Chester Female Institute, Armonk

Photograph by Gray Williams

Historic Properties Listing

PropertyBeecher-McFadden Estate
MunicipalityPeekskill
Community
Street Number
Street AddressBeecher Way off East Main Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  11/02/87
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  09/28/87
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerCampus Associates
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsJacobethan Revival
Current UseMulti Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1875
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe home was extensively remodeled in the 1920s by the locally prominent McFadden family. The north (rear) elevation is all that remains of the original 1875 Beecher residence. The mansion’s interior plan and decoration dates from the 1920s remodeling. A large support building (carriage house) was built or extensively remodeled between 1902 and 1925. The building’s interior was altered for various uses during the mid-twentieth century after the McFadden Estate became part of the St. Peter’s Union Free School campus. At present, the entire estate is in private ownership and has been carefully converted into multi-family residential use.
Date of Alterations1920s; mid-20th century

SignificanceThe Beecher-McFadden Estate is historically and architecturally significant as a distinguished example of early twentieth century estate architecture in Peekskill that recalls an important episode on the city’s turn-of-the-century development. Built in 1875 and extensively altered in the 1920s, the Beecher-McFadden estate developed during a time when Peekskill and northern Westchester County was a popular location for the fashionable rural country estates of prominent and upper-income New York City families. Within the context of Peekskill, the Beecher-McFadden estate is the city’s most distinguished early twentieth-century upper-income residence. It exhibits all the hallmarks of the fashionable estates of this period including an imposing mansion designed in a popular early twentieth century architectural style, a large stylish support building, and a picturesque landscape that enhances the estate buildings and provides wide scenic views.
DescriptionThe Beecher-McFadden Estate is located on the eastern edge of the city of Peekskill in northern Westchester County. The four-acre estate is situated on a steep hillside off East Main Street and includes an imposing brick mansion and its large support building. The property has open lawns and a wide variety of shrubs and mature trees. The estate's mansion represents two building programs. Well-known American clergyman Henry Ward Beecher built a Victorian Gothic style country residence in 1875 that was extensively remodeled in the 1920s by the locally prominent McFadden family. This large, asymmetrical, Jacobethan Revival style mansion has a complex, multi-bay composition. Its two and one-half story south, east, and west elevations have brick sheathing that has been randomly punctuated with individual dressed stones. A wide brick terrace that has been partially enclosed with substantial brick porches wraps around the first floors of these same elevations. The porches have stone trim, Tudor arches, plain balustrades, and brick parapets with decorative stone plaques. A variety of multi-unit casement windows that have stone surrounds and leaded glass punctuate the south, east, and west elevations. The north (rear) elevation is all that remains of the original 1875 Beecher residence. It has one and one-half story red brick walls with polychrome brick trim. A one-story wooden bay window with clapboard base and leaded glass windows projects from the first floor. The broad, slate covered hipped roofs have a variety of wall dormers with gable roofs. The mansion’s interior plan and decoration dates from the 1920s remodeling. Wood paneling, wainscoting, handsome fireplaces, and molded surrounds enhance the main floor rooms. The second floor has a series of bedrooms with plaster walls and molded surrounds. For more information on the Beecher-McFadden House refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyDrum Hill School
MunicipalityPeekskill
Community
Street Number
Street AddressRinggold Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  12/31/79
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerDrum Hill Senior Living Community
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectEdward E. Joralemon
Builder
Building TypeEducation
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleNeo-Classic
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseMulti Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseEducation
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionFair
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1909-11
Structural SystemMetal
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsIn 1999 the structure was completely renovated as affordable independent housing for senior citizens.
Date of Alterations1999

