Romer-Van Tassel Homestead, Elmsford

Photograph by Gray Williams

Historic Properties Listing

PropertyDutch Reformed (Sleepy Hollow) Church and Cemetery
MunicipalityMount Pleasant
CommunitySleepy Hollow
Street Number
Street AddressRoute 9

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  10/15/66
National Historic Landmark Status? Yes  
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerReformed Church of the Tarrytowns
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
BuilderFrederick Philipse
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleColonial Dutch
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
Neighborhood
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1697
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsThe first significant changes in the church occurred during the Revolutionary era when the special pews of the Lords of the Manor were removed and the plain oak tenant benches in the church were also replaced with high-back, soft pine pews. In 1837, in the course of repairing fire damage, more fundamental alterations were made. These included the removal of the original door from the south to the west wall, changing of the old high-silled windows into low Gothic pointed arch windows, the removal of the heavy beams from the interior, removal of the old north gallery, enlargement of the west gallery, and the replacement of the original pulpit. Prior to the bicentennial observance in 1897, a partial restoration of the interior was undertaken. This consisted mainly of reproducing the original beams, quartered oak ceiling, and the pulpit. This restoration corrected much of the 1837 alteration.
Date of Alterations1837, c. 1897

SignificanceThe Dutch Reformed Church of Sleepy Hollow is a distinguished relic of Dutch America, notable for its architectural and historical associations with colonial life on the Hudson. As the social and religious center of public life on the Manor of Philipsburg the church provided a common meeting ground for landed proprietors and tenants, thereby helping to weld the manor into an effective economic and political unit of Dutch provincial society. While the exact date of the building’s construction is not certain, architectural authorities are unanimous in dating it from the closing years of the 17th century. A rectangular stone structure, with a three-sided rear apse and a gambrel roof with an octagonal belfry, the Sleepy Hollow Church is located on Route 9 on the northern outskirts of North Tarrytown. Owned and administered by the First Reformed Church of Tarrytown, the church is used only on special occasions.
DescriptionConstructed between 1697 and 1702, the Dutch Reformed Church at Sleepy Hollow is an excellent example of a typical Dutch Colonial octagonal-shaped church that also incorporates some 19th century alterations. Built by Frederick and Catherine Philipse of Philipsburg Manor, the one-story Sleepy Hollow church is nearly rectangular in plan. Its high rubble-stone walls have a barn-like severity, and they are pierced by a door and six large windows framed in brick and shaped to a pointed arch- the result of a remodeling in 1837. The octagonal roof is a typical Flemish gambrel, shaped like a flared bell with curving sides. The roof is topped by an open octagonal belfry surmounted by a wrought-iron weathervane. The interior is very plain and is arrange so that all eyes focused on the pulpit, which was located opposite the door. The interior is barren of decoration and is somewhat bleak in character. However, the charm of much of the original design remains and the church is maintained in excellent condition.


PropertyEdward Harden Mansion
MunicipalityMount Pleasant
CommunitySleepy Hollow
Street Number200
Street AddressNorth Broadway

