John Jones and Two Wives, Van Cortlandtville

Photograph by Gray Williams

Historic Properties Listing

PropertyDavenport House
MunicipalityNew Rochelle
Community
Street Number157
Street AddressDavenport Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/30/80
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerTheodore Greene
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectAndrew Jackson Davis
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1859
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsAdditions were put on the house in 1871 (south wing), 1875 (north wing), and 1912 (enlarged north wing, larger entrance and stair hall). In 1922 the south wing was remodeled into a ballroom. In recent years the home was repaired.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe picturesque Davenport House (1859) is architecturally significant as an example of a Gothic Revival cottage. The center of the house was designed by Andrew Jackson Davis, one of America's leading 19th-century Gothic Revival architects. Late 19th and early 20th century architect-designed additions flank the cottage, but do not substantially detract from its original appearance. Few, if any, unaltered mid-19th century examples of Gothic Revival architecture survive in New Rochelle. Thus, the Davenport House is a particular important local residential design.
DescriptionThe Davenport House is located in a densely built-up residential section of New Rochelle. The sprawling, two-story house is one of the largest in the area and is deeply set back on a small rectangular lot. The heavily planted property boasts mature trees, numerous bushes, a large front lawn, a circular driveway and stone entrance pillars with wrought-iron gates on Davenport Road. The center portion of the house was built in 1859 and designed by Andrew Jackson Davis, one of America’s leading 19th century Gothic Revival architects. The original one and one-half story stone cottage now has a hip roof with prominent central gables, symmetrical chimneys, and numerous diamond-paned windows. The original cottage was enlarged several times. In 1871, a one-story wing, also designed by Davis, was added to the south. It consisted of a library and billiard room that was connected to the cottage by a small, glazed conservatory. In 1875, a one-story north wing, designed by Frederick H. Coles, was added to the house. Around 1912, the New York City firm, Parish and Schroeder, enlarged the north wing and created a large entrance and stair hall. The interiors of the cottage and its period additions are largely unchanged. Original A.J. Davis details include crenellated cornices, in the parlor and dining room, original marble mantelpieces, and decorative corbels in two second-floor bedrooms.


PropertyFirst Presbyterian Church and Lewis Pintard House
MunicipalityNew Rochelle
Community
Street Number
Street AddressPintard Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  09/27/79
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerFirst Presbyterian Church of New Rochelle
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectJohn Russell Pope
Builder
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleColonial Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityMoved
Date MovedHouse moved in 1928
Year Built1928
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsThere have been no alterations or additions on the church. The steeple and outside trim have been repainted on occasions. The masonry has been repointed. Between 1926 and 1928, the Lewis Pintard House was moved slightly to the left to make room for the Church and the house was turned around to face Pintard Avenue. At that time the side wing was disconnected and became a Boy Scout House and the garage. Four dormer windows were put on over the front porch, replacing a single stained-glass dormer window that now rests on the front peak of the back wing of the house. In addition, an arched, covered breezeway was built to connect the side entrance of the church.
Date of Alterations1926-28 (House)