SignificancePeekskill has a long history of exceptional pride and interest in its high quality educational institutions. Built in 1909-1911, the architecturally significant Drum Hill School was designed by Edward E. Joralemon and occupies a prominent site above the central business district. The largely unaltered classically-inspired school incorporated many innovative features being utilized in European schools at the time. A healthy environment was the aim and the fireproof building features an elaborate light court, E-shaped plan, complex heating system and gymnasium.
DescriptionDrum Hill School is located in Peekskill on a promontory 204 feet above the Hudson River. The school's front elevation is perpendicular to Ringgold Street. The building was designed by Edward E. Joralemon in 1909 and completed in 1911. It measures approximately 190 feet long, 130 feet wide, and 50 feet in height. The three-story E-shaped structure of gray-buff pressed brick is executed in the Neoclassical style and is symmetrical except for a small boiler wing in the northeastern corner. It is constructed of steel beams and girders, hollow terra cotta tile, and reinforced concrete girders, with a wood joist roof. Due to the sloping site, the rock-faced granite foundation is exposed on all sides except on the front façade. Above this is a cut stone sill on which rests the rusticated ground story of brick that is laid in a running bond and is punctuated with three, double-hung, sash windows within each bay. Inside, most of the contemporary furnishings and interior fittings have been removed, but the gray-green stained oak trim is intact. The classrooms are arranged around an interior atrium, which features a curving iron staircase to the second floor that separates into two flights of stairs midway up. For more details on the Drum Hill School refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyFord Administration Building
MunicipalityPeekskill
Community
Street Number
Street Address1031 Elm Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  03/03/06
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/08/06
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  03/03/06
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerPeekskill City School District
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectFrank A. Moore
Builder
Building TypeEducation
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGeorgian Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseEducation
Current Use, Details
Original UseEducation
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1925-26
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsRecent repair work to the building was part of an overall maintenance effort that did not alter any structural features. Many balcony details were covered over when it was closed in to allow for records storage. The gymnasium windows, originally identical to the auditorium windows, were replaced in the 1990s with frosted fixed glass panels over hopper windows.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Ford Administration Building is significant in the area of architecture as an intact, representative example of early 20th-century educational architecture in Westchester County. It is also significant in the area of education as the main building of the Peekskill Military Academy, an important institution in the city of Peekskill from its founding in 1833 to its closure in 1968. The building is the last significant structure remaining from the academy. In an academy brochure announcing its construction, a rendering of the proposed building was titled,"The Ford Administration and Recitation Building." It has also at various times been referred to as Ford Hall and Ford Auditorium, Today, supervision of the seven Peekskill school buildings and approximately 3,000 students takes place in this facility.
DescriptionThe Ford Administration Building is a two-story Colonial Revival building that occupies the southwest corner of Wells and Elm streets in the Oak Hill neighborhood of Peekskill. It faces an open field across Elm Street that was the parade grounds for the former Peekskill Military Academy. The additional surrounding grounds were also used for the Academy, which closed in 1968. The building is constructed in the shape of an "I." The bottom section houses the administrative offices; the top section is the gym; and the middle section adjoining them is the auditorium. The building has a symmetrical front façade, with side wings and features a central portico with four Doric columns and a denticulated pedimented roof. It is constructed of red brick in a pattern of one row Flemish bond to three rows of running bond. The front façade fenestration evidences the Colonial Revival style with six-over-six wood sash double-hung windows. The hipped roof retains its original distinctive slate shingles and wood box gutters. Centered on the roof above the portico is a cupola. Original interior features include a marble wall (in the entrance lobby); crown molding; plaster walls; and walnut doors and paneled wainscoting. For more details on the Ford Administration Building refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyFort-Hill Nelson Ave - Historic District
MunicipalityPeekskill
Community
Street Number
Street Address

Historic District NameFort-Hill Nelson Ave - Historic District
Local Landmark Status?Yes  03/15/06
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status? Yes  06/09/06
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  03/15/06
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building Type
Building Type, Details
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current Use
Current Use, Details
Original Use
Original Use, Details
Structural Condition
Neighborhood
Threats to Building
Site Integrity
Date Moved
Year Built
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

