Mead Homestead, Waccabuc

Photograph by Gray Williams

Historic Properties Listing

PropertyBush-Lyon Homestead
MunicipalityTown of Rye
CommunityPort Chester
Street Number479
Street AddressKing Street (Lyon Memorial Park)

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  04/22/82
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  03/01/82
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerVillage of Port Chester
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleSalt Box
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsMuseum
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1720
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Bush-Lyon Homestead was built in the first quarter of the eighteenth century and is one of Port Chester’s oldest buildings. Located on King Street (laid out in 1682), the homestead property was part of the area's first settlement. The farmhouse and surrounding land were owned by members of the locally prominent Bush and Lyon families. Although major additions have changed the configuration of the original house, many historic features survive. The homestead is one of the community's most important historic resources.
DescriptionThe Bush-Lyon Homestead (c. 1720) is situated in John Lyon Park on King Street in Port Chester. The earliest portion of the main building consisted of a one and one-half story, five-bay-wide by two-bay-deep residence with a center stone chimney. Exterior sheathing consists of white-painted shingles and clapboards. The windows, both twelve-over-twelve and six-over-six, appear to be original. The first major addition to the house probably consisted of a rear wing. In addition, the rafters were raised and the structure was given its saltbox configuration. Shortly before 1800, a kitchen wing was added to the east of the earlier sections. The house was changed twice in the nineteenth century: the first time with a new section filling in the space of the "L" plan created by the kitchen wing, and the second with a gable-roofed, one-story wing extending to the north. All the roofs are covered with wood shingles; all windows have shutters and most are louvered. The interior has many historic features including wide floorboards and simple baseboards, door and window surrounds on the first floor. Of particular interest are the fireplace walls in each parlor, which have raised and fielded paneling. For more details on the Bush-Lyon Homestead refer to the files at the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyCapitol Theatre
MunicipalityTown of Rye
CommunityPort Chester
Street Number147-151
Street AddressWestchester Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  06/07/84
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  05/01/84
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerMarvin Ravikoff
Institutional OwnerTelco Holding Corp.
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectThomas W. Lamb
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsTheater
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsRenaissance
Current UseCommercial
Current Use, Details
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsTheater
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodCommercial
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1926
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
Alterations"Entrepeneur Marvin Ravikoff purchased the Capitol and began renovations while trying to find a format for running it. Stage plays and concerts proved unsuccessful, so the Capitol is now a catering and special-events facility. The upstairs seating has been retained, but the orchestra floor is now open space for dining, dancing, and trade shows." Information from http://cinematreasures.org/theater/6780/.
Date of Alterations1983

SignificanceThe Capitol Theatre in Port Chester is the best remaining example in Westchester County of the work of Thomas W. Lamb, who was the acknowledged master of elaborate movie theater architecture during its golden age, the early twentieth century. The theater building, constructed in 1926, brought to the community a combination of modern office and commercial space and an auditorium, designed primarily for the showing of motion pictures, capable of seating over 1800. Although changes in economics and the environment caused the nature of the entertainment to change and the building ultimately to be abandoned for a time, the Capitol Theatre has retained much of its exterior and interior architectural integrity. The structure, now rehabilitated, continues to play a significant role in the life of the local community and is Westchester’s finest remaining representative of the era of movie "palaces."
DescriptionThe Capitol Theatre, designed by Thomas W. Lamb, is located in Port Chester’s central business district. Two attached buildings make up the property. The first, which fronts on Westchester Avenue, has three storefronts, the main entrance to the theater, and the second story office space. The second unit, which fronts on Broad Street, contains the theatre itself. The first, two-story, building unit has a truncated hip roof with parapet walls, skylights, and a stepped false rear façade, and is nine bays wide and four bays deep. The main façade has a terra cotta cornice with decorated brackets, dentils, egg-and-dart and other moldings, and terra cotta decorative elements. The large marquee hangs at the eastern half of the main façade. The second building unit, the theatre, ranges from 4 to 7 stories and is approximately 10 bays wide and 18 bays deep. It has a buff color brick exterior with both regular and Flemish bonds. The vestibule of the theatre is entered through a bank of ten brass doors. A ticket booth is recessed into the west wall. The foyer, a narrow two-story space, has murals and mirrors. The auditorium is entered through arched doorways. The orchestra seating area is divided by four aisles and ends before the stage in an orchestra pit. The state itself is 28’ deep, with a skylight 59’ high ceiling. Five levels of dressing rooms are tiered on either side of the backstage area. Two sets of boxes, three boxes per side, flank the stage. Arch decoration consists of repeated Renaissance motifs with twisted pilasters and square decorative panels in a variety of scales. For more details on the Capitol Theatre refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyLife Savers Building
MunicipalityTown of Rye
CommunityPort Chester
Street Number
Street AddressNorth Main Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  07/11/85
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  05/21/85
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerCollins Development Corporation
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectLockwood, Greene, and Co.
BuilderLockwood, Greene, and Co.
Building TypeIndustrial
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsChicago
Current UseMulti Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseIndustrial
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1920
Structural SystemMetal
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsThe Life Savers Building was converted into condominiums in the 1980s. The original larger-than-life Life Saver rolls were removed.
Date of Alterations1980s

