Mead Homestead, Waccabuc

Photograph by Gray Williams

Historic Properties Listing

PropertyAll Saints Episcopal Church
MunicipalityOssining
CommunityBriarcliff Manor
Street Number201
Street AddressScarborough Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  03/21/02
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/14/02
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  03/21/02
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectRichard Upjohn; Wiilliam H. Deacy
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1848-1854
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe original English Gothic Revival church consisted of a rectangular nave with high pitched gable roof. In 1911 a transept and enlarged chancel in the same style were added. The present bell tower of nonferrous metal replaced, in 1964, the 1911 wooden befrey. Memorial stained glass windows replaced, at an uncertain date, the original diamond paned windows. The flat 1911 sacristy roof was later converted to a pitched shed dormer to house the pipes of an organ. A parish hall, c. 1950, 1954, of concrete block is linked to the church by a flat -roofed glass and concrete connector. Circa 1902, a cellar was dug under the sacristy and a forced air furnace installed.
Date of Alterations1911, 1964, 1902

SignificanceAll Saints Episcopal Church is an important example of the work of Richard Upjohn one of America's preeminant ecclesiastical architects and an early and outstanding speciman of his English inspired rural Gothic Revival style. The church's vestibule window is attributed to the Gibson manufactury of Philadelphia and along with its diamond paned cathedral glass windows (also, possibly by Gibson) constitutes a rare survival of mid-nineteenth century windows in their original setting. Moreover, additions in 1911 and 1950, 1954 have enhanced rather than obscured the original design.
DescriptionAll Saints Episcopal Church, completed in 1854, fronts on Scarborough Road in Briarcliff Manor, western Westchester County. Initial construction was inspired and funded by the Rev. John Ogilby who had been much taken with an English Gothic country church at Bemerton near Salisbury, and who employed the rising ecclesiastical architect, Richard Upjohn (fresh from completion of Manhattan's Trinity Church) to realize his dream. Designed in what came to be recognized as Upjohn's "rural" style as opposed to his grander city churches, All Saints initially consisted of a rectangular nave with pitched gabel roof covered by slate shingles. The walls were of granite ashlar and the foundations of rubble stone. Entrance was through a porch on the south façade. The building occupies a portion of a 1.94 acre lot donated by Ogilby. There were no significant exterior changes until 1911 when the architect William H. Deacy was employed to create a cruciform church by adding to the rectangular nave a chancel and transepts. There were no further alterations until 1950, 1954 when Deacey was again called upon to add a parish hall to house the Sunday School and offices. In 1964 a new belfrey was added. Some of the original windows have been replaced, but more remain than is customary with churches of this age. Entrance to the church is through lancet shaped wooden batten doors, and the interior walls are rough plastered and the pews are of oak. Six matching chandeliers light the interior. The space is dominated by a large organ, a 1968 replacement of the original pipe organ. Two important buildings associated with the church are located on an after acquired two acre property about a quarter mile east on Scarborough Road. These are a Rectory and old Parish Hall. The first, built in 1883, is in the Victorian Stick Style with rubble stone first story walls and a half-timbered second story. It has a high pitched gabel roof, overhanging eves and exposed rafters. The original Parish Hall is remarkable more for its history than its architecture. Designed in the Arts and Crafts style and completed in 1904, it was constructed almost entirely by parish women, an almost unheard of thing at the time. The hall has walls of undressed fieldstones, a split entrance door in the Dutch manner and a fieldstone fireplace. Though somewhat removed from the church proper, these two buildings both add to the surviving religious complex and show an interesting progression in architectural styles.


