Eleazar Hart House, Yonkers

Photograph by Gray Williams

Historic Properties Listing

PropertyChappaqua Railroad Depot and Depot Plaza - Horace Greeley Related Site
MunicipalityNew Castle
CommunityBanksville
Street Number200
Street AddressSouth Greeley Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  04/19/79
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerTown of New Castle
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeGovernment
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleCraftsman
Architectural Style, Details
Current Use
Current Use, DetailsRailway Station
Original Use
Original Use, DetailsRailway Station
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodCommercial
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1901-1902
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsOver time the station interior has been altered to suit the needs of modern day railway transportation and contemporary commuters. The exterior remains substantially unchanged.
Date of Alterations1900s

SignificanceImportant as part of the overall Greeley family connection to Chappaqua. The land on which it stands was part of the original Greeley farm, and it was given to the community by Horace Greeley's daughter in furtherence of his wishes.
DescriptionThe railroad came to Chappequa in 1846 and by 1900 the original wooden station was no longer adequate for the growing community. Horace Greeley's daughter, Gabrielle, gave the town some two acres of land upon which a new depot was errected 1901-1902. Constructed of fieldstone with porte- cochere and tile roof in a rusticated Arts and Crafts mode, the building was fronted by a public park. While there have been alterations to the interior, the building exterior remains largely unchanged. For more detail as to the structure and site see files held by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyChurch of Saint Mary the Virgin - Horace Greeley Related Site
MunicipalityNew Castle
CommunityBanksville
Street Number191
Street AddressSouth Greeley Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  04/19/79
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerChurchRector,Church Wardens andVestrymen
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectMorgan M. O'Brien
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1904-1905
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsAlterations to the church proper have been relatively minor. In 1924 a carillon was added; and, then in 1951 the first floor of a Parish House was constructed, followed in 1954 by a second floor. The Baptistry was completed the following year.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Church of Saint Mary the Virgin is important both for its close association with the Greeley family and as an important example of a Gothic Revival religious building. Not only is it rare in its being a near replica of a c.1400 English church, but it also houses a six hundred year old window taken from that very church.
DescriptionErrected by Gabrielle Greeley and her husband, Reverend Frank M. Clendenin as a private chapel dedicated to their deceased daugter, Muriel; the Church of Saint Mary the Virgin is now a functioning branch of the Episcopal Church.In the traditional cruciform layout with a square crenelated tower, it was built as a replica of and named for a fifteenth century church in Monken Hadley, Middlesex, England. It stands on a slight rise backed by an impressive pine grove planted by Horace Greeley in the 1850s. Further construction details may be obtained from files held by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyGreeley House - Horace Greeley Related Site
MunicipalityNew Castle
CommunityBanksville
Street Number100
Street AddressKing Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  04/19/79
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerChappequa Historical Society
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleColonial Vernacular
Architectural Style, Details
Current Use
Current Use, DetailsHistorical Society headquarters
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1820
Structural SystemWood Frame, Interlocking Joints
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsOver the course of time the Greeley House has undergone extensive restoration and alteration. Originally built, c. 1820, as a small center chimney house, it was extended to the east about one-third its origional width around 1850; at which time Victorian details were added, including French Windows, a piazza, balcony and interior decorative moldings and fireplace surrounds. In 1940, the house was substantially refurbished. Then, in 1945, a one story rear addition was added; and, in 1963, this was raised to two stories. Since ownership has passed to the Chappequa Historical Society, attempts have been made to restore the building to its appearance at the time of the Greeley occupation including removal of an inappropriate bay window.
Date of Alterationsc. 1850; 1940, 1945, 1963, 1990s