SignificanceThe First Presbyterian Church of New Rochelle, and its manse, the Lewis Pintard House, represent two separate and important stages in the history of the church's congregation and the growth of the surrounding community. The church, designed in 1928 by John Russell Pope, received the Christian Herald award for 1929. Prominent members of the community and the church's early congregation owned the eighteenth-century manse. It has been used for church-related activities for over two hundred years, is a visible record of the changing needs of its occupants, and a rare survivor in a densely built-up area. The church and manse are historically and architecturally significant and their prominent location reflects the continuing influence of the descendents and institutions of New Rochelle’s first settlers.
DescriptionThe Presbyterian Church of New Rochelle and its manse, the eighteenth-century Lewis Pintard House, stand on a three-acre site on Pintard Avenue. Immediately surrounding the church property on all sides is residential housing; to the west, one block away, are Main and Huguenot Streets and the city’s central business district. In 1926, the 1860 church that the Presbyterian congregation was using burned and they retained John Russell Pope to construct a new one. Elements of the congregation’s two earlier church were utilized by encasing the doorstep of the first (1697) in a wall of the new structure’s Tower Room, and incorporating material from the 1860 church into the exterior of the twentieth-century building. Constructed of dressed fieldstone with granite quoins, white wood trim, and a copper roof, the Colonial Revival church is three bays wide and five bays deep. The main façade has a large-scale portico with four Ionic columns and a gabled pediment. The interior features a central aisle, flanked by Ionic pilasters with side aisles that are delineated by columns on pedestals. The walls are white plaster. The main space is two stories high and a groin-vaulted ceiling covers the transept. The large windows flood the nave with light and there are three stained glass windows in the apse. The plan of the church is a modified cruciform. The manse, the Lewis Pintard House, is connected to the church with an arched walkway. It is one-half stories high, of white clapboard, on a fieldstone foundation. The earliest section of the house is five bays wide, two bays deep, and has a gabled roof, dentilled cornice, and brick chimney. One addition forms a three-bay deep, one-bay wide, two-story high extension to the rear of the house. The interior of the manse expresses its early date of construction most visibly through the hand-hewn beams in the cellar. Significant elements in the original section include the narrow curving cantilevered staircase in the entrance hall and the pilastered fireplace surround in the living room. For further details on the Presbyterian Church of New Rochelle and the Lewis Pintard House refer to the files at the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyKnickerbocker Press Building
MunicipalityNew Rochelle
Community
Street Number50-52
Street AddressWebster Ave.

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  04/05/00
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/11/00
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  04/05/00
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerKnickerbocker New Rochelle, LLC
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeIndustrial
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleColonial Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsMultiple dwelling, offices, artists' lofts
Original UseIndustrial
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1891-92; 1914
Structural SystemMetal and Timber
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe recent rehabilitation converted four of the sections into residential lofts. The rehabilitation included the introduction of a new elevator and circulation core at the center of the building and removal of the stairs and elevator in the old circulation tower. In addition, the 1950-51 section of the building has been converted into office and artists' lofts.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Knickerbocker Press Building in New Rochelle is historically significant in the area of architecture as a distinctive example of a Dutch Colonial Revival industrial building in Westchester County. It is also significant in the area of industry for its association with the important publishing firm of G.P. Putnam's Sons. The building was constructed over a period of years beginning c. 1891 and was the manufacturing plant for the firm until c. 1934. The name "Knickerbocker Press" probably served as a tribute to author Washington Irving, who was a close friend of founder George Palmer Putnam and an important author on the publisher's list. Of the many eclectic architectural styles in vogue at the turn of the century, the Dutch Colonial Revival was especially popular in areas of early Dutch settlement like New York's Hudson River Valley. The use of this particular style often promoted a sense of local identity and expressed nostalgia for a quaint and peaceful colonial past. For more about the history of the Knickerbocker Press Building and its significance refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.
DescriptionThe Knickerbocker Press Building is located in New Rochelle. The property is bounded by Webster Avenue to the east, residential properties to the south and west, and Amtrak’s Harlem River Line to the north. The building is a large brick structure distinguished by its central circulation tower and stepped gable parapets - a popular motif of the Dutch Revival style. The foundation is of stone. It is composed of five major connected sections. The 3.5-story main block dates to c. 1891-92. It was expanded by a 2-story ell to the west constructed in two campaigns between 1897-1910. Around 1914, the 3-story gable-front building and the 4-story stair tower were attached directly to the south and east of the first section. In addition, a 3-story gable-front warehouse building was added around 1914. In 1950-51, another 3-story addition was constructed. Each of the sections varies in bay width and length. On the slopes of the gable roof, the words "THE KNICKERBOCKER PRESS" are spelled out in faded green slate shingles on a field of dark gray slate shingles. The recent rehabilitation converted four of the sections into residential lofts. The rehabilitation included the introduction of a new elevator and circulation core at the center of the building and removal of the stairs and elevator in the old circulation tower. Exposed steel and timber framing, wood plank floors and unplastered brick walls are typical conditions throughout the site. Some of the original finishes and fixtures of the Knickerbocker Press office remain. In addition, the 1950-51 section of the building has been converted into office and artists’ lofts. No printing equipment survives in any of the buildings. For more details on the Knickerbocker Press Building refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyLeland Castle
MunicipalityNew Rochelle
Community
Street Number29
Street AddressCastle Place