PropertyBrandreth Pill Factory
MunicipalityOssining
CommunityOssining
Street Number
Street AddressWater Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  01/10/80
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerFilex Steel Products, Inc. and Alcolac Chemical c/o Sundermann Real Estate
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectCalvin Pollard
Builder
Building TypeIndustrial
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleItalianate, Greek Revival, Second Empire
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseIndustrial
Current Use, Details
Original UseIndustrial
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionDeteriorated
NeighborhoodIndustrial
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1836
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, DetailsWith heavy wood framing
Photograph Available?Yes
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Brandreth Pill Factory, pre-dating the 1848 construction of the New York Central and Hudson Railroad, was a major contributing factor to the nineteenth century industrial development of Ossining and one of the earliest manufacturing complexes in Westchester County. Together the buildings present an interesting cross-section of regional architectural styles applied to industrial use. The possibility exists that the earliest surviving building on the site, a well proportioned brick storage building detailed in the Greek Revival idiom, is the work of New York City architect Calvin Pollard. The factory site is closely associated with the personal history of Dr. Benjamin Brandreth, an important figure in the development of patent medicines, American advertising, and the Village of Ossining.
DescriptionThe Brandreth Pill Factory (1836) is located on a site of approximately five and a half acres in the Village of Ossining. The Hudson River lies to the west of the property. Largest of the structures in the complex, the main building is in the Italianate Revival style, with a French Second Empire mansard roof. It is constructed of red brick with wood trim, roofed with slate, and has four chimneys. The round-arched fenestration of the main façade consists of, at the first level, six windows and three double doors, all with brick hood lintels; at the second level, thirteen windows, also with hood lintels; and ten dormers at the roof level. Brackets with pendants support the cast-iron cornice. Interior features of note include exposed brick walls; segmentally arched interior openings; two kids of support columns, some of cast iron and others of solid walnut; and exposed roof framing at the third level. For more information on the main factory building and additional buildings on the site refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyCarrie Chapman Catt House
MunicipalityOssining
CommunityBriarcliff Manor
Street Number20
Street AddressRyder Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  04/24/06
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/18/06
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  04/24/06
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsArts and Crafts
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodWooded
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1910
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe west elevation has a two-story addition in the central part of the building that was added during the Catt occupancy.
Date of Alterations1920s

SignificanceThe Carrie Chapman Catt House, known as Juniper Ledge, is significant as the home of the famous suffragist between 1919 and 1928, during the time when she played a pivotal role in securing the Nineteenth Amendment giving women the right to vote (1920). It is also significant as a fine example of Arts and Crafts style architecture in Westchester County. Carrie Chapman Catt (1859-1947), who graduated from Iowa State College in 1880, became active in the suffrage movement in the late 1880s, succeeding Susan B. Anthony as president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association in 1900 and later president of the International Woman Suffrage Alliance. In 1919, after being twice widowed and at the height of her influence on the on the suffrage movement, she bought a house on Ryder Road near the Village of Briarcliff Manor and resided there until 1928. During that time, besides the passage of the 19th Amendment, Catt helped organize the League of Women Voters, published a book about the suffrage movement, and founded the National Committee on the Cause and Cure of War.
DescriptionJuniper Ledge, the residence of Carrie Chapman Catt from 1919 and 1928, is located in the town of New Castle, just north of the Ossining town line (it has a Briarcliff Manor address). The house is located on a four-acre heavily wooded property that has a series of ledges leading steeply down toward the Saw Mill River Road. The house was built c. 1910 and is highly intact on the interior and exterior from its date of construction. The house is roughly T-shaped and two-and-one-half stories in height, with a high-pitched gable roof and clipped gable ends. Asymmetrical in form, the house has a random-coursed fieldstone first story and wood shingle clad upper stories. The main façade had a two-story projecting bay of stone, with a gable roof perpendicular to the main roof. On the second story is a large round-arched multi-light sash window that lights the interior staircase. On the south elevation is a full-width one-story porch supported by heavy stone piers. On the interior, the main rooms have simple Classically inspired motifs, such as the pilastered mantelpiece in the dining room and staircase with Doric newelpost. The main entrance door leads into a small hallway, from which a door leads into the service winds, double doors lead into the main living room, a door leads into a study, and the open staircase leads up to the second floor. On the second floor of the main house are four bedrooms and two bathrooms. The attic is partially finished off, while the basement is unfinished. For more information refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyDowntown Ossining Historic District
MunicipalityOssining
CommunityOssining
Street Number
Street AddressHighland Avenue (Route 9); Main Street; Croton Avenue

