath House #2 is Yonkers oldest extant structure of its type. Together the three extant public baths in Yonkers represent the evolution of municipally sponsored bath houses in this country. Originally designed to provide sanitary facilities to the urban poor on congested areas of the city, the baths increasingly lost their clientale as private sanitary facilities became more commonplace in multi-family dwellings. Responding to these changes, the baths' function shifted from providing simple sanitary facilities to the poor affording opportunities for neighborhood recreation.
DescriptionPublic Bath House #2 is located on the west side of Vineyard Avenue in Yonkers and is next to multi-family dwellings. Two stories high, the structure’s façade is constructed of yellow-orange brick laid in standard bond. Its three-bay-wide ground story features a wide, centrally placed segmental-arched window divided into three sections by wood muntins and flanked on either side by an arched recessed entrance. The second level is marked by five round-arched windows whose sills are continuous with the string course. A one-story red brick ell, featuring a tall chimney at southwestern corner, continues behind the main, two-story street elevation. The interior of the structure contains no significant features.


PropertyYonkers Public Bath House Number 3
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number48
Street AddressYonkers Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  10/21/85
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  08/12/85
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerCity of Yonkers
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectGeorge S. Cowles
BuilderP.J. Flannery (mason)
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsBath House
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsSecond Renaissance Revival
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsMunicipal pool
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsBath House
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to BuildingDeterioration
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1909
Structural SystemMetal
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe mosaic plunge pool was rebuilt in 1930 by the local architect William Katz.
Date of Alterations1930

SignificancePublic Bath House #3 is significant for its architectural merit and historical associations. This building was the third of the four original bath houses constructed by the City of Yonkers to provide sanitary facilities to its working-class population. Built in 1909 to the designs of local architect George S. Cowles, Public Bath House #3 is an excellent example of a Second Renaissance Revival style municipal building. Together the three extant public baths in Yonkers represent the evolution of municipally sponsored bath houses in this country. Originally designed to provide sanitary facilities to the urban poor on congested areas of the city, the baths increasingly lost their clientale as private sanitary facilities became more commonplace in multi-family dwellings. Responding to these changes, the baths’ function shifted from providing simple sanitary facilities to the poor affording opportunities for neighborhood recreation.
DescriptionPublic Bath House #3 is located at the intersection of Yonkers Avenue and Oak Street surrounded by multi-family dwellings. Displaying the symmetrical configuration of the Second Renaissance Revival, the main elevation of Public Bath House #3 is divided into five bays. Two large segmental pediments supported by simple stone columns resting on concrete pedestals enframe the separate entrances for men and women located on each corner bay. The second story is articulated by round-arched openings-- each divided in half by a central brick mullion-- and a stone brick course. The interior is still marked by its original configuration and is divided into three main components: a reception area, the bath area, and a custodian’s apartment. The large bath area boasts a large central space with mosaic-tile wainscoted walls and a mosaic plunge pool.


PropertyYonkers Public Bath House Number 4
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number138
Street AddressLinden Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  10/21/85
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  08/12/85
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerCity of Yonkers
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectO.J. Gette
Builder
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsBath House
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsSpanish Mission
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsMunicipal pool
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsBath house
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to BuildingDeterioration
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1925
Structural SystemMetal
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsInterior renovation in 1961.
Date of Alterations1961

SignificancePublic Bath House #4 is significant for its architectural merit and historical associations. Built in 1925 to the design of local architect O.J. Gette, this building was the last of the four public bath houses in Yonkers. Employing classical detailing derived from Renaissance motifs to articulate its wall surfaces, the building’s monumental façade and entrance surround are legacies of the "City Beautiful" movement and reflect the increased attention that municipal structures received during the first quarter of the 20th century. Architecturally significant as one of the few building of its style and type in Yonkers, its plan and configuration is also important as it represents the final phase of bath house construction in both Yonkers and the nation. Together the three extant public baths in Yonkers represent the evolution of municipally sponsored bath houses in this country. Originally designed to provide sanitary facilities to the urban poor on congested areas of the city, the baths increasingly lost their clientale as private sanitary facilities became more commonplace in multi-family dwellings. Responding to these changes, the baths’ function shifted from providing simple sanitary facilities to the poor affording opportunities for neighborhood recreation.
DescriptionPublic Bath House #4 is sited on a corner lot at the intersection of Linden and Popular Streets and is surrounded by single and multi-family dwellings. Distinguished from the surrounding community by its brightly colored pastel stucco façade, Public Bath House #4's design blends classically inspired Renaissance detailing with the low-pitched tiled roof and planar surfaces characteristic of the Spanish Mission style. The six-bay-wide ground story façade of the main elevation is marked by a slightly projecting central gabled pavilion that features a large round-arched entrance ornamented with rusticated surround and crowned by a florid cartouche incorporating shell and swag motifs. The second story, which is set back from the ground story faced, is marked simply by sets of three round-arched niches contained sash windows with lintels placed on either side of the central pavilion. The large pool room remains substantially intact. The central feature of this area is a large plunge pool embellished with polychromed tile work executed in ornamental patterns.