Significance
Description


PropertyMount Florence
MunicipalityPeekskill
Community
Street Number
Street AddressMaple Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  12/30/87
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  12/30/87
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerMount Florence Group
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectFrank J. Murphy (chapel)
Builder
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsDomestic, Health Care
Architectural StyleItalianate (Craig mansion)
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseMulti Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsDomestic, Health Care
Structural ConditionFair
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to BuildingAll but 2 of the buildings were demolished and replaced with condominiums.
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1874-1938
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsAll but two of the structures were demolished and replaced with condominium units. The chapel was made into a recreation center for the condominium owners. The 1897 East Building was altered into 28 loft-style apartments. The buildings underwent extensive alterations. The chapel’s German-made stained glass windows were removed and donated to the Peekskill Museum.
Date of Alterationsc. 2000

SignificanceMount Florence is historically significant for its association with progressive institutional childcare in New York State in the period 1880 - 1938. It was established in 1874 by the Sisters of the Good Shepherd, Province of New York, a Catholic order that had been providing aid to women in New York City since 1857. Mount Florence also served as a motherhouse and teaching facility for novitiates and sisters and, this, influenced the growing sophistication of childcare elsewhere in the order. Architecturally, Mount Florence illustrates the functioning of a self-sufficient, turn-of-the-century religious social service institution and its various component parts, including: chapel; convent; dormitories; farm with fields, orchards, and pastures; gardens, both productive and ornamental; lawns; recreational space, both active and passive; and cemetery. The complex has been demolished and all that remains is the 1897 East Building and the 1927 Chapel. For more information, refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.
DescriptionMount Florence was a large 125-acre institutional complex located in Peekskill developed between 1874 and 1938 by the Sisters of the Good Shepherd, Province of New York for the care and treatment of orphaned and delinquent girls. The New York State Register listing was composed of nine contributing buildings and structures including the Craig mansion house, the West building, the East building, the Chapel, the boiler house and laundry, the Long Building, the Caretaker’s residence, the cemetery, and the landscape. There were also 24 non-contributing buildings on the site. The Craig mansion house was a two-story Italianate style residence that was originally constructed for Daniel H. Craig c. 1865. The building was square on plan and of wooden frame construction sheathed with clapboard siding that was covered with asbestos shingles in the late 1940s. The Ginsburg Development Corporation demolished the Craig mansion, along with several of the other structures, in 2000. All that remains today is the 1897 school building (the West Building) and the adjacent 1927 chapel. Both have undergone extensive alterations. For more information on Mount Florence refer to the file maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society. For details on the demolition of the site refer to the book, Hudson Valley Ruins: Forgotten Landmarks of an American Landscape by Thomas E. Rinaldi and Robert J. Yasinsac.


PropertyPeekskill Downtown Historic District
MunicipalityPeekskill
Community
Street Number
Street AddressMain, Division, South, Park, Bank, Brown, First and Esther Streets; Central and Union Avenues