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  12/04/03
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  01/31/04
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  12/04/03
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerUnion Free School District of The Tarrytowns
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectHunt and Hunt
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGeorgian Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseEducation
Current Use, DetailsAdministration Building
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1909
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe building has been converted from a home into office, with the drawing room/living room serving as the board of education meeting room.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Edward Harden Mansion, now the administration building for the Union Free School District of the Tarrytowns, is an outstanding example of Georgian Revival residential architecture in Westchester County. Designed by the well-known firm of Hunt and Hunt and built in 1909 for a Wall Street financier, the imposing residence exhibits the hallmarks of its style, including its brick construction, symmetrical composition, hipped roof with dormers, and classically inspired ornamentation in wood and marble. In 1911, the first Montessori school in America was started in the Harden Mansion, with the Harden children among its first students. Although the property on which the house was originally sited has been changed through the construction of a school and playground, the house itself retains a high degree of integrity of location, design, materials, craftsmanship, feeling, and association, continuing to recall the lifestyle of the wealthy in Westchester County in the early 20th century. The Edward Harden Masion is one of the few surviving great houses along Broadway in the villages of Tarrytown and Sleepy Hollow.
DescriptionThe Edward Harden Mansion, a large Georgian Revival former residence built in 1909, is located in the village of Sleepy Hollow, on the northern border of the village of Tarrytown, on the east side of U.S. Route 9, the main thoroughfare through the Hudson River towns. The home was once surrounded by great estates, many of which are no longer extant. The building is a two-and-one-half story red brick residence, with a low marble-clad foundation, symmetrical seven-bay façade, slate-covered hipped roof with dormers and prominent chimneys, modillioned cornice, marble trim, two-story wood enclosed porches flanking the main section, and a one-story rear service wing. One the interior, one enters a formal hall, with a staircase brought from an 18th century house in Boston. Original marble/wood/plaster fireplace mantels, plaster ceiling, wall and fireplace detailing and original black walnut woodwork remain throughout the house. The Montessori school was located in the second floor south conservatory/sun parlor. The frame carriage house is one-and-one-half stories in height, with a clipped gable roof, deep-bracketed eaves, a small cupola, and a variety of window sash. For more details on the Edward Harden Mansion refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyHammond House
MunicipalityMount Pleasant
CommunityArdsleyMamaroneck
Street Number
Street AddressGrasslands Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/06/80
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerFrederick and Michael Rock
Institutional OwnerTribes Hill
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
BuilderWilliam Hammond
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsFarmhouse
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsCultural
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionFair
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1719
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsIn 1926, the Westchester County Historical Society (former owners) repaired and stabilized the neglected and deteriorated building. It is currently being restored by the current owners.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe well-preserved Hammond House is a historically significant, early 18th century farmhouse. William Hammond built the house about 1719 on land he leased from the Philipsburg Manor. The surviving farmhouse is believed to be one of only two extant Philipsburg tenant dwellings; originally two hundred such structures dotted the vast manor. Hammond was active in local community affairs and his son James achieved military prominence during the American Revolutionary War.
DescriptionThe Hammond House is located on Grasslands Road in Valhalla. The house is visible from the nearby road and situated on a flat, partially wooded lot in an undeveloped rural landscape. Clapboard covers the five-bay, one and one half story house and its two wings. All three sections have asphalt shingle gable roofs. Interior brick chimneys piece the center of the original house (middle) and the ends of the east and west wings. The house's central gable roof slopes out to form the five-bay front porch. The original wood front door is paneled, divided, and has wrought-iron hardwood and a glaze transom above. The one-story, two-bay west wing was a small detached cottage that was moved and joined to the house in 1835. The cottage addition became the house’s kitchen wing, and a small shed roof porch covers its separate entrance. In 1860 the two-bay, one and one half story east wing was added to the house. Inside, the walls on the first floor are plaster. The two wood-paneled walls in the parlor are 18th century but the date of their installation is unknown. The wide-board flooring and several wood doors are original. Large fireplaces are found in the parlor, old kitchen, and kitchen wing.


PropertyJames House
MunicipalityMount Pleasant
CommunitySleepy Hollow
Street Number
Street AddressPhelps Memorial Hospital Center (Route 9)

