George F. Bailey, Somers

Photograph by Gray Williams

Historic Properties Listing

PropertyFirst Reformed Church of Mount Vernon
MunicipalityMount Vernon
Community
Street Number137
Street AddressSouth Fifth Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  10/31/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerReformed Church of America
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectMr. J. Jardine
Builder
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionFair
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1870-72
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe First Reformed Church of Mount Vernon is significant for its history and architecture. The church and associated buildings are visible evidence of the historical presence of the Reformed Church congregation in the community and the county, and of the nearly simultaneous establishment and growth of the congregation and community, the church having been incorporated on November 26, 1853, and the village of Mount Vernon seventeen days later on December 13, 1853. As the Reformed Dutch Church, the congregation was the first organized religious body in Mount Vernon. The present church is located directly across the street from where the original church stood. It is an example of the English Gothic Revival style of the parish church type, with a characteristic square tower, intact roof cresting and a miniature rear gable bellcote. The church is the only Westchester County building known to have been designed by the New York City architectural firm of Jardine and Jardine.
DescriptionThe First Reformed Church of Mount Vernon (1872) is an English Gothic Revival style church located on South Fifth Avenue. It is bordered on the south side by a wide lawn and on the north side by residential buildings. It was designed by the architectural firm of Jardine and Jardine. The church is a stone (rough-dressed Tuckahoe marble) structure with a slate-covered gable roof. It is three bays wide and seven buttressed bays deep. The windows consist of stained, grisaille, and art glass. The sanctuary windows, installed c. 1910, were designed and executed by the Henry Birkenstock Studio of Mount Vernon. There is also a square engaged bell tower with a pyramidal roof. The interior of the church is notable for the original black walnut woodwork, including the exposed decorative roof framing. At the rear of the site are the educational building, opened as a chapel in 1893, and the 1896 parsonage; both are covered with asbestos shingles and have gable slate roofs.


PropertyFirst United Methodist Church (Chester Hill Methodist Church)
MunicipalityMount Vernon
Community
Street Number227
Street AddressE. Lincoln Ave.

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  10/04/99
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  01/07/00
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  10/04/99
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectGeorge W. Kramer
Builder
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsLate Victorian: Romanesque Revival
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1900-01
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsThe stained glass oculus in the ceiling was recently restored.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe First United Methodist Church (originally the Chester Hill Methodist Episcopal Church) is an architecturally significant example of Romanesque Revival ecclesiastical architecture of the late Victorian period. Designed by the well-known church architect George W. Kramer and built in 1900-01, the church is a handsome and spacious example of the "Akron Plan," a liturgical form particularly favored by the Methodist Church during this period, and a form often credited to Kramer. The addition of the Sunday school wing in 1935 had little impact on the original building, which has seen few other changes over the years and maintains most of its original fabric. Two relatively small but active congregations presently use the facility, and the building remains a focal point of activity in a vibrant, ethnically, and racially mixed community.
DescriptionThe First United Methodist Church, a Romanesque Revival church built in 1900-01, sits on a spacious plot with a 204-foot frontage on East Lincoln Avenue. Along the Summit Street side is a large parking lot and lawn. At the very top of a long six-block hill, "Chester Hill," the church is a focal point of the surrounding neighborhood. The focus is emphasized by an 85-foot bell and clock tower. The surrounding neighborhood is residential. The church building is rectangular in plan, with two stories on a high basement. The exterior of the original structure is granite with limestone details and a red slate roof with intersecting gables. The attached Sunday school wing has a flat roof and the main elevation of that wing is granite to match the original church structure, and stucco on the side and rear elevations. The multi-gabled roof of the church includes an eight-sided, conical entrance tower, which marks the entrance and narthex at the corner of East Lincoln Avenue and Summit Street. The auditorium is lit by two large, double-height, round-arched windows that contain stained lass in geometric patterns. Most of the remaining windows on the original building are double-hung and also contain geometric stained glass. The classroom wing has steel casement windows. On the interior, the auditorium is characterized by a semi-circular, amphitheater-like seating plan. A balcony wraps around the back of the space and the magnificent domed ceiling is lit by a 14-foot stained glass oculus. Full height sliding panels separate the auditorium from the adjacent, double height Sunday school chapel to the west; these panels are not presently operable, but they once allowed the two spaces to be united into a single, large chamber. To the west of the Sunday school chapel lies the Sunday school addition, which contains three large classrooms on the upper floor and a double height gymnasium or multipurpose room at the basement and first floor levels. The remainder of the basement contains a kitchen, several meeting rooms, and utility spaces. The roof structure over the church and Sunday school chapel is constructed of timber-framed scissor trusses with intermediate roof rafters.


