MM, Amawalk

Photograph by Gray Williams

Historic Properties Listing

PropertyJoseph Purdy Homestead
MunicipalityNorth Salem
CommunityPurdys Station
Street Number
Street AddressJunction Route 22 and 116

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  01/25/73
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerJohn-Michael Hamlet
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseCommercial
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1776
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceA good example of a rural frame dwelling of the late 18th century, the Purdy Homestead is a landmark of importance to the story of local settlement and community development. In 1768 Joseph Purdy received a portion of the land obtained from the Van Cortlandt Family by his grandfather, Daniel Purdy. Joseph Purdy established mills at the confluence of the Titicus and Croton Rivers, and is known to have erected the central block of the present building in 1776. Beginning with Joseph Purdy’s mills, the Purdy family was responsible for the founding of the hamlet of Purdys, and for the promotion of industrial projects, including a woolen mill that produced cloth for military uniforms during the War of 1812. During the 1840s, Isaac Hart Purdy donated the land that brought the Harlem branch of the New York Central Railroad into northern Westchester County. The presence of the railroad, from New York City through Purdys to nearby Croton Falls, stimulated the growth of the surrounding countryside, and made Purdys a commercial depot.
DescriptionA simple but spacious frame structure, the L-shaped main block of the Purdy Homestead is composed of the original rectangular dwelling and a wing of similar proportions. To this main block have been added several one-story attached wings and shed additions. Standing two-and-a-half stories in height, the central block measures six bays in width on the south elevation, and seven bays on the east and west elevations. A central chimney heated the original dwelling while an interior end chimney served the rear wing. The wooden framing is sheathed with hand-hewn shingles on the main block, and clapboards on the later additions. Wood shingles cover the gable and shed roofs of the wings, and composition shingles cover the gable roof of the main block whose eaves are lined by brackets. The five-bay porch that extends the length of the front elevation, or the original dwelling, was added ca. 1870. Distinctive features of the interior include wide floorboards, original hardware and windowpanes, and exposed hand-hewn oak beams.


PropertyNorth Salem Town Hall
MunicipalityNorth Salem
Community
Street Number
Street AddressRoute 116

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  09/04/80
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  07/09/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerTown of North Salem
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderStephen De Lancey
Building TypeGovernment
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGeorgian Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseGovernment
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc.1770
Structural SystemWood Frame, Interlocking Joints
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsThe second floor has been altered to accommodate the former town library.
Date of Alterations1954

SignificanceNorth Salem Town Hall on Route 116 in northern Westchester County is a building of historical and architectural significance. Built as a manor house of Stephen DeLancey, a wealthy local landowner, the structure was briefly occupied by the Loyalist DeLancey family in 1773. Later, the building was remodeled as an academy and has served the community well for over two hundred years. The Town Hall has been referred to as the best vernacular example of Georgian architecture in Westchester County.
DescriptionLocated on Route 116 in North Salem, the town hall has been providing space for governmental and educational functions since 1773. The building, constructed on property part of the original Indian land grant in the area, was intended as a private home. Its builder, a Tory sympathizer, was forced to leave the village during the Revolutionary War. Three stories high, five bays wide, and three bays deep, the town hall, on a fieldstone foundation, is of frame construction faced in white clapboard. The gambrel roof, covered with wood shingles, has two brick chimneys and a central, six-sided frame cupola containing a Ziba Blakeslee bell. The roof of the cupola is of a bell-cast configuration and is topped with a weather vane. The main façade has a detailed cornice with a line of modillions and a center gable end over the entrance bay. Beneath the window is a Palladian window. There is a stone-floored porch in front of the entrance bay. Columns support the roof of the porch. The first floor interior of the town hall, designed in the Georgian tradition around a central hall, contains low ceilings, wide floorboards, chair rails, and cased and beaded posts and beams. Of note are the three brick fireplaces and a bake oven. A vaulted ceiling distinguishes the second level, of which the floor has been replaced and the space altered to accommodate the town library. Despite varied uses and some renovations during its two-hundred-year history, the structure's eighteenth-century origins remain clearly recognizable, and much original fabric is still intact. For further details on the North Salem Town Hall refer to the files at the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyUnion Hall
MunicipalityNorth Salem
Community
Street Number
Street AddressRoute 116 and Keeler Ln.

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  08/28/86
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  07/24/86
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerMatthew Sutphin
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeCommercial
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleItalianate
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseCommercial
Current Use, Details
Original UseCommercial
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1865
Structural SystemWood Frame, Interlocking Joints
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsMinor alterations to the exterior include: basement level French doors on the south and rear elevations and a single door and large multi-pane window on the basement level north elevation.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceUnion Hall is architecturally significant as a rare surviving example of a nineteenth-century wood-frame commercial building in the town of North Salem that recalls an important episode in the area’s nineteenth-century growth and development. Built in 1865, Union Hall was part of a small thriving farming community and functioned as a store, meeting hall, stagecoach stop, and residence. As a result of its commercial and public use in the agrarian town of North Salem, the building became the center for local community affairs and is a well-recognized landmark. The building and its barn retain a high level of architectural integrity and exhibit numerous features that are characteristic of the tastes of the period.
DescriptionUnion Hall is located in the rural, northern Westchester town of North Salem. This wood-frame commercial building is situated close to Route 116 at the southeast corner of Keeler Lane. The immediate area around the hall has scattered historic buildings. The large rectangular building has a two-bay main façade facing Route 116 and wide four-bay side elevations. The rear of the building has a four-story rear elevation. Unpainted clapboard sheathes the entire building, which sits on a stone foundation and has a gable roof. The hall is in the Italianate style. The first floor storefront has central double doors flanked by multi-pane store windows with paneled aprons. A pair of double, four-over-four windows with segmentally arched frames punctuate the second floor. The building retains numerous original interior finishes and trim on all floors. Most of the rooms have smooth plaster walls and simple door and window surrounds. A large, undecorated meeting hall fills the entire second floor, which has been partially divided at its center. Also on site is a mid-nineteenth century barn. Mature trees, shrubs, sloping lawns, and low stonewalls enhance the property.


Select from below to view properties associated with each municipality