Thomas Paine Burial Plaque, New Rochelle

Photograph by Gray Williams

Historic Properties Listing

PropertyAngevine-Morris House
MunicipalityScarsdale
CommunityScarsdale
Street Number2
Street AddressBlack Walnut Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  08/02/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerMark and Gloria Bieler
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderJohn Hatfield
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1768
Structural SystemWood Frame, Interlocking Joints
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsIn 1800 the living room was added, in 1835 the library wing was added, the south wing was rebuilt in 1939 and the home was completely refurbished in 1986.
Date of Alterations1800, 1835, 1939, 1986

SignificanceThe entire building and site are significant because the original portion of this house, which illustrates 18th century building techniques, was constructed by John Hatfield, a Heathcote Manor tenant farmer. It was later occupied by Ely Angevine and was bought in 1858 by Lewis Gouveneur Morris, grandson of Richard Morris the first Chief Justice of the Colony of New York. The site is likely to possess archeological significance.
DescriptionThe Angevine-Morris House stands on a .9-acre site in a residential neighborhood in Scarsdale. The historic structure is an original two-story 1768 wood shingled gable roofed residence, in the center of the present house. The building was expanded in 1800 and 1935 and renovated in 1939 and 1986. The old portion, north end, still retains the appearance and flavor of the original house. The vertical alignment of fenestration and porch roof are notable. The interior was greatly changed except for the detailing around the old fireplace that is exposed, the narrow staircase, and the wide floorboards.


PropertyBoniface Water Tower
MunicipalityScarsdale
CommunityScarsdale
Street Number
Street AddressBetween 64 and 80 Garden Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  08/02/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerVillage of Scarsdale
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectSanborn and Bogert
Builder
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsWater supply standpipe
Architectural StyleNeo-Classic
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsWater supply standpipe
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsWater supply standpipe
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1929-30
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Boniface Water Tower is associated with the growth and development of the immediate area. Its appearance, resembling a defensive structure called Martello Tower (from a prototype standing at Cape Mortella in Corsica in 1794) is the result of the Village of Scarsdale efforts to appease property owners who objected to a water storage facility in a residential neighborhood. It is Westchester’s only known example of a Martello Tower and the only identified illustration of the work of the New York City engineering firm of Sanborn and Bogert.
DescriptionThe Boniface Water Tower is a 100-foot high masonry tower with Neoclassical exterior detail constructed in 1929-30 on a one and a half acre site. The metal standpipe inside contains 1,700,000 gallons of water. The spiral stairway inside the stone facing contains 155 7 _" steps. It is covered with masonry in the fashion of an English Martello Tower from Corsica.


PropertyBurgess House
MunicipalityScarsdale
CommunityScarsdale
Street Number3
Street AddressBurgess Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  08/02/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerSteven and Mary Jane Wolfram
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectHenry Bacon (1903 addition)
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleColonial
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1750
Structural SystemWood Frame, Light Members
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsA room and a south wing was added in 1815; an addition was added to the home in 1903. The house was modernized as well.
Date of Alterations1815, 1903, recent years

SignificanceThe Burgess House is an excellent local example of a vernacular eighteenth century residential building. The 1903 addition is the only Westchester example of the work of Henry Bacon, the architect of the Lincoln Memorial. Since the site has been continuously occupied for 240 years, it is likely to possess archaeological significance.
DescriptionThe Burgess House is a one-story, c. 1750 clapboard house on a stone foundation. It stands on a .9-acre site in a residential neighborhood in Scarsdale. The home was originally a long, narrow house one room wide, with a living room, dining room, and kitchen downstairs and three bedrooms upstairs. It was expanded to the south in 1815 and to the west in 1903. Notable features include hitching posts, wooden mounting block, and a well house. The earliest section illustrates heavy timber construction technology and retains many original and early details, including pedimented dormers, part of the original ovens, wide original floor boards, an overshot veranda roof, and a Dutch-style entrance door.