SignificanceThe Life Savers Building is significant as a distinguished example of early twentieth century industrial architecture in Westchester County and for its association with one of the most famous and enduring American brands of candy, the "Life Saver." Designed and built by the noted industrial engineering firm of Lockwood, Greene, and Co. in 1920, the structure embodies distinctive characteristics of early concrete construction technology and contemporary eclectic architectural design. The incorporation of "Life Savers" imagery in the ornamentation of the principal facades reflects the expanding role of product identification in corporate design, particularly as innovative packaging and promotion contributed enormously to "Life Saves" candies’ commercial success.
DescriptionThe Life Savers Building is located at the northern edge of the central business district at the intersection of Horton Avenue and North Main Street in Port Chester. Five stories high, the first a rusticated raised basement, the original, 1920 section of the Life Savers Building is irregular in plan, nine bays wide and four bays deep, with a flat roof and a bracketed wood and ceramic tile canopy at the rooflines of three façades. The 1948 addition, which extended the earlier portion to the north by two bays and increased the overall depth of the building by five bays, is nearly identical to the original section with the exception of the canopy absent above the five added bays on the west façade. The building is constructed of concrete with terra cotta detail and some facades of concrete and Roman brick. The concrete has been stuccoed in modern times. Exterior decorative details include rust and cream colored replicas of individual Life Savers candies above the windows and a terra cotta "Life Savers" plaque. Larger-than-life replicas of Life Savers rolls at the foundation line once bordered the building. After the Life Savers Corporation moved its headquarters away from Port Chester in 1984, the structure was converted to condominiums. For more details on the Life Savers Building refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyMerritt House
MunicipalityTown of Rye
CommunityRye Brook
Street Number129
Street AddressNorth Ridge Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  03/20/89
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerMichael and Susan Wein
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleSalt Box
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1750
Structural SystemOther (describe)
Structural System, DetailsMortise and tenon
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThere was a rear two story addition added in 1970 and the main porch was enclosed in 1979.
Date of Alterations1970; 1979

SignificanceThe Merritt House is the oldest house on what is now Ridge Street, noted by Charles Baird, History of Rye, as a well-traveled Town of Rye thoroughfare as early as 1680. Owned during the nineteenth century by members of the Merritt and Lyon families, prominent for generations in the Town of Rye and in neighboring Greenwich, Connecticut, the eighteenth century house has been continuously occupied for over 240 years and is likely to have strong archeological significance.
DescriptionThe Merritt House is located on North Ridge Street in the village of Rye Brook in a residential neighborhood. Constructed in the traditional New England saltbox configuration, the gable-roofed building retains much original material including, on the exterior, six-over-six and three-over-three wood frame and sash single hung windows with simple surrounds, many with louvered shutters on iron pintles; twelve-inch rounded end or fish scale shingles on the side façade; wide eaves with returns, large central chimney, brick over the roof line, fieldstone below; and the double-glazed three-light transom above the original main entrance. A rear two-story addition was added in 1970, which has an asphalt shingled roof. The original section has a slate roof. On the interior, remaining early elements include exposed hand-hewn mortise-and-tenon framing; wide floorboards; beaded paneling; and narrow winding staircases to the second level and cellar. There are three operating main floor fireplaces; one retains the original bluestone hearth and a warming over, all have unusual delicately carved mantels and surrounds of pine. Also on the property is a slate-covered gable roofed garage, two interior blacktopped drives, a low dressed stone retaining wall, and mature trees.