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  08/02/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerPhelps Memorial Hospital Center
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectJohn Butler Snook
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleItalianate
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseMixed Use
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1850
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsMinor exterior and interior alterations took place on the house.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe James House, built about 1850, is architecturally significant as an outstanding example of an Italianate style mansion. Designed by John Butler Snook of the New York City architectural firm of Trench and Snook for the New York City copper magnate Anson Green Phelps II, the residence is distinguished by a finely crafted granite and brownstone exterior, exceptionally elaborate interior detailing and a dramatic setting with expansive views overlooking the Hudson River. No historic support building survive, but the approximately 14-acre property includes specimen trees, an historic fieldstone retaining wall, and informal landscaping features typical of the picturesque taste.
DescriptionThe James House is located off Route 9 on the grounds of the Phelps Memorial Hospital Center in Sleepy Hollow. Designed by John Butler Snook of the New York City firm of Trench and Snook, the James House is a two-story, cubic Italian Villa style building with Renaissance-inspired design features. Constructed of load-bearing, roughly hewn granite with smooth-faced brownstone accents, the building rests on a slightly raised stone foundation surrounded by a random course fieldstone retaining wall. The building is five bays wide and three bays deep and is encircled by a one-story flat-roofed verandah with a decorative wrought-iron frieze supported by ornate wrought-iron columns. The building is surmounted by a low-pitched hipped roof with broadly projected eaves. A prominent centrally located cupola surmounts the roof. The interior of the James House, predominantly classical in character, survives substantially intact. The large, room-like center hall is flanked by formal sitting, living, and dining rooms and a stair hall. The entrance hall features lofty, twelve-foot-high ceilings, plaster walls with paneled wooden wainscoting and handsome black and white marble flooring. For details on the James House refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyJohn A. Hartford House
MunicipalityMount Pleasant
CommunityArdsleyMamaroneck
Street Number
Street AddressWestchester Community College, Grasslands Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  12/27/77
National Historic Landmark Status? Yes  
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerWestchester Community College
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleTudor Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseEducation
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodCollege Campus
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1932
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsSome modern lighting fixtures have been installed in the structure.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe John A. Hartford House is significant for its association with owner John A. Hartford, merchandising genius of the Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company (AandP), the first nationwide chain-store company. Although Hartford purchased this property in 1930 and completed the house in 1932, just after he had passed the midpoint of an already successful career with AandP, the site is related significantly to both his pre-1930 and post-1930 accomplishments. It was his principal place of residence after 1932, and became symbolic of both the Hartford family's long-held and unusually intense penchant for privacy and the tremendous economic success for the chain-store idea in both the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
DescriptionThe John A. Hartford House is an irregularly shaped, 2 1/2-story, hip-and-gable roofed, Tudor style, fieldstone mansion of approximately 30 rooms. It is situated near the center of a wooded, hilly, 370-acre tract that once formed party of the Hartford estate but now makes up the campus of Westchester Community College. The north-facing Hartford House displays an external façade of coursed brown fieldstone broken by irregularly placed brown-painted timbers and a combination of rectangular and rounded window openings. Crowning the edifice is a red tiled roof, above which rise five large, multiflued, corbelled, red brick chimneys. Several hipped dormers adorn both front and rear roof slopes and the entire mass rests on a stone foundation. There is a partial basement. A single-story porte-cochere extends from the west end of the main block, while a two-story wing angles eastward from the opposite end. The front entrance, which is approachable via a circular drive, consists of a rather simple, wooden, rounded, double door situated under radiating stone voussiors in the center of the north façade. Inside, the house displays a beautiful array of oak, walnut, and poplar paneling and other woodwork; embossed plaster ceilings; and original brass chandeliers and marble-walled baths. All original fireplaces and mantles are in place, as are the hidden storage cabinets situated in the walls of the main first-floor corridor and all paneled rooms. The house is virtually unaltered and is in excellent condition. For more information on the John A. Hartford House refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyJohn D. Rockefeller Estate
MunicipalityMount Pleasant
Community
Street Number
Street AddressPocantico Hills

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/11/76
National Historic Landmark Status? Yes  
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerJohn D. III, Nelson A., Laurance S., and David Rockefeller
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectDelano and Aldrich, William Welles Bosworth
Builder
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsForest, Secondary Structure, Single Dwelling
Architectural StyleColonial Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsForest, Secondary Structure, Museum
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsForest, Secondary Structure, Single Dwelling
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1893-1937
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThink what you will of the man and his methods, John Davison Rockefeller was responsible for epochal accomplishments in American industry, finance, and philanthropy. He grew wealthy in post-Civil War America by controlling the nation’s oil industry, and when he retired as president of Standard Oil in 1896, he was considered the world’s richest man. Rockefeller devoted his retirement years to worthy causes, focusing on institutions that advanced knowledge and human welfare. From 1893 until his death in 1937, Kykuit (from the Dutch for "lookout") in the Pocantico Hills was his primary residence. Considering the means of its builder, the mansion was far less ostentatious than those built by other barons of the Gilded Age. Rockefeller’s son Nelson willed Kykuit to the National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1979, and it is now open to the public (Information taken from http://www.nr.nps.gov/).
DescriptionThe John D. Rockefeller Sr., Estate, located 25 miles north of New York City, comprises a total of about 3,400 acres and is known as Pocantico, or sometimes, Pocantico Hills. At its peak, the estate covered almost 3,500 acres -- some six square miles of property -- and was described as a self-contained world, with its resident workforce of security guards, gardeners and laborers, and its own farming, cattle and food supplies. It has a nine-hole, reversible golf course, and had a total, at one time, of seventy-five houses and seventy private roads, most of them designed by Rockefeller Senior and his son. Within the Park is Kykuit, Rockefeller’s home, which rises come 500 feet above the nearby Hudson and which offers magnificent views of the Tappan Zee and the surrounding country. The Classical Revival Georgian mansion took six years to complete and was refurbished some years after initial construction, being finally completed in its present form in 1913. It is six-stories, with a mansard roof, and has two basement floors, with many interconnecting underground passageways and service delivery tunnels. On the main floor are a music room, lounge room, library, dining room, reception room, office and small pantry. On the floors above are bedrooms, storerooms, and staff quarters. It features interiors designed by Ogden Codman, Jr., collections of Chinese and European ceramics, fine furnishings and 20th century art. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1976. Today, there are around ten Rockefeller families who live within the estate, both in the fenced-in park area and beyond. Much area over the decades has been given over to New York State, such as the Rockefeller State Park Preserve, and is open to the public for horse riding, bike trails and running tracks. For detailed information on the estate, including Kykuit and its outbuildings, refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society. (Information taken from)