Historic District NamePeekskill Downtown Historic District
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/09/04
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status? Yes  07/28/05
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  01/09/04
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerVarious Owners
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeMixed Use
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGreek Revival, Italianate, Second Empire, Moderne
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseMixed Use
Current Use, Details
Original UseMixed Use
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodCommercial
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year BuiltVarious years
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Peekskill Downtown Historic District is historically and architecturally significant as representing the distinctive characteristics of the development of a commercial downtown in Peekskill during the last half of the nineteenth century and its culmination in the first half of the twentieth century. Following the Civil War local prosperity had spurred sufficient commercial demand that industries were pushed farther east into the gorge and along the Hudson River. New stylish brick commercial properties appeared, concentrated along three principal thoroughfares: the post road (South and North Division Streets), the road to the landing (Main Street), and the road to Danbury, Connecticut (South Division Street). The irregular street plan, complex intersections, and dense streetscapes combine to create a visually distinctive urban environment, and the historic district retains the compact scale of a nineteenth-century downtown now rare in the Hudson Valley. The historic district contains a remarkable number of public and commercial buildings built in the 1920s and 1930s. Of particular interest is the development on Bank Street, which was created in 1935 between Main and Park Streets across the last foundry site in the downtown. Distinctive examples of Moderne architecture were constructed there that inspired a boom in redevelopment of many older buildings. Peekskill’s unique location and history coupled with a strong and diverse collection of intact historic buildings creates a distinctive historic district. For more details on the Peekskill Downtown Historic District’s significance refer to the National Register of Historic Places file at the Westchester County Historical Society.
DescriptionThe Peekskill Downtown Historic District is located in the center of Peekskill in northern Westchester County. The district is situated at the intersection of two historic routes through the city: the Albany Post Road and the Danbury Road. Two other important roads were linked to this intersection, a road heading west to Peekskill's Historic Landing and a road heading northeast into Putnam County. These routes combined to create Main Street and later, U.S. Route 6. The district contains approximately 160 commercial, governmental, recreational, cultural, religious, and residential structures located along Main, Division, South, Park, Bank, Brown, First and Esther Streets and Central and Union Avenues that contribute to its historic significance. The architectural styles represented by these buildings include Greek Revival, Italianate, Second Empire and Modern. In spite of having lost significant portions of its context due to the city’s Urban Renewal Program during the 1960s and 1970s the suburban relocation of many of its traditional functions and commercial economy, the district remains a rare surviving element of nineteenth-century urban, commercial development in the Hudson Valley. For details on the contributing structures within the Peekskill Downtown Historic District refer to the National Register of Historic Places files at the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyPeekskill Freight Depot
MunicipalityPeekskill
Community
Street Number41
Street AddressSouth Water Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  09/13/04
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  11/24/04
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  09/13/04
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerPrivate
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsTransportation
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsLate Victorian: Stick/Eastlake
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsUnder restoration
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsTransportation: train depot
Structural ConditionFair
NeighborhoodCommercial
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1890
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe primary alteration to the exterior of the freight house is the recent (c. 1980) enclosure of most of the exterior platforms with wood stubs and asbestos siding to provide additional storage space for a commercial owner; however, it appears little or no original fabric on the exterior was modified during the installation of the enclosure. The Lincoln Society in Peekskill and the City of Peekskill are now working to restore the train depot to it's past glory along with the creation of a Lincoln Museum at the site.
Date of AlterationsRecent: 1980 and today

SignificanceThe Peekskill Freight Depot, affectionately known as the "Lincoln Depot," is significant in the area of architecture as a representative example of late nineteenth century railroad architecture in Westchester County. It is also significant in the area of transportation for its association with the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad, which was highly important to the development and prosperity of the City of Peekskill. Built c. 1890 by the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad to replace an earlier and smaller frame freight and passenger station (where Abraham Lincoln spoke on the way to his inauguration in 1861), the depot was one of a number of buildings in Peekskill that served the railroad and the businesses of the city. Although somewhat altered from its original appearance, the depot retains sufficient integrity to convey its significance. Although there are a number of passenger and combination passenger-freight stations left on the Hudson River line, the Peekskill Freight Depot is one of the few surviving buildings on the line built solely as a utilitarian freight house.
DescriptionThe Peekskill Freight Depot, built c. 1890, is located on the southwestern end of Central Avenue, west of the city’s central business district and near the secondary commercial area known as "lower Main Street." It is adjacent to the tracks of Amtrak and Metro-North Railroad, near the city’s waterfront. Although once in the center of a complex of factories and railroad related buildings, it is now somewhat isolated, accessed at the rear of a plumbing supply building. The freight depot is a one-story masonry building of common bond brick and roofed with a shallow pitched gable roof. The building measures approximately 96’ x 30’ and, although somewhat altered, retains most of the significant elements from its historic past. The roofline of the building extends about 8’ beyond the plane of the building on all four sides, providing shelter for the loading and unloading of freight. The overhanging roof is supported by a characteristic series of large wood brackets. On the north and south ends the gable ends are decorative wood verge boards and central concave panels supporting a triangular form at the peak of the roof. Although now largely obscured by the enclosure, the fenestration on the building is segmental-arched, and includes both windows and large service doors, some of which retain their original sliding door systems. The bay spacing is defined by a series of brick pilasters between the windows and doors. The interior of the freight house is now cement-floored, but retains original trim and defining features including wainscoting, an open truss work ceiling, and window and door trim including reed molding and bull’s-eye corner blocks.