PropertyPort Chester Post Office
MunicipalityTown of Rye
CommunityPort Chester
Street Number245
Street AddressWestchester Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  05/11/89
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/11/89
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  05/11/89
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerUnited States Postal Service, Northeast Region
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectZoller and Muller
Builder
Building TypeGovernment
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleColonial Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseGovernment
Current Use, Details
Original UseGovernment
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1932-3; 1936
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Port Chester Post Office is architecturally significant as an extremely fine and intact example of the federal architecture erected as part of the public works projects initiated by the United States government during the Great Depression of the 1930s. The building is an imposing and well-executed example of the Colonial Revival style and reflects the ascendancy of this style as the most popular for federal buildings of the 1920s and 1930s. The Port Chester Post Office is also significant for its ornate interior lobby and for its artwork. The post office contains one of the most extensive mural cycles of the period. This group of four large murals and nine lunettes was commissioned by the Treasury Relief Act Program for Domenico Mortellito and was installed in 1936.
DescriptionThe Port Chester Post Office is located at 245 Westchester Avenue between Oak Street and Haseco Avenue in a mixed-use area of Port Chester. The building is a symmetrically massed, one-story structure faced with brick laid in Flemish bond and trimmed with limestone and granite. The building rests on a high rusticated granite base. The focus of the front façade is a projecting central pavilion with a shallow portico composed of two pairs of limestone Corinthian columns echoed by limestone Corinthian pilasters. The main entrance to the post office is set within a monumental round arch. The actual entrance is through a pair of slightly projecting bronze doors with glazed insets. To either side of the entrance pavilion are three-bay-wide brick wings marked by brick quoins. Each of the tall compound round-arched openings contains a window with a twelve-over-twelve casement sash with a wide central vertical mullion and a fixed multi-paned fanlight. The building is crowned by a brick parapet with balustrade panels and a hip roof. The post office is entered through a sizeable vestibule with a high domed ceiling and shell niches in the sidewalls. The lobby is almost entirely intact. Around the perimeter of the room is a gray marble dado reaching to counter height. The plaster ceiling is vaulted and has large coffers and three glazed areas. Original lamps hang from the ceiling. The floors are beige and gray terrazzo and marble laid in a geometric pattern with narrow brass joints. All four walls contain murals placed in the building in 1936. For more details on the Port Chester Post Office refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyPutnam and Mellor Engine/Hose Company Firehouse
MunicipalityTown of Rye
CommunityPort Chester
Street Number46
Street AddressMain Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  09/15/83
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  08/10/83
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerVillage of Port Chester
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectHoward G. Slater
BuilderW.A. Thomas
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsFire Station
Architectural StyleQueen Anne
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsDemolished
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsFire Station
Structural ConditionDeteriorated
NeighborhoodCommercial
Threats to BuildingStructure has been demolished
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1888
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificancePutnam and Mellor Engine and Hose Company, the oldest fire company in continuous operation in the village of Port Chester, is located in a late nineteenth century, architecturally significant building. The firehouse is a representative, largely unchanged example of a simplified Queen Anne civic building, and is a conspicuous local landmark. The structure has provided spaced for many community activities.
DescriptionThe Putnam and Mellor Engine and Hose Company Firehouse is a three-story, three-bay-wide, rectangular masonry structure. It incorporates numerous characteristics of the Queen Anne style, including irregular massing, textured surfaces, and a varied roofline. Primarily of red brick, the firehouse has stone stringcourses separating the man façade’s floors. Terra cotta decoration is used extensively on the main façade in a few locations. It has been modified several times at street level. The size and style of the door openings was altered. The firehouse’s low hip roof is punctuated by two decorative gable ends that flank a center gabled dormer. The sidewalls, originally blocked from view, are now exposed. The north wall, partially stuccoed, has a small brick addition containing a passage and stairway, and various bricked up window openings. Interior details of note include: pressed-tin ceilings on first and second floor, and ornate cast-iron stair railing, and wainscoting and woodwork and first and second floor. Unfortunately, the structure was demolished on November 17, 2007 when it engineers told the Village of Port Chester that the building was in danger of collapse. For more information refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertySpanish American War Memorial
MunicipalityTown of Rye
CommunityPort Chester
Street Number
Street AddressWillett, King, and Pearl Streets