PropertyPhilipsburg Manor
MunicipalityMount Pleasant
CommunitySleepy Hollow
Street Number381
Street AddressBellwood Avenue @ Route 9

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  10/15/66
National Historic Landmark Status? Yes  
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerHistoric Hudson Valley
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsDutch-English Manor
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsMuseum
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1680-1697
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificancePhilipsburg Manor once covered an area of some 90,000 acres and represented an important holding of a Dutch-English family before the War of Rebellion. After the war, it became much like any other farm along the Hudson, with no grater importance than the others had. Today, as it has been carefully studied and restored, the manor of the Philipse family is an excellent illustration of a working Dutch-English manor at the height of its importance, 1730-1740. A cluster of buildings around the stone manor house; barn, grist mill and outbuildings, represents the focal point of vast holdings of manorial lands, with its tenant farmers, slaves, fields of grain, orchards, stands of timber, and stone quarries. It was also the focal point of the sizeable trading and smuggling activities of a prominent colonial family for over two generations. As more and more land came under cultivation, the mill and manor house became more and more important, not only for the exporting of grain or for the production and export of meal, but also for the baking of ship's bread for both New York and overseas, and as a staging point for the export or domestic shipping of local produce and the importation of foreign goods.
DescriptionInformation from the National Register Information System (http://www.nr.nps.gov): Frederick Philipse, associate of Peter Stuyve-sant, came to the New World as official "carpenter" of the Dutch West Indies Company and founded an estate that eventually included some 90,000 acres. In the 1680s, at about the time he built Philipse Manor Hall downstream on the Hudson, he built a portion of this stone house, Philipsburg Manor, and a mill. By 1749 the house had doubled in size, and it was further enlarged after the Revolution, under new ownership. In 1951, thanks to John D. Rockefeller's philanthropy, the property was purchased, subsequently restored, and is now open to the public. Philipsburg is interpreted as an illustration of a working Dutch-English manor at the height of its importance, ca. 1730-1740.


PropertyPhilipse Manor Railroad Station
MunicipalityMount Pleasant
CommunitySleepy Hollow
Street Number
Street AddressRiverside Drive

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/18/91
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  03/14/91
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  01/18/91
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerMetropolitan Transportation Authority
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsTransportation
Architectural StyleTudor Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseEducation
Current Use, Details
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsTransportation
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1910
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe Philipse Manor Railroad Station has undergone many alterations in recent years.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Philipse Manor Railroad Station is architecturally and historically significant as a highly intact example of a Tudor Revival style suburban commuter railroad station. Constructed circa 1910, the building’s long, low massing, hipped roof and deep loggias reflect a long-standing tradition in railroad station design. The building’s rusticated stone masonry, rich decorative woodwork, and stucco and half-timber sheathing recall the pseudo-Medieval inspirations that influenced American architecture during the early Twentieth century. The station also exhibits a high degree of craftsmanship in the treatment of its exterior and interior masonry and finely paneled finishes, enhancing the building’s architectural distinction. The railroad station was built specifically to serve a new housing development in North Tarrytown, reflecting the broad movement toward suburbanization in lower Westchester County at the time of its construction.
DescriptionThe Philipse Manor Railroad Station is located on a high bluff overlooking the Hudson River in Sleepy Hollow. The c. 1910 railroad station is located east of the railroad tracks that pass between the station and the river. The building is a low, one-story, rectangular, hip-roofed building constructed of rock-faced granite block, with stone, stucco and wooden trim. Because the station was built into the bluff, access to the tracks was through the building’s basement, the western wall of which is exposed at trackside. Centered in the basement wall are three large round-arched openings. Throughout the building the block was pointed with tan beaded joints. The station consists of an elongated octagon with a hipped roof that extends over open loggias across the east and west sides. The principal feature of the interior is the octagonal waiting room. Its east wall is dominated by a large fireplace of rock-faced granite with a hearth laid with red tile pavers. Original decorative cast iron radiators are located to each side of the fireplace. Interior walls and beamed ceiling are sheathed in stained and varnished oak matchboards, with applied wider boards simulating paneling. For more information on the Philipse Manor Railroad Station refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyPokahoe (Fremont House)
MunicipalityMount Pleasant
CommunitySleepy Hollow
Street Number7
Street AddressPokahoe Drive