PropertyPeekskill Museum (Herrick House)
MunicipalityPeekskill
Community
Street Number124
Street AddressUnion Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  10/20/89
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerThe Peekskill Museum
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectWilliam Rutherford Mead
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleQueen Anne
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsMuseum
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1877
Structural SystemWood Frame, Light Members
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsThe wrap around veranda porch was removed from the south side c. 1950; the rear second story addition was added on the west side c. 1950 and removed in 1988.
Date of Alterationsc. 1950; 1988

SignificanceThe Herrick House represents an early example of the Queen Anne "Shingle Style" architecture. It was designed by William Rutherford Mead of the architectural firm of McKim, Mead, and Bigelow (Shortly McKim, Mead, and White), as a residence for local attorney Dwight Stiles Herrick.
DescriptionThe Herrick House is located 500 feet from Peekskill’s downtown commercial district directly across the street from the Assumption Church and School. The surroundings consist of a high density of multiple family units and a number of single-family units consisting of a high portion of Victorian era architecture. The house contains numerous architectural details that include shingle exterior treatment on the upper level of the building, clapboard on the lower half, a brick veneer foundation, detailed wood carvings/details in the arches and over porches. The Herrick House has eight fireplaces, nine rooms, including a library, in addition to ample storage rooms. Roof construction entails slate with yankee gutters. Diagonal woodwork was used to detail above and below bay windows. The Herrick House has incorporated into its construction a number of bays, a dormer, and portico. The roof is of the gable design. Interior woodwork includes pocket doors, built-in closets adjacent to interior windows, an atrium staircase, and oak moldings. Detailed floor wood treatments command the first floor area.


PropertyPeekskill Post Office
MunicipalityPeekskill
Community
Street Number738
Street AddressSouth Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  05/11/89
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/11/89
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  05/11/89
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerUnited States Postal Service, Northeast Region
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectJames A. Wetmore
Builder
Building TypeGovernment
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleColonial Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseGovernment
Current Use, Details
Original UseGovernment
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1930-31
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe west façade of the building originally had tripartite windows on the first story but the northernmost two were removed in 1967 when the new mailing platform was added. A rear wing was also constructed in 1967.
Date of Alterations1967

SignificanceThe Peekskill Post Office is architecturally significant as a distinguished example of an early twentieth century Colonial Revival style public building in New York State. This small-scale post office was designed in 1930 and was completed in 1931 during the tenure of James A. Wetmore as Acting Supervising Architect of the Treasury Department. It was erected under the provisions of the 1930 amendment to the Public Buildings Act of 1926, which was one of the first federal responses to the economic crisis resulting from the Depression. The Peekskill Post Office exhibits features typical of its period and style, including a symmetrical composition, red brick construction and multi-paned sash; however, the decorative features of the building are particularly handsome, being specifically derived from Georgian period architecture. Although the design of the Peekskill Post Office was not specifically replicated in other New York State communities, it may have been the prototype for several later post offices.
DescriptionThe Peekskill Post Office is located at 738 South Street at the northwest corner of Depew Street in the city of Peekskill, New York. It is in a mixed-use area near commercial and residential structures. The post office is one story in height, rectangular in plan and the facades are clad in red brick laid in English bond. Limestone and wood are used in its ornamentation. Decorative wrought-iron fences surround window wells that provide light to the basement. The principal façade is symmetrically composed around a three-bay central pavilion containing three full-height semicircular arched openings. The center arch contains an entrance reached by stone steps that are flanked by cast-iron lampposts. There are two modern entrance doors with a single-light transom. Raised metal lettering reading "UNITED STATES POST OFFICE" is mounted on the façade above the arches. In the interior, a rectangular public lobby extends across the central three bays of the principal façade. It has a high ceiling with a deep plaster cornice and modern lighting. Veined white marble wainscoting surrounds the room. For more details on the Peekskill Post Office refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyPeekskill Presbyterian Church
MunicipalityPeekskill
Community
Street Number705
Street AddressSouth Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  11/12/02
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  11/12/02
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerPeekskill Presbyterian Church
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGreek Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1846
Structural SystemWood Frame
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsAdditions to the original church provide room for the organ/choir loft, church study, Sunday school, social hall and Christian Education building. The late 19th century addition at the rear of the church is one-and-one half story in height and extends well beyond both side elevations of the church. The 1964 addition to the west side of the rear addition is two stories in height and was designed to be compatible with the architecture of the church. The interior was remodeled in 1892 and 1922.
Date of Alterations1892; 1922; 1964