PropertyColonial Acres Cemetery
MunicipalityScarsdale
CommunityScarsdale
Street Number
Street AddressColonial Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  10/31/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerVillage of Scarsdale
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsCemetery
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsCemetery
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsCemetery
Structural ConditionFair
NeighborhoodDensely
Threats to BuildingVandalism
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1844
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceBrown, Scarsdale supervisor in 1829, set aside the land for the cemetery under the terms of his 1840 will. When Brown died in 1844 he was interred here and the cemetery was enclosed. Brown’s wife Anna is interred here as are representatives of the Merritt, Cornell, Morell, Griffen, and Purdy families, also of prominence and long standing in the community. The simplicity of the markers and character of the cemetery are illustrative of his important aspect of life in a Westchester village in the second half of the nineteenth century.
Description1.3-acre site, set aside and enclosed by a perimeter walls in 1844. Incorporates approximately 21 nineteenth-century graves. Headstones, of granite, marble or sandstone, are extremely simple, many marked only with a name and date of death. Located on land once part of the farm of Nathaniel Brown, the cemetery, now owned by the Village of Scarsdale, is separated from the extant c. 1800 Brown House by a mid-twentieth century housing development.


PropertyCrawford-Morris House
MunicipalityScarsdale
CommunityScarsdale
Street Number60
Street AddressCrane Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  10/31/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerBetty Nemeroff
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
BuilderSamuel Crawford
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1766
Structural SystemTimber Frame
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe house underwent a major restoration in 1949.
Date of Alterations1949

SignificanceThe Crawford-Morris house in significant for its architecture and occupants. The timber framing, and many details of the house, is essentially intact. The earliest portion of house was constructed in 1766 by Samuel Crawford on one hundred acres of land purchased by Crawford from Anne DeLancey and Martha Johnson, daughters of Caleb Heathcote. Crawford, one of two seconders of the July 9, 1776 motion for adoption of the Declaration of Independence by the State of New York and First Lieutenant of the Minute Men of White Plains, was killed in a skirmish with the British in Eastchester in 1777. His house was purchased and enlarged in 1788 by Richard Morris, who later became chief justice of the State of New York.
Description1.575-acre lot incorporates one-and-one-half story clapboard house on exposed stone foundation, gable roof, Carpenter Gothic eave brackets and vergeboards. Earliest portion of house constructed 1766; major addition, 1788; decorative detail, mid-to-late nineteenth century. There are nine fireplaces in the home, many of which have the original mantels and woodwork. Many of the wide floor boards still remain. The home is in a residential area of Scarsdale.


PropertyCudner-Hyatt House
MunicipalityScarsdale
CommunityScarsdale
Street Number937
Street AddressPost Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  01/22/73
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerScarsdale Historical Society
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsFarmhouse
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsHouse Museum
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1734
Structural SystemWood Frame, Interlocking Joints
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsThe Cudner-Hyatt House went through 13 years of exterior stabilization and interior restoration.
Date of Alterations1974-1987

SignificanceA simple clapboard dwelling, the Cudner-Hyatt House is one a few remaining landmarks representative of the early settlement of Scarsdale and Eastchester. The Cudner-Hyatt House, which dates from c. 1734, reflects the lives of the two families who lived in it for 232 years: the Cudners, from pre-Revolutionary War days until 1836, and the Hyatts, from 1836 to 1972. As Scarsdale changed from a farming community to a suburb, almost all of the 200-acres of land was sold off, but the family continued to own the house until it was purchased by the Scarsdale Historical Society in 1972. It is now a house museum.
DescriptionThe Cudner-Hyatt House is comprised of two adjoining structures that together form an angle of ninety degrees. The original dwelling, a small tenant house on farmland between the Hutchinson and Bronx Rivers was constructed facing south, with its east side parallel to the White Plains Post Road. The farmhouse stood one story in height until it was raised to two stories ca. 1836. Resting upon a stone foundation and measuring approximately two bays by one bay, the wood-frame structural system is sheathed by clapboards and envelops a central chimney. There are two windows on the east elevation, one at east story. Access to the interior is gained by means of a door near the eastern corner of the south or front elevation. A simple frame porch now shelters the entryway. The northern structure is believed to have been built prior to 1830. Standing two and a half stories high, two bays wide, and five bays long, the addition, like the old farmhouse, is composed of a structural system of wood framing erected upon a stone foundation and covered by clapboards. Distinctive elements of the interior include hardware, the remains of an old bake oven in the cellar of the original structure, and a curved wall that divides the entrance hall from the present dining room in the wing.