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  10/20/89
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerDr. Jacquelin A. MacNaughton
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
BuilderJames Watson Webb
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1850
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsIn the 1950s the roof was lowered and the interior was completely modernized.
Date of Alterations1950s

SignificanceConstructed c. 1850 by James Watson Webb, diplomat and journalist, who owned the New York Morning Courier and Inquirer and as Ambassador Extraordinary to Brazil negotiated the withdrawal of the French from Mexico in 1867. The property was also owned at one time by Ambrose C. Kingsland, a mayor of New York. Primary historical significance, however, is derived from the site's association with General John Charles Fremont, "The Pathfinder," who with his wife Jessie Benton Fremont owned Pokahoe from 1865 to 1872. Fremont, with Kit Carson as his guide, led pioneers to the west coast along a route that became known as the Oregon Trail; he later served as the governor of California and the first (unsuccessful) Republican candidate for president of the United States. The property originally contained a large three-story house but in the 1950s the top two stories were removed. As a result the house is no longer architecturally significant.
DescriptionPokahoe is located in Sleepy hollow in the section called "Sleepy Hollow Manor." The property is about 3.7 acres bounded on the south by Pokahoe Drive, on the north by a storm runoff between the property and two other properties, on the east by Hemlock Drive, and on the west by MetroNorth and the Hudson River. The property originally contained a large Gothic Revival three-story house constructed of site-quarried granite. In the 1950s the top two stories were removed and the interior completely modernized. Enough remains, however, including the basic configuration, finely crafted stonework, and main Gothic-arched entrance, to provide evidence of the strong original character of the building.


PropertyTaconic State Parkway
MunicipalityMount Pleasant
CommunityArdsleyMamaroneck
Street Number
Street AddressFrom Kensico Dam Plaza, North to I-90 Interchange

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  06/15/04
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  12/23/05
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/15/04
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectGilmore Clarke
Builder
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsTransportation
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsTransportation
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsTransportation
Structural ConditionGood
Neighborhood
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1923 - 1963
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Taconic State Parkway is significant in the areas of recreation, transportation, and regional planning for its association with the history of the New York State park and parkway system. The parkway was widely regarded as a landmark in parkway design and was frequently presented as a model for divided highway development in general. An influential 1963 treatise on American landscape development present it as "the ultimate harmony of man and natures" and proclaimed it "undoubtedly the most beautiful and dramatic" freeway in the United States.
DescriptionThe Taconic State Parkway, constructed between 1923 and 1963, is a limited-access scenic pleasure drive located in the southeastern quadrant of New York State. The parkway follows a north-south path approximately midway between the Hudson River and NY 22, extending 105.3 miles from the Kensico Dam Plaza in Westchester County to its northern terminus at the Berkshire Spur of the New York State Thruway in Columbia County. The major landscapes along its route include hills and valleys, creating a constant rise and fall in elevation along the parkway. As originally built, the southernmost sections featured narrow rights-of-way and tight curves. In several places, original parkway segments that once carried both north and southbound lanes now carry only one-way traffic. Parkway bridges encompass a wide range of structural types that include various materials, including steel, concrete, and stone. The original parkway drives were constructed of reinforced concrete slabs until the late 1950s, when asphaltic concrete was used. Asphalt surfacing, due to reconstruction projects, overlays the original concrete in Westchester. The parkway originally features seven service stations and five overlook rest areas; today only two service stations and four overlook areas remain. The original guardrail system was removed in the early 1960s. Four state parks are linked by the parkway. For more details on the Taconic State Parkway refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyTarrytown Lighthouse
MunicipalityMount Pleasant
CommunitySleepy Hollow
Street Number
Street AddressKingsland Point

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/29/79
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerWestchester County Department of Parks, Recreation and Conservation
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsTransportation
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsMuseum
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsTransportation, Water-Related
Structural ConditionFair
NeighborhoodRecreational
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1883
Structural SystemMetal
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsThe original heating system was replaced in the 1950s. Electricity was added in 1947. The plumbing was also updated. The light was deactivated in 1961. Periodically the riprap was secured and the boat landing was repaired or replaced. A pedestrian walkway was added in the early 1970s and a small footbridge was constructed in 1975.
Date of AlterationsVarious years