Historic District NameDowntown Ossining Historic District
Local Landmark Status?Yes  08/25/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status? Yes  08/09/89
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  08/25/88
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerVarious Owners
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectRobert W. Gibson, Isaac Gale Perry
Builder
Building TypeCommercial, religious, single dwelling, government
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleItalianate, Renaissance, Gothic Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseCommercial, religious, single dwelling, government
Current Use, Details
Original UseCommercial, religious, single dwelling, government
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodCommercial
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1840-1933
Structural SystemVarious
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Downtown Ossining Historic District is architecturally significant as a largely intact collection of civic, religious, and commercial buildings that have survived as the functional center of a historic Westchester County Hudson River collage. Together they reflect the establishment of Ossining's village center at the intersection of three historic thoroughfares. This civic, religious, and commercial core is historically significant for its direct association with the growth of the larger community during Ossining's period of greatest prosperity, the second half of the nineteenth century and the first decades of the twentieth century. The significant buildings of the district, many of monumental character designed in high style, reflect the optimism and rapid growth of this period. The thirty-seven contributing resources range in date of construction from circa 1840 to 1933 and exemplify a number of popular architectural styles from that time. Despite the existence of altered buildings and modern infill, the Downtown Ossining Historic District retains its original scale, spatial organization, and architectural character. The district is one of the few remaining intact illustrations of the physical and social development of a Westchester County village center.
DescriptionThe Downtown Ossining Historic District is located at the center of the incorporated village of Ossining, New York. The district includes thirty-seven contributing properties. This list includes twenty-seven commercial buildings, four church properties, municipal building, post office, high school, one residence, and a portion of the Croton Aqueduct. The district comprises the late nineteenth- early twentieth century civic, religious, and commercial core at the intersection of Highland Avenue (Route 9) and Main Street. Primarily linear in plan, the configuration of the district is that of an upside-down Y with the base at the north end formed by the upper portions of Highland Avenue and Main Street. The arms of the Y include the concentration of commercial buildings along the north side of Main Street, and properties living both sides of Highland Avenue south to Emwilton Place. The Downtown Ossining Historic District is clearly differentiated from adjacent sections of the village by use, scale, and architectural distinction. The district’s chronological limits, 1840 to 1933, incorporate illustrations of a variety of popular mid-to-late nineteenth century and turn-of-the-century architectural modes. These include Greek Revival, Italianate, High Victorian Gothic, Neo-Gothic Revival, Renaissance Revival, Beaux Arts, Collegiate Gothic, Art Deco, and the Neo-Renaissance and Neoclassical styles. For details on the properties within the Downtown Ossining Historic District refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyFirst Baptist Church of Ossining
MunicipalityOssining
CommunityOssining
Street Number
Street AddressSouth Highland and Main Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  01/12/73
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerCongregation of the First Baptist Church
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectJ. Walsh
BuilderJohn Hoff
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodCommercial
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1874
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsSchool rooms were added in the undercraft of the building.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe First Baptist Church of Ossining is significant for its architectural, social, and religious impact on village life. It serves as a well-preserved example of the use of Gothic elements in later 19th century American church architecture. In Ossining there exists no other structure that represents so authentically this style of architecture. The location of the church increases the role of its visual importance. Since the founder and the church and the town were the same man, Elijah Hunter, it is not surprising that the church stands on the very central part of the village triangle, making it visible as one approaches the town from several directions.
DescriptionLocated in a triangular section of the central part of the village of Ossining is the First Baptist Church. The brick structure with Gothic elements was dedicated in 1874 and is surrounded by a cast iron fence. The T-shaped structure consists of two sections; a main rectangular block houses the sanctuary while a smaller rectangle on the north side, perpendicular to the main section, houses support facilities. A gable roof of gray slate covers each of the sections. Four gabled dormers with small quatrefoil windows are located on the east and west sides of the sanctuary. Directly under each dormer is a large Gothic arch window with tracery. There is a large Gothic arch stained glass window on the front façade. On the southwest corner is a square steeple, the lower part of which is brick with limestone decoration. The top portion of the tower has a wooden truss frame that is covered with galvanized sheet iron that has been painted. Lancet windows can be found in both sections of the tower. The central spire has smaller spires at each corner. Lancet arch doorways and highly carved Gothic doors with original brass hardware are found at the entrance. The all-wooden interior of the church consists of wooden columns, exposed ornaments and hammer beam wooden trusses. Various quatrefoils and sexfoils form elaborate ornamentation between the exposed trusses. The columns and trusses form the structural system of the building. At the north end is an altar raised about five feet above the ground, containing a large white marble baptistery. Above the altar is a platform housing a wooden organ. In the rear end of the sanctuary is a small balcony.