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  08/27/76
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerThe College of New Rochelle
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectWilliam Thomas Beers
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseEducation
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1855-59
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsAttic rooms have been subdivided, and on the second floor a small chapel was installed in a former bedroom. The marble fireplace that was originally in the drawing room was moved to a second floor bedroom. In 1926, lightning destroyed the wooden parapet of the rear north tower; an elevator was put in place to replace the spiral staircase. In 1974, fire regulations required the installation of an interior staircase in the square tower. One window has been replaced by a fire door. The original gas lighting has long since been replaced by electric light.
Date of AlterationsVarious

SignificanceBuilt during the years 1855-1859 for Simeon Leland, a wealthy hotel entrepreneur from New York City, "Castleview" was designed by New York architect William Thomas Beers as an English Gothic country residence to suit a family with substantial means and a taste for the picturesque eclectic style. The frequently visited and widely admired home was used by the Leland family as first a summer, and then later, as a year round residence until 1880. After a series of short-term uses as a hunting club, hotel and boarding school, the residence was purchased by the Ursuline Sisters and is still used by them as part of the campus of the College of New Rochelle. It is the only surviving example of the work of William Thomas Beers.
DescriptionOnce the focal point of a large country estate, Leland Castle (1855-59) is today part of an assemblage of college buildings in an older residential neighborhood in New Rochelle. The original main structure is a two and a half story approximately rectangular building 130 feet wide by 88 feet deep. Its load bearing walls are constructed of broken course, cut granite masonry. Its Gothic Revival exterior is enhanced on the southeast corner by a tall, square tower, on the northeast by an hexagonal one, and on the northwest by a round tower 100 feet in height, each with crenellated galleries. Asymmetry of masses prevails throughout. On the front of the building is a bay window to the north of the main entrance. The fenestration of the second and third stories is also asymmetrical. On the third floor, dormers, gables, turrets, and battlements conceal portions of the flat, pitched, and domed roof. The main entrance on the eastern façade is framed by a Gothic pointed arch. Tall, black walnut doors ornamented with lion’s heads are flanked by slender sidelights crowned with Gothic tracery. All windows are decorated with Gothic tracery and capped with heavily molded labels. The entrance hall contains original black paneling, tiled floor, and stained and etched glass. The first floor rooms are in the Renaissance style with round arched doorways. For more information on Leland Castle refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyLispenard-Rodman-Davenport House
MunicipalityNew Rochelle
Community
Street Number180
Street AddressDavenport Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  09/22/86
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  08/04/86
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerLouis A. Ferguson
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsVictorian
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc1708- c1920
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsColonial Revival details were added to the southwest parlor and entry hall in 1915. The gambrel roof was resheathed with asphalt shingles in the 20th century. The present owner replaced flooring from the Victorian period renovation with old wide boards and restored the fireplace paneling in the northwest parlor to a 18th century appearance.
Date of AlterationsVarious