PropertyDonnybrook Lodge
MunicipalityScarsdale
CommunityScarsdale
Street Number2
Street AddressWeaver Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  10/31/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerArthur Backal and Tony Fortuna
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectArthur Loomis Harmon
Builder
Building TypeMixed Use
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsFrench Chateau
Current UseCommercial
Current Use, Details
Original UseMixed Use
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodCommercial
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1924
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThere was a major restoration on the Lodge in 1988.
Date of Alterations1988

SignificanceThe Lodge is the only Westchester County building thus far identified to have been designed by Arthur Loomis Harmon, architect for the prototypical New York City 1923-24 Shelton Towers Hotel and later a partner in the form of Shreve and Lamb, architects of the Empire State Building. The French Chateau style adds a pleasant flavor to this small commercial portion of Scarsdale. Originally called Donnybrook Lodge, its has been named Moras, Piedmont Inn, Bartholomews, Charlie Brown, Pippins, Heathcote Tavern, and is now Backals.
Description1.9-acre lot at major village intersection incorporates eclectic stucco and brick 1924 commercial building with a slate gable roofed main section, cupola-crowned round engaged entrance tower with conical roof, clad in slates that diminish in size from eaves to peak; wedge-shaped in conformance with lot, 7 bays deep on west façade, 6 bays wide at the rear façade. Large landscaped parking lot. Donnybrook Lodge, originally built as an apartment house with five apartments, a team room, and three stores was later converted to total commercial use. Architecturally distinctive on a prominent location, the building incorporates eclectic Neo-classical and Chateauesque detail in materials and at a scale appropriate to immediate context. Primarily intact on both exterior and interior, the Lodge features an unusual two-and-one-half story dining room with elaborate Northern European Renaissance Revival fireplace surround, balcony, and beamed and coffered ceiling, all carefully crafted of dark wood. Ceiling retains original stenciled decorative detail.


PropertyNathaniel Brown House
MunicipalityScarsdale
CommunityScarsdale
Street Number400
Street AddressMamaroneck Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  10/31/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerGladys Bushin
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleFederal
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1800
Structural SystemTimber Frame
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsRear wing added in 1840; interior changed c. 1950
Date of Alterations1840, c. 1950

SignificanceThe Nathaniel Brown House is architecturally significant as excellent local example of the vernacular Federal style. Brown, a locally prominent resident, was Scarsdale Supervisor in 1829; set aside in his 1840 will the land for what is now Colonial Acres Cemetery.
Description3.5-acre site with two story, gambrel roofed wood shingle c. 1800 residence. Main façade incorporates intact characteristic entrance surround with pilasters supporting full entablature, paneled wood door flanked by sidelights and surmounted by transom; tripartite central window at second level. Heavy timber framing visible in attic; original decorative plaster cornice moldings survive in primary interior spaces. Site, continuously occupied for nearly two hundred years, has strong archeological potential.