PropertyJohn Stevens House
MunicipalityMount Vernon
Community
Street Number29
Street AddressWest 4th Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  02/26/72
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerCity of Mount Vernon
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionFair
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1851
Structural SystemTimber Frame
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsThe four interior end chimneys were rebuilt ca. 1955, and the original roof shingles have been replaced with metal sheathing. The house was fully restored in 2001.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceOne of the earliest dwellings erected in the area, the Stevens House was the home of John Stevens, founder of Mount Vernon. It served as the political and social nucleus for an early working class suburban community, and is now one of the few remaining landmarks in the municipality. For many years after Stevens’ death, the home was occupied by his descendents. Today, the City of Mount Vernon owns the property.
DescriptionOriginally built to face the Old Mile Square Road from Hunt's Bridge to the Old Post Road in Eastchester Village, the Stevens House antedated the regular street plan drawn for the settlement of Mount Vernon in 1851. Situated cornerwise on its lot, the house is a good example of a substantial, frame farm dwelling of the mid-19th century. Standing two and a half stories in height on a raised basement, the structure measures five bays in width on the southwest elevation, and three bays on the northwest. Rectangular in shape with a small projecting rectangular entrance porch on the northwest façade, the clapboarded house has a wooden frame with queen post trusses supporting the gable roof. A one-story porch, incorporating six fluted Doric columns and a dentiled cornice that matches the cornice above, extends the length of the southwest elevation. The central feature of the southwest elevations consists of an entrance door with rectangular transom and sidelights and, above, a window framed by pilasters and a dentiled cornice. The four interior end chimneys were rebuilt ca. 1955, and the original roof shingles have been replaced with metal sheathing. Distinctive features of the interior include two marble mantels, a number of the original wooden mantels, much of the original plank flooring, shouldered architrave trim with a rinceau pattern throughout the first floor.


PropertyMount Vernon Post Office
MunicipalityMount Vernon
Community
Street Number15
Street AddressSouth First Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  05/11/89
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/11/89
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  05/11/89
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerUnited States Postal Service
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectOscar Wenderoth
Builder
Building TypeGovernment
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleNeo-Classic
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseGovernment
Current Use, Details
Original UseGovernment
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1915-17
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsSeveral alterations were made to the building at the time of the 1936 additions, including the installation of two additional entrance doors on the principal façade. Also, the ceiling of the workroom has been dropped approximately twelve feet from its original height.
Date of Alterations1936

SignificanceThe Mount Vernon Post Office is architecturally significant as an outstanding example of an early-twentieth century public building in New York State. Built between 1915 and 1917, the monumental building is an important example of the Neoclassical style, the most popular style used to convey the democratic principals of the federal government. The building was one of the last post offices built in New York State before the designs for such buildings were standardized in 1915. The siting and design of the Mount Vernon Post Office were influenced by the planned nature of much of the city, as the building is located near the railroad station and across the street from the earlier Neoclassical style public library. The Mount Vernon Post Office retains a high degree of integrity on the exterior and interior. Side wings were added in 1935 and are of the same materials and design as the original block.
DescriptionThe Mount Vernon Post Office is located on the east side of South First Avenue near the intersection of East First Street in the downtown commercial area of the city. There are numerous single-family residences surrounding the structure as well. The post office was constructed in 1915 in the Neoclassical style, with wings added in 1936 in the same style. The symmetrically composed facades are clad with smooth-faced coursed limestone. The building is two stories in height at the front and three stories in height at the rear and is rectangular in plan. The principal façade on South First Street has a five-bay-wide central pavilion flanked by slightly recessed one-bay wings and deeply recessed two-bay wings. The entrance is reached by a wide set of stone steps with bronze railings. Exterior stairs lead to an employee entrance at the front of the north addition. The rear façade, which is three stories in height, has a projecting central section with a covered mailing platform at the sub-basement level and a large rectangular tripartite window at the first floor level. The rectangular main lobby is mostly intact. It has a high coffered plaster ceiling and terrazzo and marble floors. Buff-colored marble wainscoting surrounds the room and the large interior door openings at either end have frames of the same material. Above the wainscot are flat engaged pilasters with plainly molded capitals. The screenline along the inner wall has teller openings between the pilasters and large metal-framed windows above.