SignificanceThe Peekskill Presbyterian Church is an outstanding example of Greek Revival ecclesiastical architecture in Westchester County. Built in 1846 by a skilled building or architect-builder, whose name has yet to be determined, the church exhibits the hallmarks of the Greek Revival style, including heavy Doric corner pilasters, deep entablature, pedimented gable roof, and exuberant tower embellished with Doric pilasters and Corinthian columns.
DescriptionThe Peekskill Presbyterian Church, an imposing Greek Revival frame church built c. 1846, is located at the corner of South and Washington Streets approximately one-half mile from the Hudson River. It is in a mixed-use area and is within Peekskill's first locally designated historic district. A four-foot high stone retaining wall defines the north and west boundaries of the rectangular-shaped property. The church is a one-story, three-bay wide and four-bay deep, white painted clapboard building set on a stone foundation. A full entablature and four corner Doric pilasters support a pedimented gable roof. A four-staged centrally placed tower is engaged halfway into the main façade of the building and contains the entrance door to the church. The four large windows along each side of the sanctuary have double hung wood sash of thirty-six over thirty-six clear-glass panes. Single windows of the same size flank the tower on the main façade. The sanctuary is rectangular, with a high flat ceiling and original wainscoting up to the bottom of the windows. The windows retain their original eared surrounds and louvered interior shutters, but most of the features of sanctuary date from the 1892 and 1922 remodelings. For more details on the Peekskill Presbyterian Church refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertySt. Peter's Episcopal Church
MunicipalityPeekskill
Community
Street Number137
Street AddressNorth Division Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  11/29/02
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  07/22/03
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  11/29/02
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectRichard M. Upjohn Jr.
Builder
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1890-1
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe church buildings have undergone a number of additions and alterations, including the 1905 addition of the tower and lych gate, the 1934 remodeling of the church interior, and the 1964 addition to the church hall at the south gable end. Also, in 1926 the interior chancel was remodeled.
Date of AlterationsVarious years