SignificanceThe Lispenard-Rodman-Davenport House is a home located in New Rochelle that displays three architectural styles that embody distinctive characteristics of its type, period, and method of construction. The house evolved from a pioneer stone structure built by a Huguenot close to the end of the 17th century to a full-scale mid-18th southern New York Dutch vernacular farmhouse type and finally to a Victorian period suburban country seat inspired by a romantic Picturesque taste. These stages of development reflect the changing lifestyles and design taste in New Rochelle as it grew from a coastal settlement to a maritime center and residential satellite of New York City and convey a sense of the area’s history over two centuries. Additional significance is derived from the association of occupants of the house with the history of Davenport Neck. For further information on the house’s significance and its owners refer to the files at the Westchester County Historical Society.
DescriptionThe Lispenard-Rodman-Davenport House is located in the city of New Rochelle on a 200-acre peninsula known as Davenport Neck along Westchester County’s Long Island South coastline. The property has now been reduced in size to a one-acre suburban lot. The house includes the remains of one of the earliest homes in the city (c1690-1710) and reputedly the oldest surviving house in New Rochelle. In its present appearance, the house is a two-story, center-hall building, two rooms deep, with an attached kitchen dependency. The basement and first levels of the main portion of the house are constructed of load bearing random course stone masonry. The second level is formed by nearly vertical planes of a gambrel-type roof and its frame clapboard ends. There are five dormers on the front façade and two interior brick chimneys flank a central cupola. The roof is sheathed with asphalt shingles, which were added by an owner in the 20th century. The interior has undergone many alterations; today the interior details are in the Victorian style. Also on site are a well, a barn, and a modern frame two-car garage. For details on the Lispenard-Rodman-Davenport House refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyNew Rochelle Post Office
MunicipalityNew Rochelle
Community
Street Number255
Street AddressNorth Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  05/11/89
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/11/89
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  05/11/89
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerUnited States Postal Service
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectFrost; Hart and Shape
BuilderDavid Hutchinson, artist
Building TypeGovernment
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsModern
Current UseGovernment
Current Use, Details
Original UseGovernment
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1937-8
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe interior public lobby has been considerably altered. Some of the areas have been subdivided into offices. The screenline on the curved interior wall has been altered. The exterior window sashes have been replaced.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe New Rochelle Post Office is artistically significant for its distinctive intact group of murals commissioned by the United States Treasury Department as part of the public works projects initiated to relieve unemployment during the Great Depression. The murals were painted by David Hutchinson, a local artist, and installed in the two-year-old post office in 1940. The three large murals are typical of Depression-era public artwork in that they were painted in a realistic style and that the subject matter depicts scenes of local history. These murals are distinguished, however, by their large size and irregular shape, designed specifically to be accommodated in the large lobby space. The New Rochelle Post Office murals are one of eighty mural and sculpture projects commissioned for New York State post offices by the Section of Fine Arts between 1935 and 1942.
DescriptionThe New Rochelle Post Office is located on North Avenue in New Rochelle and is situated on a trapezoidal-shaped corner lot facing the intersection of North Avenue and Huguenot Street. North Avenue contains mostly two-story commercial, public, and residential buildings. The post office is one story in height and irregular in shape with principal facades parallel to both streets. The building is set back from the street behind narrow areaways with railings. The central three-bay portion of the building is curved around the corner and is higher than the straight facades, which are twelve bays wide on Huguenot Street and six bays wide on North Avenue. The facades are surmounted by simple limestone coping and a flat roof. Curved granite steps lead to a terrace along the corner with a flagpole in the center. The facades are clad in orange-red brick that replaced the original terracotta panels at an unknown date. The three tall openings on the corner still contain their original glass blocks. The interior public lobby has been considerably altered. Some of the areas have been subdivided into offices. The floors appear to be the original terrazzo and there is some ceramic tile wainscoting remaining. Local artist, David Hutchinson, painted the murals on the interior walls in 1940.


PropertyPioneer Building
MunicipalityNew Rochelle
Community
Street Number14
Street AddressLawton Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  02/08/84
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  11/23/83
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerCreative Food Service
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
BuilderJohn New and Son
Building TypeCommercial
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleItalianate
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseCommercial
Current Use, Details
Original UseCommercial
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodCommercial
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1892
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe rear of the building, which originally housed newspaper printing presses, now contains the test kitchens of the Creative Food Service. The second floor has also been altered.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Pioneer Building represents an important aspect in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century history of New Rochelle. The commercial office building was constructed in 1892 to house New Rochelle's first newspaper, a weekly called 'The Pioneer.' The city's first circulating library was also located in the building. Situated in the central business district, the structure is a representative, largely intact example of a medium-size, late nineteenth century commercial building. It exhibits high quality materials, workmanship and Italianate inspired decoration. The locally important Pioneer Building played an important role in New Rochelle's turn-of-the-century development.
DescriptionThe Pioneer Building is a medium size, late nineteenth century commercial/office structure located on a secondary side street in the heart of New Rochelle’s downtown business district. The two-story, four-bay brick building fills its long and narrow rectangular lot. It is presently surrounded by parking lots on three sides and is an isolated historic building on the south side of Lawton Street. The Pioneer Building was slated for demolition in the 1970s until the New York State Historic Preservation Office recognized its National Register potential. The building's main façade is covered in a high quality buff-color, iron spot brick. Painted common brick covers the remaining three elevations. The first floor of the main façade is composed of two storefronts with central entrances and flanking bay windows. A separate east side entrance provides access to the second floor. The building has a distinctive, elaborately decorated metal cornice. The unadorned side elevations were recently decorated with trompe-l'oeil painting. The rear of the building drops down to one story. Flat roofs cover the front and rear sections. They have simple stone lintels and sills. Two chimneys project from the west side roof. The most intact sections of the building’s interior are found in the two first floor storefronts and east side entrance hall. These areas retina original finishes, door and window trim, some wood wainscoting, and decorated pressed-metal ceilings.