PropertyJug Tavern
MunicipalityOssining
CommunityOssining
Street Number
Street AddressRevolutionary Road @ Rockledge Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  06/07/76
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerJug Tavern of Sparta, Inc.
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling/ Commercial
Building Type, Details
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsMuseum
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling/ Commercial
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc.1760
Structural SystemOther (describe)
Structural System, DetailsMortise and tenon
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsThe Jug Tavern has undergone many alterations. The southern portion of the building was added at a later date from the original construction, and the roofline of this portion appears to have been raised to that of the original structure. The original fireplaces, which obviously stood at either end of the house, were demolished, and the old well in front of the house has been filled in. The center brick flue is modern.
Date of Alterations1884; 1975 - 1991

SignificanceThe Jug Tavern, first built by the Davis family in the third quarter of the eighteenth century as a modest farmhouse on the Philipsburg Manor, was later used as a tavern. Located on the well-traveled Albany Post Road, it became a landmark to local farmers and travelers. The frame structure, as it appears today, reflects the nineteenth century alterations to an earlier dwelling. The Jug Tavern, despite its alterations, is believed to be the oldest surviving structure in the riverfront area of Ossining. It is the only pre-Revolutionary building in the village. It is not clear how the Davis-Garrison House got the name "Jug Tavern," but Nathaniel Garrison may have sold liquor by the jug, without benefit of a license, as there is no record of a tavern license having been granted to any occupant of the house. A private owner sold the house to the Town of Ossining and the Ossining Restoration Committee in 1975, and the deed was transferred to the non-profit corporation Jug Tavern of Sparta Inc. in 1976.
DescriptionThe Jug Tavern is situated on the Old Albany Post Road (also known as Revolutionary Road) within the now largely suburban neighborhood of Sparta, in the Town of Ossining. Facing east, and prominently situated on a wooded lot against a stone cliff near the intersection of Rockledge Avenue, the native stone and frame structure has a foundation that dates to the third quarter of the eighteenth century. Alterations and additions since 1883 are responsible for its present appearance as a gable ended, clapboard sheathed, rectangular structure, built into a steep hillside with the east or front elevation exposed two and a half stories from grade. At the back of the house entry is made, at grate, into the second story. A small room at second store grade on the northwest corner was added at some time during the nineteenth century. An overhanging roof covers a second story, balustraded veranda across the full length of the east elevation facing the roadway. The front edge of the roof is supported by five plain posts rising from first story grade level through the veranda to the roofline. Each story on this elevation has four windows and two entry doors. The structure is two bays deep on the south elevation and three bays deep on the north elevation. The window and door casings, interior walls and hardware are modern. In some instances, later 19th century balloon framing has been added to the earlier mortise and tenon frame construction. The original fireplaces and chimneys, one at each end of the building, are now gone and the center brick flue is modern. This house was rebuilt in 1884 and renovated from 1975 to 1991.


PropertyRichard Austin House
MunicipalityOssining
CommunityOssining
Street Number196
Street AddressCroton Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  07/19/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  09/20/88
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  07/19/88
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerOssining Historical Society
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsOssining Historical Society Museum
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1872-3
Structural SystemWood Frame
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsA one-story gabled garage addition was constructed between 1911 and 1930. The original portion of the veranda has been enclosed, also probably between 1911 and 1930.
Date of AlterationsBetween 1911 and 1930

SignificanceThe Richard Austin House is a good surviving example of a late nineteenth century medium-sized middle class residence and illustrates the geographical and architectural development of the Hudson River village of Ossining. Better known to us today as the home of the Ossining Historical Society, this local landmark was probably built in 1872 by Richard Austin. There were only three subsequent owners after Austin’s tenure until the Historical Society acquired the building in 1970. Many of the fine features of the home have been retained and preserved by the Society.
DescriptionThe Richard Austin House, better known today as the Ossining Historical Society, stands on a corner lot about seventy feet south of a major through road of the community, Croton Avenue, and west of a residential dead end street, Bradshaw Drive. Most of the buildings near the structure are residential. The building is clapboard, 2 _ stories high, 3 bays wide at its main façade and 4 bays deep. A 2-_ story gabled extension is located on the house’s west façade. A one-story gabled garage addition stands to the rear of this extension. The slate-shingled center gable roof has three corbelled brick chimneys with stone caps. The lower three to four feet of the foundation walls is stone, with brick above. The main façade has a full-width veranda. The added veranda steps, concrete with flanking stone piers and a metal handrail, lead to the wood floor, with latticework below. The windows on the main façade are wood-sashed, with paired wood blinds, with 2-light casement types at the basement level and 2/2 double-hung types above. The first floor windows are larger than those on the second floor. The interior retains a great deal of its original materials and detail, including its heavily molded door and window surrounds, wood floors, and much of its original hardware, as well as many early lighting fixtures. The first floor features a central hall, living room, kitchen, and dining room and the second floor contains four bedrooms, a bathroom, and two closets. The attic above the second floor has unfinished walls. For more information on the Richard Austin House refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyScarborough Historic District
MunicipalityOssining
CommunityScarborough
Street Number
Street AddressAlbany Post Road; Revolutionary Road; Scarborough Road; Scarborough Station Road