SignificanceHome to the Greeley family from its purchase in 1864 until 1873, this building is the only residence of Horace Greeley now standing. Architecturally, it is not particularly significant but its association with the famous newspaperman, statesman and conservationist makes it one of the most important structures in Westchester County.
DescriptionProbably built around 1820 as a center chimney vernacular farm house, the Greeley House was purchased by the family in 1864 due, primarily to Mary Mary Greeley's unhappiness with the isolated location of their first "House in the Woods". By the time the Greeleys purchased it the building had been "Victorianized" with a two bay extension, a full length piazza topped by an unroofed balcony onto which opened French doors and numerous interior details. It remained largely this way until sold by Gabrielle Greeley Clendinin in 1926. Used primarily as a rental property, the structure was in such a state of disrepair that in 1940 it was slated for demolition. It was, fortunatly, sold to people who restored it and opened a gift shop. Over the next half century various additions including a bay window and a two story rear extension appeared. The house has now passed into the hands of the local historical society assuring its preservation. For more information, see the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyIsaac Young House
MunicipalityNew Castle
Community
Street Number114
Street AddressPinesbridge Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  07/19/04
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  08/30/04
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  07/19/04
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerBarrett and Jane Clark
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsSecond Empire
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1872
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsInterior alterations that took place prior to 1961 (the year the current owner bought the house from the Young family) include the addition of plumbing on the second floor, the alteration of the kitchen to include brick walls; the enclosure of part of the rear veranda, the removal of a staircase from kitchen, the closing off of a doorway between the two small bedrooms on the second floor, and possibly the removal of a cupola. Post-1961 changes include installation of built-in window seats in the first and second floor bay windows, added closets, the addition of ceiling molding in various rooms, the levels off of floors in living room with plywood, replacing of dining room ceiling, breaking through back wall of second floor closet, and replacing the rear veranda columns and the front veranda balusters.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Isaac Young House is significant in the area of architecture as an outstanding example of a Second Empire style house in the town of New Castle. Built c. 1872, it is elegant without being ostentatious and has details that are appropriate for a house of that style in a non-urban setting. Although the home is not a highly ornate building, it exhibits good construction and the level of craftsmanship is high. Three generations of Youngs lived in this house, starting with Isaac Young, a farmer, and ending as professionals commuting to New York City. They lived off their 36 acres first as farmers and later through real-estate sales, whittling down that 36 acres to just under 6 when they finally sold the house and remaining property in 1961. Today, the home retains a high level of architectural integrity.
DescriptionThe Isaac Young House, built c. 1872, is located on a 5.763-acre property in a rural, yet residential, area of New Castle. It is situated at the apex of a hill with a generous lawn and a circular driveway. The home is a three-story Second Empire style house with Italianate details. It is four bays wide with two wraparound verandas on the first floor. It is asymmetrical in shape and design. A stone and brick foundation support the wooden clapboarded structure. The mansard roof is tiled with hexagonally shaped slate. Several architectural oddities suggest that the house was built onto or around a pre-existing structure - probably a simpler and smaller vernacular farmhouse. Many alterations have been done on the house yet it stills retains a high level of architectural integrity. Also on the property is a frame barn and attached shed. For details on the Isaac Young House refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyOld Chappaqua Historic District
MunicipalityNew Castle
CommunityBanksville
Street Number
Street AddressQuaker Road

Historic District NameOld Chappaqua Historic District
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status? Yes  07/14/77
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner Various
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architectunknown
Builderunknown
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, DetailsQuaker Meeting House: barns
Architectural StyleColonial Vernacular
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Detailsreligious; outbuilding
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Detailsreligious; agricultural
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date MovedThorne-Dodge House, 1852
Year Builtc.1753-1852
Structural SystemWood Frame, Interlocking Joints
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsAll the buildings in the district have been altered or enlarged over time starting with a west wing for the meeting house c. 1778-1780. The Thorn-Dodge house was moved to its present site in 1852; a rear wing was added to the Reynolds-Carpenter house in 1850 and both the Stony Hollow house and the Thorn-Dodge house are enlargements of smaller earlier structures.
Date of Alterationsc. 18th-19th centuries

SignificanceThe Old Chappequa Historic District is an important remnant of the 18th-19th century Quaker farming communities which were established at several points within Westchester County. The centerpiece of this community was and is the meeting house important not only for its longivity (built 1753, enlarged 1778-1780 and 1961) but for the fact that it was here that soldiers wounded at the Battle of White Plains were brought for treatment.
DescriptionThe Old Chappaqua Historic District is composed of a contigious group of 18th-19th century homes clustered about a Quaker Meeting House along Quaker Road in the town of New Castle. Originally called, Shapequaw, the area was settled by Quakers around 1730. The earliest of the historic district buildings, the meeting house, was built in 1753. The other key buildings within the district are dwellings: the Reynolds-Carpenter house; the Sutton-Reynolds house; the Samuel Allen farm comprising the main house (c. 1830) a tenant house (c. 1850) and a currying shop (c. 1820); the Stoney Hollow house (c. 1820); the Thorn-Dodge house and the Thomas-Dodge house (1852). There are also three early 19th century barns within the district. All the buildings are of wood-frame sheathed with clapboard or shingles. For further information see the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyRehoboth - Horace Greeley Related Site
MunicipalityNew Castle
CommunityBanksville
Street Number33
Street AddressAldridge Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  04/19/79
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerLoretta L. Robbins
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectH.Greeley; Ralph Adams Cram (conversion)
Builderunknown
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseBarn
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1856;1891conversion
Structural SystemConcrete
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsThe original poured concrete barn of 1856 was converted in 1891-1892 to a Neo-Gothic style residence. The original three story layout was reduced to two, steped gables and dormers were added and the interior of the 40 x 50' structure was divided into areas for living and intertaining with with a plethora of Victorian Gothic detail. In 1954 the Gothic influence was toned down by removal of the dormers and steped gables. However, the interior remains largely unchanged.
Date of Alterations1891-1892; 1954