PropertyRochelle Heights Historic District
MunicipalityNew Rochelle
Community
Street Number
Street AddressThe Circle, The Boulevard, The Serpentine, Hamilton Avenue, and others

Historic District NameRochelle Heights Historic District
Local Landmark Status?Yes  05/27/05
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  05/27/05
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerVarious
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectNathan F. Barrett (Rochelle Park)
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleQueen Anne, Shingle
Architectural Style, DetailsColonial and Tudor Revival
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1885
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Rochelle Park - Rochelle Heights Historic District is historically and architecturally significant as an intact and distinctive example of residential park development at the turn of the twentieth century. Laid out in 1885, Rochelle Park is particularly distinguished as one of the first planned residential subdivisions in Westchester County, one of the most historic suburban areas in the United States. The landscape plan for Rochelle Park was designed by Nathan F. Barrett for the Manhattan Life Insurance Company. Rochelle Park epitomizes the design principles for suburban development that Barrett, Frederic Law Olmstead and others advocated following the creation a Central Park. Rochelle Heights was laid out by New York architects Mann, MacNeille, and Lindeberg for the Sickles Estate Improvement Company in 1905. Its western section was shared a boundary and was interconnected with Rochelle Park. Its landscape development was more spare and efficient. The architecture of Rochelle Heights does not have the same uniformity of design as Rochelle Park; rather it reflects the diversity of the scale and style of suburban housing in the early twentieth century. The combined historic district extends the continuum of suburban design history back to 1885 when the phenomenon first took hold in the United States.
DescriptionThe Rochelle Park - Rochelle Heights Historic District is located on the east side of North Avenue, an artery running north of the commercial center of the City of New Rochelle. Rochelle Park was one of the first residential parks laid out in New Rochelle, and its asymmetrical plan and large house lots set it apart from the others. In aggregate, the plan of Rochelle Park combined a variety of design options in a single residential development. It also provided a hierarchy of lot size and value so that a range of buyers could be accommodated. In both plan and design, both of these planned residential communities retain a high level of material and visual integrity with limited alterations having been made. The Rochelle Park - Rochelle Heights Historic District contains 349 contributing properties and 23 noncontributing buildings, 212 contributing outbuildings, 4 contributing structures, 48 contributing sites and 25 noncontributing features. For more information on the Rochelle Heights Historic District refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertySt. John's Church, Wilmot
MunicipalityNew Rochelle
Community
Street Number11
Street AddressWilmot Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/07/99
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectAlexander Durand
Builder
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
Neighborhood
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1859
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsChurch: The brick chimney and single skylight are twentieth century additions. The bell tower was restored in 1960. The church’s secondary entrance is contained in a flat-roofed one bay square addition, a 1966 extension of the 1881 sacristy. The interior plaster walls were restored in 1991. The present electric Allen organ was installed in 1997. Schoolhouse: The current entrance light fixtures were installed in 1931, when the building was used as the Precinct 2 police station. A large two-story brick wing was added in 1950. Carriage shed: The shed was converted to a cottage in 1921. In 1990 the building was rehabilitated for congregational use.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceSt. John's Church Wilmot, constructed in 1859, is the oldest extant edifice for religious worship in the City of New Rochelle and was briefly, until December 1860, a mission of New Rochelle's Trinity Episcopal Church. The land on which the church and its ancillary buildings stand was, during the eighteenth and nineteenth century, part of the Cox farm. Daniel Cox, a prominent local resident and a congregation member donated the property for the benefit of Trinity Church parishioners living in this section of the New Rochelle area, then called Cooper's Corners. Designed and constructed by Alexander Durand, the building stands on a foundation of local Tuckahoe marble.
