Anna and Abraham Ladew, Scarborough

Photograph by Gray Williams

Historic Properties Listing

PropertyBolton Priory
MunicipalityPelham
CommunityPelham Manor
Street Number7
Street AddressPriory Lane

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  06/28/74
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerMs. Harry George
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectRobert Bolton, Washington Irving
BuilderRobert Bolton and sons
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsEarly Gothic Revival
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1838
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsRestored after a fire in the early twentieth century, the addition of an attic story is the most significant changed from the early appearance of the Priory.
Date of AlterationsEarly 20th century

SignificanceBolton Priory (1838) is a particularly fine reflection of the life style and tastes of a cultivated influential family in mid-19th century rural Pelham as well as the romantic theories of architectural design then emerging in America. The building was originally the home of Robert Bolton, a minister at St. Paul’s in Eastchester, that also housed religious services and later served school for girls (which is believed to have been the first public school in Pelham). In addition, Washington Irving, a close friend of Robert Bolton, was intimately associated with the plans for the dwelling that Robert Bolton and his sons constructed. For more information on the significance of Bolton Priory refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.
DescriptionBolton Priory stands upon a wooded tract, overlooking Pelham Bay. The once large estate of Robert Bolton is now diminished to 3.7 acres but the plot still retains the old formal gardens. A stone and brick structure, the Priory is composed of a variety of geometric forms, asymmetrically arranged to produce a highly picturesque silhouette as well as the illusion that the dwelling is the product of natural growth over a period of many years. The house is, in fact, composed of a long two-story block intersected by a gabled two-story wing, with a crenellated four-story octagonal tower at the northern angle of that junction and a crenellated three-story square brick tower at the southwestern end of the main block. The main block that is covered by a gable roof for about two-thirds of its length, was originally crenellated for the remainder of its length. However, early in the 20th century a third story was added to this segment of the house now covered by a hipped roof. The exterior and interior remain essentially unaltered in form. The interior contains 39 rooms. The craftsmanship attributed to Robert Bolton’s sons is exhibited in the richly detailed woodwork such as mantels and built-in bookcases.


PropertyChrist Church at Pelham
MunicipalityPelham
CommunityPelham Manor
Street Number1415
Street AddressPelhamdale Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  03/20/89
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerParish of Christ the Redeemer
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectRobert Bolton and sons
BuilderRobert Bolton and sons
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodCommercial/ Woodlands
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1843
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe Nanette Bolton Memorial Building was constructed to the east of the church in 1885; in 1910 the church was considerably enlarged, the nave turned from north/south to east/west, and the chancel extended to intersect with the Memorial Building. The Hall of Fellowship was constructed in 1928. Twentieth century alterations include a large gable roofed east façade dormer and a rear addition. The Colonial Revival style two-story gable roofed rectory with attached one-car garage was constructed of stone and clapboard in 1941.
Date of AlterationsVarious years

SignificanceChrist Church at Pelham, built in 1843, was the earliest church structure in the Town of Pelham and the first example of the English parish style church in Westchester County. The Reverend Robert Bolton and his talented sons, Robert and John, built it on property he donated next to the Bolton Priory, the family residence constructed in 1838. Christ Church contains artistic works of national significance: "The Adoration of the Magi," considered the first figured stained glass window made in America, and the wood carved alter, communion rail, and corbels. The Boltons made a significant cultural contribution to the community, building a school for local children, running the Priory School, reputed to be the first girls’ boarding school in the nation and founding two other Episcopal churches in the town. The Boltons were an important part of Pelham for over 100 years.
DescriptionChrist Church is located near the northeast corner of a 4.06-acre site facing Pelhamdale Avenue. The original section is one bay wide, three bays deep, constructed of local fieldstone with a slate-covered gable roof. The windows are gothic-arched leaded stained glass with brick surrounds. The projecting entrance vestibule, now enclosed, has gothic-arched openings on three sides with brick surrounds. The main façade incorporates a tripartite gothic arched stained glass leaded window and a gable roofed bellcote with an 1843 Spanish bell. The Nanette Bolton Memorial Building was constructed to the east of the church in 1885; in 1910 the church was considerably enlarged, the nave turned from north/south to east/west, and the chancel extended to intersect with the Memorial Building. Connected to the Nanette Bolton Memorial Building wing, the Hall of Fellowship, similar in character to the original and later sections of the church, was constructed to the designs of Guy Mariner in 1928. Original 1843 interior of details of note, all executed by sons of Robert Bolton, include nine stained glass windows and the carved altar rail and furniture, communion table and rail, and illuminated five-panel reredos. Also on site are an 1844 fieldstone parish hall/school and a Colonial Revival style rectory.


PropertyPelhamdale
MunicipalityPelham
CommunityPelham Manor
Street Number45
Street AddressIden Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  11/04/82
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  09/27/82
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerDrs. Alfred Z. Spector and Rhonda Kost
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc.1755-60
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsAfter a fire (post 1900), the roof of the building was replaced; skylights since have been added.
Date of Alterations

SignificancePelhamdale, constructed about c.1755-60, is a significant example of an early New York State manor house. The building’s interior is exceptional for its intact classical details and formal arrangement, the elements of which mirror the vertical divisions of the front façade. Pelhamdale is also significant for its association with the Pell family, prominent settlers of Pelham Manor, and the property recalls an important episode in the development of the area.
DescriptionSituated on a triangular, three-quarter-acre lot in a twentieth-century residential neighborhood, Pelhamdale is a two-story residence of stone construction. The building is primarily faced in coursed, rock-faced stone ranging in color from muted orange and red to gray. White native sandstone lintels and sills appear around windows. A plain, wide entablature of brick articulates an attic story. The slightly hipped roof with four skylights is not visible from ground level. The building's plan is roughly rectangular and is distinguished by a formal arrangement on both the interior and exterior. Two, two-story bays flank the building's main (south side) entranceway. The balconied front porch features two fluted, white sandstone Doric columns. The window arrangement on the front façade is one of bilateral symmetry. The six, first story windows are nine-over-nine, double hung and span from floor to ceiling on the interior. The seven, second story windows are six-over-six, double hung. On the east side, two garages with a terrace on top span the ground level of the building. The north elevation is five ways wide and was the building’s main façade originally. Window placement on the building's west side is asymmetrical. To the rear of the house is a stone well with a shingled, conical roof. The interior of the building is characterized by exceptional arrangement and detailing. Rooms flank the centralized hallway on each floor. Interior features include fireplaces with marble and wood mantels, indoor recessed wooden shutters, wide molded chair rails and baseboards, and flooring of inlaid mahogany parquet and wide red pine board.


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