SignificanceSt. Peter's Episcopal Church is significant as a fine regional example of the late Gothic Revival style in Westchester County. The granite church, designed by Richard M. Upjohn Jr. and completed in 1891, displays many of the characteristics of the English Gothic style popular at the end of the nineteenth century. Its stone construction, gothic arches, the offset tower, and exposed truss interior typify the style. The attached stone lych gate, stone tower, and stucco parish hall as well as the brick parish office building all contribute to the site. The congregation has been committed to the preservation of the property, and the complex retains a high degree of historic integrity to its period of significance.
DescriptionSt. Peter's Episcopal Church is a late-nineteenth century Neo-Gothic Revival style church that is located at the southeast corner of North Division and Howard Streets, one block north of Main Street in the city of Peekskill, New York. The church property consists of about one-half acre and surrounded by mixed residential and commercial properties and a park. The present church, built in 1891, is the second church building to use the site, having replaced an earlier wooden Gothic structure (1838). The nave is a linear one-story rectangular structure built with coursed rock-faced granite. The gable-roofed church is capped by slates and is terminated at the front gable end by a raised parapet wall with a stone coping. On the two sides, the eaves extend over aisles with shed-roofed extensions that run the full length of the nave. The lych gate and the bell tower are each connected to the church by a short enclosed breezeway. Each is built with the same rough-faced granite as the church. The crenellated bell tower, added in 1905 is sixteen feet square and 60 feet high. The interior of the church contains wood pews, wood trusses, wainscoting, and a vaulted ceiling chancel. There are twelve stained glass windows surrounding the chancel and nave. Also on site are the Howard House (the former parsonage) and the Frost Memorial Parish House. For more details on St. Peter's Episcopal Church refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyStandard House
MunicipalityPeekskill
Community
Street Number50
Street AddressHudson Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  04/05/00
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  11/24/00
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  04/05/00
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerKatharina and Richard Cerreta
Institutional OwnerFifty Hudson Avenue Realty Corp.
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeCommercial
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleItalianate
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseCommercial
Current Use, Details
Original UseCommercial
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodCommercial
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1855
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe exterior masonry was carefully washed and repointed with matching mortar. The original chimneys and shutters that had been removed were rebuilt and replaced. And, all of the wood windows were rebuilt rather than replaced. (Information from http://www.preservenys.org/programs/awards01.htm)
Date of Alterationsc. 2000

SignificanceThe Standard House in the city of Peekskill is a three-story Italianate style brick commercial building with four-bay symmetrical front and rear elevations and first-story storefronts on both elevations. Built c. 1855 as a multi-purpose commercial building with residential upper floors, the building is architecturally significant as a distinctive example of mid-19th century commercial architecture in the city of Peekskill. It exhibits the characteristic features of the Italianate style, including its square shape, round-arched corbelled brick window lintels, a bracketed cornice, a hip roof, and a prominent cupola. On the interior are the former saloon/ restaurant/ commercial spaces and a simple wood staircase leading to the residential upper floors, which have simple woodwork and plaster walls and ceilings. The location of the Standard House, adjacent to the New York Central Railroad (Amtrak) and the Hudson River and its architectural style gives it a prominent place in Peekskil's past, present, and future.
DescriptionThe Standard House is located at the base of Hudson Avenue and is adjacent to Peekskill’s Riverfront Green Park, which is situated along the Hudson River. Built c. 1855, the Standard House is a three-story rectangular painted brick commercial building in the Italianate style with a shallow pitched pyramidal roof and centrally located square cupola. The basement foundation walls were constructed of stone and brick. The building is four ways wide by three bays deep. On the first story of the north and south elevations are original storefronts, both of which have been modified over the many years of commercial use. The building is in fair to good condition with minor alterations on the exterior. On the interior, the first floor was mostly gutted several years ago, although the residential upper floors retain their floor plans, staircases, and some woodwork and plaster surfaces. For more details on the Standard House in Peekskill refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyThomas Nelson House
MunicipalityPeekskill
Community
Street Number1231
Street AddressSeymour Lane

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  06/15/01
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  08/20/01
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/15/01
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerKaren Burghart
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleItalianate
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1860
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsA one-car garage was added in 1950. A small porch was added to the back of the house after 1950. Storm windows were installed sometime in the 1950s and the floorboards on the main porch were replaced. The exterior paint has also been changed over time. The interior in the main part of the house has seen little change except for paper and paint. The kitchen was modernized in the 1950s.
Date of Alterations1950s