Historic District NameScarborough Historic District
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status? Yes  09/07/84
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  08/06/84
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerVarious
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectMcKim,Mead and White, Multiple
Builder
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsDomestic, Education, Religion
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsLate Victorian, Mid-19th Century Revival
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsDomestic, Education, Religion
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsDomestic, Education, Religion
Structural ConditionGood
Neighborhood
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year BuiltVarious
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Scarborough Historic District contains seven historically and architecturally significant properties that reflect the settlement and growth of Scarborough, an unincorporated community in the town of Ossining, from the late eighteenth century through the early twentieth century. Included within its boundaries are a pre-Revolutionary War cemetery, distinctive examples of popular American Revival style architecture (Greek, Gothic, Renaissance, and Neoclassical) and formal landscape reflecting extensive turn-of-the-century (1900) estate development. The district’s large unchanged architectural, historic, and picturesque character is primarily the result of a small group of prominent local land owners who established country seats and churches above the Hudson River along the Albany Post Road in the suburban community of Scarborough.
DescriptionThe Scarborough Historic District in the towns of Ossining and Mount Pleasant is illustrative of growth and change in the area from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth centuries. Located on both sides of the Albany Post Road between the villages of North Tarrytown and Ossining, the district lies close to the Hudson River on the west. Twentieth-century suburban homes are located near the district. Comprised primarily of three estates, a school complex, a cemetery, and two religious properties, the 376-acre district is generally rural in character and sparsely developed. Most of the buildings are set on large parcels of land. The churches and school complex are clearly visible from Route 9, the district’s major thoroughfare; the majority of estate buildings are not. The six largest structures are each architecturally different and distinctive and the numerous related dependencies also vary stylistically. Stone and brick walls line Route 9 within the confines of the district. Although two of the larger properties have undergone changes, the character of the main structures remains primarily intact. For information on the structures within the Scarborough Historic District refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertySquire House (Highland Cottage)
MunicipalityOssining
CommunityOssining
Street Number36
Street AddressSouth Highland Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  07/22/82
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/16/82
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerEvelyn Squire Culp*
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleVictorian
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
Neighborhood
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1872
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceHighland Cottage, also known as the Squire House, is one of only four extant nineteenth-century concrete structures in Westchester County. Erected in 1872 and designed in a thoroughly eclectic manner, the residence, although advanced technologically, reflects the same stylistic considerations governing buildings of more traditional forms of masonry. Space within the structure has been used for a variety of purposes during the twentieth century, but the building has also continued to fulfill its original residential function and has remained virtually unaltered for one hundred and eight years.
DescriptionThe Squire House (also referred to as the Highland Cottage), an 1872 residence of concrete construction and eclectic design, is located on Highland Avenue (Route 9A) in Ossining. A variety of towers and dormers sit atop the building’s slate mansard roof, and Renaissance motifs are used on the exterior of the imposing building. Sited to provide three stories of living space on the main façade and four plus with a basement at the rear, the residence is constructed of cement blocks with dark brown wood trim and a heavily bracketed cornice. Concrete blocks of various sizes and shapes are also used decoratively as quoins and voussiors. The house has three chimneys, two of stuccoed brick and one of concrete block, and is separated from the street on two sides by a cement wall. The main façade has a square, engaged entrance bay tower. Two-story bay windows also project on the building’s north and south facades. The interior is characterized by strongly molded, dark Victorian woodwork, hardwood flooring, elaborate plaster ceilings, and Eastlake style decorative designs. Paneled main entrance doors with insets of frosted and etched glass open into a vestibule with a floor of Sing Sing marble and a Gothic vaulted ceiling with elaborate plaster bosses. The central staircase is of oak and rises three stories from the entry hall. Above the staircase at the roof level is a domed skylight. For more details on the Squire House refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertySt. Paul's Episcopal Church and Rectory (Calvary Baptist Church and Annex)
MunicipalityOssining
CommunityOssining
Street Number
Street AddressSt. Paul's Place