DescriptionThe 1-1/4 acre property incorporates the Gothic Revival church, 1859, originally clapboard now covered with aluminum siding; the former schoolhouse, constructed 1830 on 1795 foundation, also aluminum siding over original clapboard, with 1950 brick addition; a board-and-batten former carriage shed, constructed c. 1795, converted to a cottage in 1921, restored to a carriage shed configuration in 1990; and a Tudor Revival residence, the former church rectory, built in 1923. Also part of the church property are a stone perimeter wall (north and west) and two stone gate posts with Gothic details flanking the original Wilmot Road entrance; mature trees, including a copper beech planted in 1932 in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the birth of George Washington; gardens and garden furniture; a columbarium; interior walkways and a small plaza fronting the main church entrance. The plaza pavement surrounds a compass rose. Behind (south of) St. Francis Cottage in a 12-car parking lot. For more details on St. John's Wilmot Church Complex refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyThomas Paine Cottage
MunicipalityNew Rochelle
Community
Street Number20
Street AddressSicard Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  11/28/72
National Historic Landmark Status? Yes  
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerHuguenot and New Rochelle Historical Association
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleSalt Box
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsMuseum
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionFair
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityMoved
Date Moved1908
Year Built1784
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Thomas Paine Cottage was the home from 1802 until 1806 of Thomas Paine, master pamphleteer and propagandist for the War for Independence and for the Rights of Man. The cottage stands on a farm, originally containing 277 acres and once the property of Frederick Davoue, a Tory during the War for Independence, which was confiscated by the State of New York and granted to Thomas Paine in 1784 in recognition of his merit and services during the war. In 1809 he was buried on the farm. His cottage was moved in 1909 about one-fourth of a mile from its original site to its present location. The house, however, is still located on his farm and is adjacent to the site when Paine was buried as in 1809.
DescriptionThe Thomas Paine Cottage is a small two-story frame house of the saltbox type with a central chimney and a gable roof with a long slope to the rear. Exterior walls are covered with shingles. The oldest portion of the cottage is 16 feet wide and 31 feet deep. A one-story frame wing about 18 feet wide and 23 feet deep, with a porch across its front, was added to the cottage in 1804. The main house is three bays wide and has the entrance set in the right-hand bay. There are three rooms set one behind the other in the main house - the kitchen in front, a small room in the center heated by a Franklin stove, which was presented to Paine by its inventor, and a bedroom in the rear. The wing to the right, now utilized as a caretaker's apartment, contains a parlor. There are four bedrooms on the second floor. The entrance door and the square pillars of the porch on the wing are Greek Revival and were added about 1830. The exterior wood shingles are replacements of the originals. The wide board flooring, frame, plaster walls, and chair rails are original. The cottage was moved to its present site on the corner of Paine’s farm in 1908 in order to save the building when the remainder of his farmland was subdivided. Near the Paine Cottage stands the Thomas Paine Monument, erected in 1839 and topped by a bronze bust of Paine by Wilson McDonald that was added in 1881. The monument, owned by the City of New Rochelle, was located at its present site in 1905. Also standing near the Thomas Paine Cottage is the Thomas Paine Memorial Building, a two-story stone structure erected by the Thomas Paine National Historical Association in 1925. The Memorial Building contains a number of Paine’s personal effects and exhibits of his writings.