PropertyScarsdale Post Office
MunicipalityScarsdale
CommunityScarsdale
Street Number
Street AddressChase Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  05/11/89
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/11/89
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  05/11/89
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerUnited States Postal Service, Northeast Region
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectLeonard Schultze and Weaver
Builder
Building TypeGovernment
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleNeo-Classic
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseGovernment
Current Use, Details
Original UseGovernment
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodCommercial
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1937-38
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe main entrance doors and stair railings have been replaced. The original screenline has been replaced, modern lockboxes have been added, and there is a modern Formica detail on the walls.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Scarsdale Post Office is architecturally significant as a distinguished example of a restrained Neoclassical style public building in New York State. The building was authorized in 1931 as part of the extensive public buildings programs initiated by the federal government in response to the unemployment caused by the Great Depression. It was designed in 1931 by Leonard Schultze and Weaver and constructed in 1937-38. Although a small number of architects in private practice were hired as consultants to the Office of the Supervising Architect of the Treasury, very few New York State post offices were designed outside of the office between 1935 and 1943. The unique design of the building is distinguished by the juxtaposition of three volumes of different size, an elegant columned entrance portico and simple but handsome classically derived detailing. The use of restrained classical forms had become the norm for port office designs of this period in New York State, although the Scarsdale Post Office is more refined in its detail and ornamentation than most other post offices constructed in the mid-1930s. In addition to the building’s architectural importance, it is artistically significant in that it contains two well-preserved murals painted in 1940 by Gorden Samstag under the auspices of the Treasury Department’s Section of Fine Arts. The Scarsdale Post Office has been well maintained and retains most of its original integrity. It continues to be an imposing symbol of the federal presence in the wealthy community of Scarsdale.
DescriptionThe Scarsdale Post Office is located on the northwest side of Chase Road between Spencer Place and Woodlawn Road in Scarsdale. The building is sited within the commercial center of this suburban community. The post office is a symmetrically massed red brick building with limestone trim. The building is composed of a central two-story rectangular block flanked by one-story wings. To the rear rises a wing containing the workroom. The main block contains a three-bay-wide recessed limestone portico supported by a pair of tall slender Doric columns. The main entrance, with its modern double doors, is reached by a slight of stairs with bronze railings added in 1952. The portico supports a limestone frieze, carved with the words "United States Post Office," and a parapet, both of which run around the entire central block. The large rear section of the building is recessed from the end wings but is much higher. The lobby is entered through a wooden vestibule with large glass panes. The lobby has Westfield green marble wainscoting and a green and white terrazzo floor with a geometric pattern. The upper walls, cornice, and ceiling are plaster. Original detail includes the customers’ table with brass appointments, bulletin boards, and hanging lamps with glass globes and brass rings. The murals "Caleb Heathcote Buys the Richbell Farm" and "Law and Order in Old Scarsdale" hang on the north and south walls.


PropertyScarsdale Railroad Station
MunicipalityScarsdale
CommunityScarsdale
Street Number
Street AddressDepot Circle @ Popham Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  04/05/00
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  07/27/00
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  04/05/00
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerLocal Gov't
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectGrant Nichols
Builder
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsRailroad Station
Architectural StyleTudor Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsRailroad Station
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsRailroad Station
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodCommercial
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1902
Structural SystemTimber Frame
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Scarsdale Railroad Station, built in 1902, is architecturally significant as a distinctive example of early 20th century railroad architecture in Westchester County. The building illustrates the importance of the railroads in the county in the early part of the twentieth century when they provided the main long distance transportation. It was primarily due to the introduction of the railroad that the Village of Scarsdale was quickly transformed from a primarily agricultural and summer vacation area to a year round residential community that connected to the New York City commercial area. Demand for access to New York City in Westchester County greatly increased after the introduction of a second track in the early part of the twentieth century, and the present building was built in response to the demand, replacing the original wood frame station.
DescriptionThe Scarsdale Railroad Station, a Tudor Revival building constructed in 1902, is located on the east boundary of the main commercial and shopping area of the Village of Scarsdale. It is bounded by the Bronx River Parkway on the east, which provides it with a strong wooded edge. The station is a one-story, gable roofed "L" shaped stucco and half-timbered structure. The building features a pronounced masonry base course that extends to 4’-0" from grade and strongly anchors the building to the site. The main entrance is positioned under a protected covered area that accentuates the main access into the building. The windows have fixed six-light transoms over 18-light fixed lower sash. The main entrance is surrounded by divided light transoms and sidelights. The main architectural feature of the building is its prominent aquamarine green clay tile roof, which strongly defines the building and gives it its primary identity. Two brick chimneys project from the roof. The station has a covered waiting area extending the building to the north; parallel to the tracks. Along the tracks there is now a high level concrete platform that partially obscures the east elevation of the station. The interior of the station retains many original features. The main waiting room in the southern section of the building has a plaster ceiling, glazed cream-colored brick walls with wood wainscoting, a quarry tile floor, a fireplace on the west wall, and the original ticket counter. Continuous wood benches with cast iron seats dividers surround the room. The doors are mostly replacements. In the northern section of the building are the ticket office, other offices, and bathrooms.