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  03/20/89
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerVillage of Port Chester
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectLouis J. Settino
BuilderKarl Illava; Luigi Del Bianco
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsMemorial
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsMemorial
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsMemorial
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1937
Structural SystemN/A
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Spanish American War Memorial is significant because it serves as a remembrance to local residents who served the United States of America in the War. Many local individuals were instrumental in the conception, design and implementation of the memorial, including Odgen Reid of Purchase, who donated the Vermon granite; Louis Settino of Port Chester, who designed it; Karl Illava of Greenwich, sculptor off the statue, and Luigi Del Bianco, sculptor of the granite platform, shafts, and statue base, who had worked on the Mount Rushmore Memorial in South Dakota. Gutzon Borglum, designed and principal sculptor of Mount Rushmore, was a Port Chester resident in the 1930s and supervised all aspects of the memorial's construction. The memorial was funded by the Works Progress Administration as a federal art project and was completed on November 9, 1927 and dedicated on April 24, 1938.
DescriptionThe Spanish American War Memorial (1937) is located in Summerfield Park at the intersection of Willett, Pearl, and King Streets near the center of the village of Port Chester. The park is on a triangular plot of land and includes a dark green wrought iron perimeter fence, which is open at the apex of the triangle. The Spanish American War monument, at the south end of the path, consists of a stepped platform of pale Vermont granite, which is centered on a square granite shaft supporting a bronze statue of an American solider, head bent, rifle in hand. Smaller granite shafts bearing bronze plaques on which are engraved the names of Port Chester people who served in the Spanish American War punctuate the platform corners. Also in the .14-acre park is a monument commemorating sinking of the U.S.S. Maine in Havana Harbor. This monument consists of a shaft of pale granite bearing a cannon shell and a bronze plaque memorializing Newell Rising, a Port Chester resident who went down with the ship.


PropertySt. Peter's Episcopal Church
MunicipalityTown of Rye
CommunityPort Chester
Street Number19
Street AddressSmith Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  03/03/06
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/08/06
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  03/03/06
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectA. Page Brown
Builder
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1889-90
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsIn 1896, the chancel/sanctuary was enlarged. A massive rod beam, extending across the chancel to the church, was installed in the early 1920s. In 1975, a larger, freestanding altar was installed near the end of the chancel.
Date of Alterations1896; 1920s; 1975