PropertyTrinity -St. Paul's Episcopal Church
MunicipalityNew Rochelle
Community
Street Number311
Street AddressHuguenot Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  06/07/06
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  07/25/06
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/07/06
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building Type
Building Type, Details
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current Use
Current Use, Details
Original Use
Original Use, Details
Structural Condition
Neighborhood
Threats to Building
Site Integrity
Date Moved
Year Built
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

Significance
Description


PropertyUnion Baptist Church
MunicipalityNew Rochelle
Community
Street Number438
Street AddressMain Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  10/15/93
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerCongregation of the Union Baptist Church
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectFletcher and Jennings
BuilderV.J. Hedden and Sons
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsNeo-Romanesque
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1904
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsSteeple removed from bell tower, 1946; main entrance side lighting fixtures removed and protective outer doors, replacement metal railings and signs added to main entrance; decorated door hinges on north entrances added in 1949 renovation; replacement asphalt shingles; west exterior double doors; Wurlitzer electric organ installed in 1949; lighting fixtures possibly early-twentieth century replacements. Attic window replaced by vent on rear dormer, west façade. Replacement double doors at south entrance. One-story storage stucco and concrete block additions at the southeast corner of the building. Main façade central round-headed window wood molding lost.
Date of Alterations1946; 1949

SignificanceThe Union Baptist Church, originally the Salem Baptist Church, completed to the designs of architect Arthur Bates Jennings (1849-1927), is a fine example of the Neo-Romanesque style. In addition, the building is one of the few houses of worship in Westchester, and the only one in New Rochelle, illustrative of the open, oblique spatial arrangement, popular at the turn of the century, known as the Akron Plan. The church played a brief role in the national defense during the First World War when it housed some of the overflow of soldiers that had exceeded the capacity of the nearby Fort Slocum, which was then an important staging area for troops bound for France. The building's construction of Tuckahoe marble reflects the robustness of Westchester local industry of the time.
DescriptionCenter city site, .28 acre, incorporating a two-story hipped roof stone church, constructed in 1904, with a stone, brick and asbestos shingled extension, original to the building, and two small later rear additions; a two-and-one-half story c. 1900 parsonage, now clad in asbestos shingles; a stone perimeter wall with a wrought iron fence; and an interior walkway between the church and the parsonage. The sanctuary section of the church is constructed of rough-dressed randomly coursed ashlar Tuckahoe marble with a water table at the level of the raised basement. The asphalt shingled hip roof, with exposed rafters ends and cross gables on the north and east, terminates in an octagonal louvered ventilator. A chimney of buff-colored brick is located at the juncture between the building’s two sections. Sanctuary fenestration is primarily wood frame and sash double-hung windows, flat-arched on the first story and round-arched above, most with lead-camed multicolored stained glass, all with marble sills. The main façade is framed by a two-story flat-roofed square projecting bay with secondary entrance and a three-story bell tower recessed behind the main entrance. Interior features in the sanctuary include stenciled ceilings with molded beams, vertical board wainscoting, multicolored intermediate cornices, and pews curved to face the pulpit. The ancillary extension is 2 _ stories in heights, five bays deep and seven bays wide with a marble foundation. Much of the original detail remains in this extension. The parsonage, an American Four-Square style building with Colonial Revival detail, is primarily intact. For more details on the Union Baptist Church refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyWildcliff
MunicipalityNew Rochelle
Community
Street Number42
Street AddressWildcliff Road, Hudson Park

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  11/02/02
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  01/16/03
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  11/02/02
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerCity of New Rochelle
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectAlexander Jackson Davis
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, DetailsTudor Revival
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsTheater
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1852
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Gothic Revival style villa known as Wildcliff is an excellent example of the picturesque villa designs of Alexander Jackson Davis, one of the preeminent American architects of the nineteenth century. It has a complex building history, beginning with the construction of a modestly sized Gothic Revival villa in the northeastern portion of Davenport’s Neck. The house is representative of the villa form and style that Davis popularized, both in his own buildings and in the designs that he supplied to Andrew Jackson Downing’s influential domestic style books.
DescriptionWildcliff, a Gothic Revival residence built c. 1852 and subsequently enlarged, is located east of Wildcliff Road, near the northeastern end of Davenport’s Neck, in the city of New Rochelle. The structure is located on the edge of a largely residential section of New Rochelle. Wildcliff is a 2 _ story building of rubble stone faced primarily with a variety of Westchester stones of various colors. The house has a gray granite watertable, located approximately three feet above the ground, and gray granite window lintels and sills. The most prominent visual feature of the house is a series of projecting gables of varying sizes and heights, each with steep roof slopes and a wooden bargeboard; each gable was probably originally crowned by a finial. The roof slopes were originally clad with wood shingles, but these were covered with gray slate shingles sometime after 1919. The interior retains much of its historic plan and some historic fittings, but much of the interior detail has been lost. The house has a one-story modern addition on the south elevation. On the grounds of the property are remnants of stone retaining and freestanding walls, a wrought-iron fence, and a stone entry pier, as well as modern chain-link fences, and a wooden outdoor stage. For details on Wildcliff refer to the files at the Westchester County Historical Society.


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