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  12/06/78
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerCalvary Baptist Church
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectCalvin Pollard
Builder
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1834
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsIn 1859, a brick chancel was added to the rear of the church. The 1870 wood and slate spire was damaged and removed in 1951.
Date of Alterations1859; 1951

SignificanceThe Calvary Baptist Church and Annex, formerly St. Pau's Episcopal Church and Rectory, were built during Ossining's nineteenth-century industrial boom. As the population grew, the local Episcopalians organized to build a suitable edifice. Calvin Pollard, noted New York City architect, designed the early Gothic Revival church in 1834. Locally quarried Sing Sing marble covers its well-proportioned exterior. The church is the best preserved early Gothic Revival church in Westchester County. It is also the earliest surviving religious structure in the village of Ossining. The 1864 rectory/annex is also a fine example of Gothic Revival architecture whose pointed arches and symmetry compliment the church. The church and annex form an architecturally significant group and are elegant reminders of Ossining’s nineteenth-century economic prosperity.
DescriptionThe Calvary Baptist Church is located on the north side of St. Paul’s Place, in the middle of the block, between Spring and State Streets. The annex is located across from the church. The complex is in a mixed-use area. Calvin Pollard designed the former Episcopal Church in the Gothic style in 1834. Sing Sing marble covers the exterior of the church. The stone has been left rough except where decorated details occur. Pointed arches frame windows, doors, and niches. Buttressing occurs at all corners. Blank niches with label moldings flank the central entrance tower. Tall stained glass windows with simple tracery punctuate the nave walls. The chancel boasts a large three-part central stained glass window. The 1870 wood and slate spire that crowned the entrance tower was damaged and removed in 1951. Significant interior features include exposed roof trusses, a large pointed chancel arch, south gallery, window and ceiling tracery. The 1864 rectory/annex is a large two and one-half story, three-bay brick residence. A one and one-half story wing projects from the rear of the building. The house’s Gothic detailing compliments the nearby church. Interior features include the main staircase, several decorative ceilings, window and door surrounds.


PropertyWashington School
MunicipalityOssining
CommunityOssining
Street Number83
Street AddressCroton Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  02/12/87
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  01/05/87
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerTechnical Support Services, Inc.
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectWilson Potter
BuilderJohn V. Schaefer, Jr.
Building TypeEducation
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsBeaux-Arts
Current UseCommercial
Current Use, Details
Original UseEducation
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1907
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Washington School in Ossining, New York is architecturally significant as a distinctive and highly intact example of Beaux-Arts style institutional architecture and progressive school design. Designed in 1907 by New York City architect Wilson Potter, a specialist in school architecture, the design of the Washington School is distinguished by its symmetrical massing and elevations, its classical architectural proportions and its fine brick and terra-cotta details. The building’s efficient floor plan, broad banks of classroom windows, extensive ventilation system, and the design of steel stairs at opposite ends of each corridor reflect a growing national concern for improved efficiency and higher standards of lighting, ventilation, and fire safety in the design of educational facilities during the first decade of the twentieth century. The Washington School symbolizes the village’s early twentieth century optimism and civic pride.
DescriptionThe Washington School, built in 1907, is a large brick and terra cotta Beaux-Arts style building with a T-shaped plan. The building is two stories in height above a raised basement story and includes a skylit attic story housed within a slate-covered hipped roof. The building is situated on a one-acre lot in the village of Ossining, New York, approximately one-quarter mile northeast of the village’s principal business district. The formal entrance façade of the school includes a segmentally arched grade level entrance at the center of the basement story enframed by a classically detailed terra cotta surround and containing paired wooden doors. The walls of the basement story are faced in tan brick, laid in rusticated bands. The second and third stories of the façade feature three window bays defined by paired brick pilasters and separated between stories by elaborate recessed terra cotta spandrels bearing the inscriptions "Science," "Languages," and "History." A terra cotta entablature and cornice extend across the full width of the façade and are detailed with modillion blocks directly above the three window bays. The rear side of the building includes an original single story auditorium wing with a raised basement. The interior of the former school building is essentially unaltered. Interior finishes remain intact and include narrow hardwood flooring in the corridors, plaster walls and ceilings, tile corridor wainscoting, wooden classroom doors with panels, windows, and three-light transoms, and simple classroom chair rails. For more details on the Washington School refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


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