SignificanceThe Tarrytown Lighthouse was constructed between 1882 and 1883. It is the only conical steel structure in the thematic group to have living quarters. It was also the only family station in the lower Hudson and the only lighthouse located in Westchester County. It was built to mark a dangerous area off the Tarrytown shoals at a time when river commerce was at its peak. The preservation as a local landmark has been ensured since it has become part of Kingsland Point Park.
DescriptionThe Tarrytown Lighthouse is located on the eastern shore of the Hudson River. It is to the north of the Tappan Zee Bridge and south of Kingsland Point recreation area. It is a steel conical tower with five stories, a cellar and a lantern deck set on a stone pier. The structure is painted white, the lantern room is black and the pier is red. The tower has eight windows, eight portholes and a glazed lantern room. The entrance to the building is on the first floor. A covered catwalk, its roof supported by simple cast-iron columns, encircles this level of the structure. There are two walkways located at the top of the tower. The first floor served as the living area. The second and third floors had one bedroom. The fourth level was divided between a bedroom and a workshop. A ladder led to the watch room on the fifth level where the fog bell mechanisms were located. The floor of the lantern room, above this level, has round glass insets to allow light to filter down to the watch room. Another walkway surrounds the lantern room, bound by a decorative iron railing.


PropertyUnion Church of Pocantico Hills
MunicipalityMount Pleasant
Community
Street Number555
Street AddressBedford Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  03/21/02
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  06/20/02
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  03/21/02
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerNational Trust for Historic Preservation
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectLudwig W. Eisinger
Builder
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1921-22
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe only major alteration of the church itself has been the replacement of the original leaded, opalescent glass windows with stained glass created by Matisse and Chagall and given to the church by the children of Abbey Aldrich Rockefeller and John D. Rockefeller, Jr.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Union Church of Pocantico Hills is significant for its collection of stained glass windows by the great modern artists, Henri Matisse and Marc Chagall. The church is also significant for its architecture. Designed by architect Ludwig W. Eisinger and built in 1921-22, the building is essentially intact, almost textbook-perfect example of the early 20th century Neo-Gothic style of ecclesiastical architecture. The parish hall (1930-31) and Sunday school classroom wing (1957) respect the original design to the extent that they appear to be an integral part of the church rather than later additions. The only major alteration of the church itself has been the replacement of the original leaded, opalescent glass windows with stained glass created by Matisse and Chagall and given to the church by the children of Abbey Aldrich Rockefeller and John D. Rockefeller, Jr. The rose window, which was completed in 1954 and installed in the church in 1956, is the last completed work of Matisse. Matisse, who was too infirm to travel, relied on architects’ drawings and photographs in designing his window. The nine windows by Chagall were created and installed between 1964 and 1966. Chagall visited the church to study the space and the light before accepting the commission and returned twice more for the installation and dedication of his windows. The church was intended to be and to appear to be a small village church. The setting of the church has changed little since it was built; it is still surrounded by small houses, woodlands, and open land.
DescriptionThe Union Church of Pocantico Hills is a Neo-Gothic stone church that was built as a Protestant community church in 1921-22. It is located in the hamlet of Pocantico Hills in the Town of Mount Pleasant. At one time, the Rockefeller family owned Pocantico Hills. The church was built on land given to the congregation by John D. Rockefeller, Sr. There is a landscaped parking area and lawn at the southern and western ends of the property. The church and manse are virtually intact to their times of construction, with the exception of the two additions (a parish hall in 1930-1 and a Sunday school wing in 1957) to the church and the replacement of most of the original stained-glass windows by windows designed by renowned artists Henri Matisse and Marc Chagall. The church is a one-story rectangular building with a fieldstone foundation and walls; the high-pitched gable roof is slate-shingled. The main entrance with its Gothic-arched wood doors is at the northwestern corner of the building on the north wall with a similar entrance porch and bell tower at the northeastern end. There is a fieldstone chimney. The exterior architectural style is severe in its simplicity and the one distinctive decorative elements are the large metal-work clock face on the bell tower and the iron strap hinges and nail studs on the doors. In the bell tower is a set of four bells that play Westminster chimes. The interior of the church contains wainscoting, Gothic-arched beams, choir pews, a wood screen, and an organ. The manse is Tudor Revival in style and two stories high in height, with a stuccoed first story, shingled second story, high pitched hip roof clad with slate, and metal casement windows. On the ground floor there is a central hall with a dining room, kitchen, living room, and a sunroom. On the second floor are bedrooms and bathrooms.


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