PropertyScarsdale Volunteer Ambulance Corps Building
MunicipalityScarsdale
CommunityScarsdale
Street Number300
Street AddressHeathcote Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  10/31/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerVillage of Scarsdale
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectReed and Stem
Builder
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsRailroad Station
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsNeo-Italian Renaissance
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsAmbulance Corps
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsRailroad Station
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodCommercial
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1912
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsMost of the station was remodeled in 1939. Minor alterations in 1971.
Date of Alterations1939, 1971

SignificanceConstructed in 1912 as the Heathcote Station of the New York, Westchester, and Boston Railroad, the only one of Westchester's three primary rail lines built expressly to serve the county. Incorporating numerous technical innovations, the New York, Westchester, and Boston was the first main-line railroad in America to be designed and built as an electric line. All stations of the line were designed by the architectural firm of Reed and Stem, responsible, with the firm of Warren and Wetmore, for Grand Central Terminal. Representative of the modified Neo-Italian Renaissance style used on this branch of the line, the Heathcote Station, one of only five of the original 24 New York, Westchester, and Boston stations remaining in the county, is the most intact of the group and the only illustration of this style. Doomed by the unfortunate assumption that the center of New York City would continue to move north and the consequent location of the line terminus in the Bronx, the line ended service on December 31, 1937. The building was acquired by the village of Scarsdale in 1943 and became the home of the Volunteer Ambulance Corps in 1971.
DescriptionThe Scarsdale Volunteer Ambulance Corps Building is a stuccoed concrete one-and-one-half story structure with a ceramic tile gable roof, built in the Neo-Italian Renaissance style. The building lays on a one-half acre site and is located in a commercial section of Scarsdale.


PropertyUnderhill House
MunicipalityScarsdale
CommunityScarsdale
Street Number1020
Street AddressPost Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  10/31/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerBarbara Shay Curran (MacDonald)
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
BuilderBenjamin Underhill (c. 1760 addition)
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleColonial Dutch
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1700
Structural SystemWood Frame, Interlocking Joints
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsOriginal Dutch house (1687?) central. Underhill house added 1760. 1730 Dutch Springhouse moved from original site overspring and added in 1790.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Underhill House is the earliest extant house in Scarsdale. Continuously occupied for nearly 300 years, the site, which retains an early well, spring, and spring-fed pong, has yielded pottery shards identified as seventeenth century and has strong additional archeological potential.
Description1.9-acre site incorporating one story, gable roofed, wood shingled eighteenth century house; stone retaining walls; spring-fed pond, garage. The Underhill House, consisting of the center original c. 1700 section, the second, west, c. 170 section, constructed by Benjamin Underhill, and the third, east, portion, added c. 1790, is the earliest extant house in Scarsdale. Incorporating physical characteristics of seventeenth and eighteenth century vernacular residential architecture, including mortise-and-tenon construction, exposed hand-hewn beams, wood frame and sash double hung twelve-over-twelve windows, and four-light transoms above Dutch-type doors, the house also features unusual large corner fireplaces. Some of the original exterior gable shingles, approximately 18" in length, remain in place on the c. 1700 central section and are visible from the attic of the c. 1760 addition.