SignificanceThough later converted to a residence, Rehoboth was originally a barn, and its significance resides in the fact that it was, as far as known, the first poured concrete barn built in this country as well as one of the very first concrete structures of any sort. Moreover, Greeley's interior design was revolutionary. Building the structure into a hillside, he designed it to have three floors; an upper chamber for hay storage; a middle one for the cattle and a lower level from which waste could be removed. Though now common, this labor saving arrangement was a major agricultural innovation.
DescriptionIn 1856 Horace Greeley designed and directed the building on his Chappequa farm of a unique barn; of poured concrete and on three levels (hay storage, cattle stalls and waste disposal) it was a model of labor saving efficiency soon copied throughout the country. However, after Greeley's death in 1872, interest in the family farm declined; and in 1892 his daughter, Gabrielle, had the barn converted to a home. The architect, Charles Adams Cram designed a Neo-Gothic pile with peaked roof, lancet windows and steped gables. This remained until 1954 when new owners restored the original roof line and removed the dormers. The interior, with its Gothic details, remains substantially the same with an elaborate entrance hall and curving staircase opening off of which is a large ballroom-like living room with massive brick fireplace.


PropertyWilliams-Dubois House
MunicipalityNew Castle
Community
Street Number35
Street AddressPinesbridge Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  04/06/89
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/25/89
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  04/06/89
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
BuilderArthur Williams
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsFarmhouse
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1780
Structural SystemTimber Frame
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe one-story porch was removed in 1940. The chimney on the west wall has been modified. Metal suspension rods in the attic support the ceiling below. The original wooden tie beams have been removed and one metal tie beam has been inserted. The fireplace in the front room (now a sitting room) has new brickwork and is no longer in a diagonal configuration. The rear room is currently used as a kitchen and has been updated.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Williams-DuBois House is architecturally significant as a rare surviving example of a substantially intact eighteenth-century vernacular residence in northern Westchester County. Representative of a Revolutionary War era residential building type once commonly found in the mid and lower Hudson Valley, it is characterized by one-and-one-half story, five-bay, rectangular massing, end wall chimneys and gambrel roof, center hall, four-over-four interior floor plan, and restrained Federal style detail and ornamentation. A derivative of settlement period Georgian design idioms, the type was most popular between 1760 and 1820. The Williams-DuBois House is the only known surviving example of its type in the town of New Castle and one of only a handful preserved in this densely built-up area of southeastern New York.
DescriptionThe Williams-DuBois House, a circa 1780 dwelling, is located on a three-acre parcel at the junction of Pinesbridge Road, a pre-Revolutionary War period thoroughfare, and Grace Lane. It is in a rural setting with other residential homes nearby. There are three non-contributing buildings on the property. The home is a regional vernacular farmhouse with Federal period details. One-and-one-half stories high, the residence is a rectangular block, five bays wide and three bays deep. The heavy timber frame building, which is sheathed in clapboard, is capped by a wood shingled gambrel roof, and rests on a fieldstone foundation. Two brick endwall chimneys are exposed at the first level only. The one-story porch was removed c. 1940. The rear elevation of the home is sheathed in wood shingles rather than clapboard and is three bays wide. The interior, a center hall plan two rooms deep, is characterized by exposed heavy timber framing, wide original floorboards, original working fireplaces, and restraining early Federal woodwork. Below the first floor of the house is a full basement that features hand-hewn columns supporting the main beam and the original diagonal chimneys. There have been no major additions to the building and exterior facades are essentially intact except for the fenestration on the rear elevation. The interior of the house retains substantial historic fabric. For more details on the Williams-DuBois House refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


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