PropertySt. Paul's Church
MunicipalityMount Vernon
CommunityEastchester
Street Number897
Street AddressColumbus Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  10/15/66
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerNational Park Service
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleColonial
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsChurch, cemetery, museum
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood; Fair
NeighborhoodCommercial
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1765
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsChancel at rear added c. 1850s. Tower of belfry changed in 1890s. Interior completely restored in 1942 to original colonial appearance - pews are not original, gallery is, as is the Erben organ of c. 1830.
Date of AlterationsVarious

SignificanceSt. Paul’s Church is significant for its history, both on a county and national level. In 1643, Anne Hutchinson and her family were massacred by the Indians on the land where the church stands. St. Paul’s Church was founded in 1665 and was situated on the Green in front of where the present Church stands. It was declared by Congress in 1943 to be a National Site of the Bill of Rights. The Great Election of 1733 was held on St. Paul’s’ Village Green. The injustice of this election caused John Peter Zenger, a German printer, to write an account on the election in the New York Journal, which led to his arrest and trial. During the Revolutionary War, St. Paul’s served as a hospital for British and Hessian soldiers. The bell that is in the tower is the "twin sister" to the famed Liberty Bell in Philadelphia; both bells were cast at the Whitechapel Foundry in London. The graveyard contains over 6,000 burials with the earliest grave from 1704. Many notable Westchester families are buried there.
DescriptionSt. Paul's Church, erected between 1765 and 1787, is an excellent example of a typical smaller parish church designed in the simpler Georgian Colonial style. The original church was founded in 1665 in the newly-established settlement of Eastchester. The existing church, erected in 1765 to replace the older wooden church, is constructed of fieldstone and brick. A notable feature on the exterior is the bell in the tower, which is the twin of the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia. The church was seriously damaged when utilized by Hessian troops as a hospital and barracks during the Revolutionary War. The building was then repaired and further enlarged in 1787. In 1849 the rectory is built of stone on the site of the original church. St. Paul's Church was restored faithfully to its 1787 appearance in 1942 as the result of work by a committee of eminent citizens headed by Sara Delano Roosevelt. The adjoining cemetery contains 6,000 burials dating from 1704.


PropertyTrinity Episcopal Church
MunicipalityMount Vernon
Community
Street Number335
Street AddressFourth Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  08/25/97
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  09/01/98
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  08/25/97
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectHenry Dudley
Builder
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1857-59
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsDormers were added to the roof in the 1880s. The interior was redecorated in the 1880s and 1930s. The parish halls were also added on to the church - the first in 1892 and the second in 1909. In 1954, the second parish hall suffered a fire in which everything but the exterior stonewalls was destroyed. These walls were preserved and incorporated into the lower stage of a new auditorium.
Date of AlterationsVarious years

SignificanceTrinity Episcopal Church (1857-59) is significant as a representative, intact, example of Gothic Revival religious architecture in the English parish style and as a work of Henry Dudley, a well-known English architect. In Trinity, Dudley accurately employed materials, structure, color, form, and function typical of the Gothic mode. Dudley’s design utilized the specific characteristics of the English parish church type, such as a steeply pitched gable roof, buttresses, articulation of separate parts, lancet windows and stone masonry construction. Architecturally, the Trinity Episcopal Church complex retains a high level of integrity of design, location, setting, feeling, association, materials, and craftsmanship. The substantially intact complex is an outstanding collection of cultural resources and this acts as an important local landmark. Historically, Trinity Episcopal Church has been an integral part of the religious community of Mount Vernon since 1857.
DescriptionTrinity Episcopal Church is located two blocks west of the Mount Vernon business district in an urban neighborhood of mixed residential and commercial structures. The property is .96 acre. The complex includes four features. Three of them, the church (1859), old parish hall (1892), and new parish hall (1909; 1954) are attached, forming a L-shaped building. The fourth feature, the rectory (1893), is a detached building at the northeast corner of the site. The church was constructed in 1857-59 in the Gothic Revival style and enlarged and redecorated in the 1880s. It is a single-story masonry structure under a steep pitched roof. The building is composed of a rectangular nave, front entrance narthex, rear chancel, sanctuary, and sacristy. Built of granite in a random ashlar pattern, the church sits on a stone foundation and is surmounted by its original red and yellow slate roof. A series of small steeply pitched dormers were added to the roof in the 1880s. The primary features of the church are its axial plan, clearly articulated functional divisions, stone construction, slate roof, lancet-arched openings, buttresses, stained-glass windows, and wooden exterior doors with iron hardware. The rectory is a two and one-half story wood-frame residence, now covered in perma-brick. It is square in plan and has a steep pyramidal roof. Over-sized pyramidal dormers break the roof. As a whole, the church complex retains a high level of integrity of design and materials. Despite numerous changes, the church still clearly recalls the medieval Gothic style that inspired its original design. For more information on Trinity Episcopal Church refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


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