PropertyWayside Cottage
MunicipalityScarsdale
CommunityScarsdale
Street Number1039
Street AddressPost Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/01/81
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  03/09/81
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerVillage of Scarsdale
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsOrganizational, Museum
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1720
Structural SystemMetal
Structural System, DetailsSome timber remains
Photograph Available?Yes
Alterations(Information from: http://www.scarsdalehistory.org/PDFs/waysidestory.htm - published by the Junior League of Central Westchester, Inc.) Much costly restoration and renovation was done by the Junior League before Wayside could be used as its headquarters and as a meeting place for other organizations of the village. Partitions on the first floor were taken out in order to create one large meeting room which is called the Emily Butler Room. The flooring and underflooring were removed in order to install concrete beams and slabs, sleepers and underflooring. Antique boards obtained from Rhode Island and Connecticut were laid on top and then the boards were washed, hand sanded, and a beeswax and paste wax finish put on them. A fireplace which the Library had boarded up on the north wall was rediscovered and an antique mantel installed over it. The ceiling was repaired, the entire south end of the building rewired, wainscoting extended around the room, and it was painted along with the entire outside of the building. A partition was relocated in the kitchen; plumbing, linoleum and equipment were installed, and the room was painted. One window in the Stack Room, an addition built by the Library, was removed and a fire door installed. A soundproof ceiling and new lighting were added. The Stack Room was later decorated as a colonial sitting room and has recently been renamed the Tompkins Room after a prominent local family. The Harvey Birch Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, completely renovated the room, formerly the Children's Library. It was renamed the Harvey Birch Room in honor of Cooper's "Spy" and his activities in this part of the county. The original fieldstone fireplace was restored by removal of the bricks and plaster, revealing the poplar lintel above and the oven inside. A British half penny dated 1746 fell out of the nibble above the lintel. In this room the ceiling and tile floor of the bathroom above were removed and old beams exposed. The room has been restored and equipped with furnishings appropriate to the pre-Revolutionary age of the building. A hand rail was installed on the stairs and a door at the top of them. Two upstairs bedrooms were repaired, papered and painted. In the first bedroom a triangular closet was discovered with a space behind it so that one could climb up to the attic and down to the Harvey Birch Room beside the chimney. In the Woman's Club Bulletin of 1919 it says, "There was a secret chamber which could be entered by lifting the riser of the step going up to the center bedroom (now the bathroom). This has since been opened into a closet." Another source states that in the attic in a niche beside the chimney a tiny brick stair led to a tunnel under Post Road which was a means of escape. Yet another account declares that the tunnel went under Butler Field. It is possible that there were two tunnels to which access was obtained by going down alongside the central chimney. This bedroom has been recently restored to a colonial sitting room by funds collected for the Jane W. Hackett Memorial Fund. Mrs. Hackett, at the time of her death, was Scarsdale's Village Historian, and the room has been named and dedicated in her honor. A great deal of the restoration of Wayside Cottage has been accomplished by hard working League volunteers. Restoration, continued renovation and yearly maintenance has been costly. To date, over $150,000.00 has been spent by the Junior League on the Cottage.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Wayside Cottage in Scarsdale, the earliest portion constructed around 1720, is the community's oldest building and one of its most important historic resources. The pre-Revolutionary farmhouse, a familiar landmark, is located on the Central Post Road, and was also the scene of Revolutionary War skirmishes. Owners of the property have included Caleb Heathcote, the first Lord of the Manor of Scarsdale, and three generations of Varians, a locally prominent family. Although the building’s configuration has been changed over the years to meet the needs of its occupants, and some alterations have been made, the pattern of expansion is clear and much early fabric remains. Since 1919 Wayside Cottage has been a community-oriented property, and is now the custodial responsibility of the Junior League of Central Westchester, the group responsible for most of its restoration.
DescriptionWayside Cottage, located on approximately two-thirds of an acre on the Central Post Road in Scarsdale, is an early eighteenth-century historically significant building. Situated close to the Post Road, the house is separated from this main thoroughfare by a small front lawn and white picket fence. Evidence indicated that the earliest portion of the house, the four-bay wide, two-bay deep, and one-and-one-half story section on the south, was constructed largely in two parts during the first half of the eighteenth century. Painted white with black trim, the exterior sheathing on the main façade is of large round-end shingles with three rows of clapboards directly under the roof. The south and west facades are clapboard. This section sites on a fieldstone foundation and has a gable roof of asphalt shingles with two brick chimneys; the roof extension over the veranda on the east is supported by four piers with simple Doric capitals. Fenestration consists of, on the main façade, two floor-to-ceiling "French door" type windows, one six-over-six window with wood sash, two small six-paned horizontal windows, and the main entrance door. The south façade has a plain fascia below a slight overhang. On the west, the exterior sheathing is also of clapboard, but more recent than on the south. The center section of the house, constructed in 1828, consists of a two-and-one-half story, three-bay wide structure with a gable roof, sheathed in white clapboards. The entrance door is paneled. The interior of Wayside Cottage shows clear evidence of the early methods used in its construction. For more information on Wayside Cottage refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


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