SignificanceThe Thomas Nelson House is significant in the area of architecture as a distinctive, intact example of Italianate style residential architecture in Westchester County. Built c. 1860 for Thomas Nelson, a New York City attorney and politician, it exhibits the hallmark features of its style, with its square shape, large windows with decorative surrounds and two-over-two sash, oriel windows, bracketed cornice, hip roof, and a prominent open front porch with paired supports and bracketed eaves. On the interior are the original marble mantels, decorative plasterwork, and an unusual freestanding staircase with walnut newels, balusters, and railings. The house retains a high degree of integrity on the exterior and interior.
DescriptionThe Thomas Nelson House, an Italianate frame residence built c. 1860, is situated in a residential neighborhood comprised of single-family homes and sits on a 1.67-acre site with mature landscaping. It is two stories in height with a slightly hipped roof. The building's footprint is approximately 41 feet wide by 52 feet deep; excluding the one-car garage added in 1950. The exterior of the building is clapboard. The foundation is a combination of stone and brick. Cement steps lead into the northeast corner of the basement from the east yard. The one-story open front porch extends across the three-bay main façade and around to the first bay of the west elevations. The roof has a projecting wooden box cornice support by large evenly spaced metal and wood brackets with wood dentils between them. It is clad in asphalt roofing. The large shallow gutters are lined with copper. The large brick chimney is covered with fiberglass chimney wrap. The first floor of the interior of the house is comprised of a center hall with a walnut freestanding staircase, a dining room, library, kitchen, bathroom, and a living room. There are five bedrooms and two full baths on the second floor. All rooms in the main part of the house have plaster walls and ceilings, wainscoting, wood baseboards, intact door surrounds/moldings, and solid four panel doors. Both the exterior and interior of the Nelson House maintain a high level of integrity. The one outbuilding on the property, the well house, is in its original location. The building is wood clapboard on a poured concrete foundation with asphalt shingles. For more information on the Nelson House refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyVilla Loretto
MunicipalityPeekskill
Community
Street Number
Street AddressCrompond Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  12/30/87
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  06/02/89
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  12/30/87
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerWood Brooke Loretto Associates
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectFrank J. Murphy
Builder
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsInstitutional
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseMulti Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsInstitutional
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1928
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsVilla Loretto has undergone extensive renovations. The structure now serves as a condominium complex.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceVilla Loretto is historically significant for its association with progressive institutional childcare in New York State, one of the major areas of social reform in the period 1880-1930. The treatment program developed by the Sisters of the Good Shepherd -- first at their New York City mission and later at their rural retreat in Peekskill -- was focused on socially maladjusted female adolescents. The Villa Loretto program was the first in the nation to provide government-supported training to delinquent females in the 16 to 21 years old age group. Designed by Frank J. Murphy in 1928, the structure was inspired by Renaissance models and contains classic proportions and decoration. Yet it also maintains a visual association with the American Colonial Revival taste of the period.
DescriptionVilla Loretto is a large institutional building erected in 1928 by the Sisters of the Good Shepherd in Peekskill. Situated on a hilltop parcel at the northern extremity of the Mount Florence property, the views from the building include the Hudson Highlands and the Peekskill Bay. The massive three-story brick building extends more than 500 feet from east to west following an H-plan with service wing configuration. Nearly four stories tall, including a high basement, Villa Loretto contains more than 175,000 square feet. In design, the building follows a classical architectural pattern. Principles of symmetry, balance, order, horizontality, and trinity are emphasized throughout. The building is constructed with load bearing brick masonry walls finished in a common bond pattern. A steel skeletal frame supports the internal wood frame floor, wall, and roof structure. The roofs of the main, H-plan sections are hipped and covered with asbestos shingles; the service wing has a copper gabled roof with dormers. Windows generally consist of double-hung wood sash units in a twelve-over-two configuration. The 112-room interior of Villa Loretto was functional in plan, reflecting the nature of the rehabilitative treatment plan of the Sisters of the Good Shepherd. Room organization located fixed activity spares along a linear system of double-loaded hallways in the building. The structure has been converted to condominiums and is now surrounded by townhouses. For more information on the building refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


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