SignificanceSt. Peter’s Episcopal Church is significant in the area of architecture as a distinctive and intact example of eclectic late-19th century religious architecture in Westchester County. Designed by well-known architect A. Page Brown and built in 1889, the stone and brick building exhibits characteristics of the Norman, Tudor, and Gothic styles, with its Norman arched openings, Tudor-derived turret and castellated parapet, and Gothic buttresses. St. Peter's is described in Frank E. Sanchis’ American Architecture: Westchester County, NY, as a classic example of a neo-gothic revival church. The church retains a high degree of integrity on the exterior and interior. In addition to its architectural significance, St. Peter’s also plays an important role in the Port Chester community by offering many organizations and programs on the site.
DescriptionSt. Peter's Episcopal Church, built in 1889-90, is located on a rise on the south side of Westchester Avenue in the village of Port Chester. It was built to replace the original church, built in the 1940s and destroyed by a fire in December of 1883. It is approximately 126’ x 60’. Its exterior of bluestone, gray limestone and brick with a slate roof combines Norman, Tudor, and Gothic styles. To the right of the main doors, on the northwest corner is a large square clock tower, which also serves as a porte-cochere. A narrow faced turret is appended to one side. The church is entered through two sets of double wood doors in the front and one set on the right side that opens into a large vestibule. The church proper is entered through one of three sets of double wood doors. The nave, beneath a high wood vaulted ceiling, contains 16 rows of wood pews on either side of the main aisle and ten Tiffany grisaille windows, five on each side. The altar rail at the foot of the nave, also furnished by Tiffany, is polished brass. There is a stone baptismal font and a brass lectern on the left side of the nave. In 1896 the chancel/sanctuary was enlarged. The chancel floor is laid in marble mosaic and the steps leading into it are Knoxville marble. To the left is the Memorial Chapel, which displays a large Tiffany window portraying the Ascension of Christ over the main altar. The parish hall, built in the 1920s, is connected to the church. For more details on St. Peter's Episcopal Church refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyWar Memorial
MunicipalityTown of Rye
CommunityPort Chester
Street Number
Street AddressWesley and Westchester Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  10/31/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerVillage of Port Chester
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectMcKim, Mead, and White
BuilderThomas Hudson Jones
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsMemorial Park
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsMemorial Park
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsMemorial Park
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1930-31; 1964
Structural SystemN/A
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Port Chester War Memorial commemorates World War I, World War II, and the Korean War, events that significantly impacted the community and the country and honors local residents who participated in these events. The site is illustrative of the public memorial category of work of a noted architectural firm of McKim, Mead, and White and the talent of the sculptor, Thomas Hudson Jones.
DescriptionThe Port Chester War Memorial is located between the intersection of Wesley and Westchester Avenues and North Regent Street. The .068-acre site incorporates a 10’8" high bronze statue on a bronze-trimmed pedestal of Conway green polished granite and benches of Deer Isle granite, surrounded by lawns, gravel paths, mature trees and hedges, all part of World War I memorial. The World War II and Korean War memorial consists of a flagpole on a square granite base with engraved bronze plaques on all sides.


PropertyWilliam E. Ward House
MunicipalityTown of Rye
CommunityRye Brook
Street Number
Street AddressComly Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  11/07/76
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerWinifred Ward
Institutional Ownerc/o Westchester Country Club
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectWilliam Ward and Robert Mook
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsGothic Revival and French, Second Empire
Current Use
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionFair
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1873-76
Structural SystemConcrete
Structural System, DetailsMetal
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsThree additions in the early twentieth century provided more living space.
Date of AlterationsEarly 1900s

SignificanceSituated on a picturesque site overlooking the Byram River, the Ward House is believed to be the first residence built entirely of reinforced concrete in the United States. Built during the years 1873 and 1876 by William Ward, a mechanical engineer, in collaboration with Robert Mook, a New York City architect, the residence reflects Ward's determination to build a fireproof building using only Portland cement and lightweight iron "I" beams and rods. The undertaking was widely publicized when it was completed as a monument to the technological and engineering skills of William Ward. Today, scholars view the engineering feat in concrete and iron as an early prototype of what later became common architectural practice.
DescriptionWard's "Castle" is located in the neighborhood of Glenville near the Byram River, not far from the New York-Connecticut state line. Dramatically situated on a hill and overlooking the Long Island Sound in the distance, the large, picturesque residence, constructed entirely of reinforced concrete, manifests stylistic elements from both the Gothic Revival and French, Second Empire styles. The structural composition is dominated by a large, octagonal tower with parapet and machicolations on the southeast corner that rises four stories. A smaller, three story, square tower is attached to the back elevation. A large porch extends from the dining room on the east side to the drawing room on the south side. The main entrance faces south and opens onto the veranda near the base of the large, octagonal, corner tower. The main block of the structure is covered with a mansard roof with classically inspired dormers and a modillion cornice. The corners of the exterior walls are heavily quoined. A central hall, drawing room, reception room, dining room, breakfast room, and sunroom comprise the first floor. The latter two rooms are twentieth century additions. A two-story service wing is attached on the north elevations. The second story has three bedrooms, a large central hall, and the "Elizabethan" library with elaborate period woodwork. The third story contains more bedrooms, a central hall, and storage rooms.


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