PropertyYonkers Trolley Barn
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number92
Street AddressMain Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/29/02
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  03/19/02
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  01/29/02
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerRoyal Properties, Inc.
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectA.V. Porter
Builder
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsTransportation
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsRenaissance Revival
Current UseMulti Family Dwelling
Current Use, DetailsCommercial
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsTransportation
Structural ConditionGood
Neighborhood
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1903
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsA new door entry and window opening were constructed on Buena Vista Avenue. Masonry openings were rebuilt at the northwest corner, retaining the cast iron piers, but creating a new garage door entry and four window openings. The structure has recently been converted to a commercial and multi-family dwelling place called the Lofts at Metro92. A renovation was begun by the city of Yonkers and the Yonkers Downtown Waterfront Development Corporation and was completed by MetroPartners, a Yonkers-based firm.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Yonkers Trolley Barn is historically significant in the area of architecture as an imposing and unusual example of turn-of-the-century industrial architecture in Westchester County, and in the area of transportation as the most important and sole remaining building from the Yonkers trolley system. Designed by A.V. Porter and built in 1903 for the Yonkers Railroad Company, it is the last remaining trolley car barn in Westchester County and is representative of an important period in the transportation history of most major cities in the United States. The trolley barn was especially significant in the development of transportation in Yonkers as much of the city’s growth was due to the development of different types of mass transportation. The river, train, and trolley traffic all contributed to the development of Yonkers.
DescriptionThe Yonkers Trolley Barn, a massive Renaissance Revival brick building constructed in 1903, is located on the corner of Main Street and Buena Vista Avenue in the commercial section of Yonkers. The trolley barn is a three-story steel frame industrial building with massive masonry walls and an interior floor system of terra cotta arched supported by built-up lattice columns. The street elevations are decorated with a terra cotta water table with dentils, granite sill course, arches are true masonry and a stepped parapet. The exterior of the street elevations is constructed of extruded brown brick with iron spots in common bond and a rusticated brick base. At the second story there is a projecting continuous granite sill course supported by a terra cotta corbel. The third story has a granite sill course and round arched window openings above which is a terra cotta belt course. The main entrance to the trolley barn is located on the Main Street elevation. Many of the original interior finishes of the building have been cleared out. The structure has been converted to a commercial and multi-family dwelling place. For more details on the Yonkers Trolley Barn refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyYonkers Waterworks Buildings
MunicipalityYonkers
Community
Street Number
Street AddressSaw Mill River Road; Tuckahoe Road; Grassy Sprain Reservoir

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  07/21/82
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/01/82
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerCity of Yonkers
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsPublic Works
Architectural StyleHigh Victorian
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsPublic Works
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsPublic Works
Structural ConditionFair
Neighborhood
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1876, 1898
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe early buildings of the Yonkers municipal water works are historically and architecturally significant. The primary structures of the first public system established in Westchester County, the Tuckahoe Road Pump House, Grassy Sprain Reservoir Gate House and Tubewell Station were built of brick in the High Victorian style. Although only the Tuckahoe Road station retains its original function, the Victorian character of all remains intact, and the three masonry structures are symbolic of the nineteenth century growth and development of Westchester’s largest city.
DescriptionThe public water system of the city of Yonkers, the first municipal system in Westchester County, was established by popular vote in 1869. Thee extant water works structures, two constructed in 1876 and one in 1898, represent the early stages of the growth of the system and are architecturally and historically significant. The Tuckahoe Road Pump Station (1876), on the north side of Tuckahoe Road, is a red brick structure with a hipped slate roof and a dentilled galvanized iron cornice. Random coursed granite forms the building’s foundation beneath a stone water table on the main façade. The original section, three bays wide and three bays deep, has a central projecting pavilion on the main façade. A two-bay wide, three-bay deep addition to the east is detailed identically to the earlier section. The main building’s interior has a two-story high central space with a red quarry tile floor and white-edged-with-black ceramic tile wainscoting. The massive pumping machinery, dominating the main space, consists of three electric pumps and two diesel-operated engines. The second structure is the gate house at the Grassy Sprain Reservoir. Also constructed in 1876, the small one-story masonry building sits on a high granite foundation in the water near the dam at the southern end of the reservoir. Four control gates, designed to regulate the different levels of water flowing into the system, are contained within the foundation of the gate house. Decorative interest is provided by contrasting shades of light and dark red brick, the peaked slate roof, and the copper flashing and finial of the building’s main section. The Tubewell Station (1898) presently consists of two nearly identical masonry buildings with a central, smaller section linking the other two. The two main building are one and one half stories high, five bays wide, and thirteen bays deep, of red brick with contrasting stone trim. Stone is used for corner quoins, a water table, window and door sill, impost blocks, and high thin keystones set off by give brick soldier courses forming the opening arches. For more information on the Yonkers Waterworks Buildings refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


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