MM, Amawalk

Photograph by Gray Williams

Historic Properties Listing

PropertySt. Mark's Cemetery and Methodist Cemetery
MunicipalityMount Kisco
CommunityMount Kisco
Street Number
Street AddressEast Main St., Corner of St. Mark's Place

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  05/02/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  06/23/88
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  05/02/88
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerVillage/Town of Mount Kisco
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
BuilderThomas Brown, et al.
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsCemetery
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsN/A
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsCemetery
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsCemetery
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodCommercial
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1761 - 1911
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe east wall was rebuilt in 1959 with mortar, and the intermittent south wall has fallen in places. The north wall was rebuilt in the original manner between 1984 and 1985.
Date of Alterations1959, 1984-5

SignificanceSt. Mark's Cemetery is historically significant as a reflection of the history of North Castle Hamlet/New Castle Corners, a small rural community in the lower Hudson Valley. Its historical development occurred in three stages between 1761 and c. 1911, as the cemetery served as a burial ground for two religious denominations, Revolutionary War soldiers and local citizens. The religious history of this community, demographic data, and genealogical information can be derived from that data inscribed on the grave markers. The cemetery is also significant for its association with the American Revolution, as it served as a temporary army hospital during the nearby Battle of White Plains. In addition, the cemetery is significant for the high artistic value of its funerary art. The cemetery contains an unusually large collection of elaborately carved and decorated grave markers, some the work of local and regional master carvers. These markers range in date from 1773 and c. 1940, with the majority dating from the cemetery’s 1773-1911 period of significance. They include examples of the full range of late eighteenth century and nineteenth century types, including red sandstone markers with cherub heads, Neoclassical urn and willow types, marble sandstone and marble markers with Gothic and Victorian inspired forms and decorations, marble obelisks and plain granite markers.
DescriptionSt. Mark's Cemetery is located in the southern part of the Village/Town of Mount Kisco on New York State Highway #117 (East Main Street) and is situated in a low-density commercial area. It is on the southwest corner of East Main Street and St. Mark’s Place. The cemetery is rectangular in shape and measures 287 feet in depth and 94 feet in width (approximately one-and-one-third acres). The perimeter of the cemetery is defined by stonewalls at north, east, and south sides and sporadically located spruce trees at the west side. The walls were originally constructed in 1819 in a dry, rubble manner. The east wall was rebuilt in 1959 with mortar, and the intermittent south wall has fallen in places. The north wall was rebuilt in the original manner between 1984 and 1985. There are stone gateposts in two locations: on the north wall in the Methodist Episcopal section of the cemetery and the other between the two sections. There are three clearly discernable sections in the cemetery: the earliest from 1761, an 1851 piece of land, and the Methodist parcel that was added in 1854. The gravestones are made of red sandstone and marble and have many motifs and symbols. For further information on St. Mark's Cemetery and the gravestones refer to the files at the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertySt. Mark's Episcopal Church
MunicipalityMount Kisco
CommunityMount Kisco
Street Number
Street AddressNorth Bedford Road and East Main Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  10/11/91
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  11/21/91
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  10/11/91
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerSt. Mark's Episcopal Church
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectBertram Grosvenor Goodhue
Builder
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1910
Structural SystemMetal
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsGoodhue added the tower and vestibule in 1921. In 1928 the parish house was added to the northwest side of the church and the south aisle was added. In 1954 the parish house was remodeled to accommodate classrooms.
Date of Alterations1921, 1928, 1954

SignificanceSt. Mark's Episcopal Church in Mount Kisco is significant as an intact representative example of small ecclesiastical design by Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue, one of the most important church architects active in America during the first decades of the twentieth century. The building exemplifies Goodhue's desire to built churches in a Gothic mode that would reflect the medieval style, but that still meet the demands of modern life. Goodhue worked with many well-known artists in the building of the church, which allowed every detail to contribute to the creation of a single unified work. St. Mark's is also significant in the development of Mount Kisco. St. Mark's is a prominent, centrally located landmark and the construction of the church reflects the growth of Mount Kisco in the early twentieth century as wealthy people from New York City settled in the community and purchased second homes in the area.
DescriptionSt. Mark’s Episcopal Church (1910) of Mount Kisco is located on the east side of the intersection of North Bedford Road (Route 117) and East Main Street (Route 133). It is in a mixed-use neighborhood and is on a 2.5-acre property. The church is a two-story Neo-Gothic style building constructed of square cut local granite and schist accented by carved limestone trim and copings. Its various steeply sloping, intersecting gable roof surfaces are of green and purple slate shingle. In plan, the church is laid out in typical cruciform arrangement with a nave, side aisles, crossing chancel, a side chapel, entrance porches, and a bell tower. Offices and the Rector’s study form a simply designed link from the main forms of the church to the forty by one-hundred-forty foot parish hall addition (1928), which originally contained a lower level gymnasium that was converted to basement church school rooms and a sub-basement storage area in 1954. The interior of the church consists of white plaster walls, contrasting with a dark stone floor and a dark exposed timber ceiling of trussed oak beams, purlins, and paneling. There is extensive carving designed by Goodhue, and stained glass and mosaics, which are presumed to be by Tiffany. Also on site are a concrete block garage and a Columbarium. For a detailed description of the church refer to the files at the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyThe Woodpile
MunicipalityMount Kisco
CommunityMount Kisco
Street Number
Street AddressCroton Point Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/03/92
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  02/10/92
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  02/10/92
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerPrivate
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectA.J. Davis, Addison Hutton
Builder
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsSingle dwelling, fields, outbuildings, landscape
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsSecond Empire, Italian Villa, Gothic Revival
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsSingle dwelling, fields, outbuildings, landscape
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsSingle dwelling, fields, outbuildings, landscape
Structural Condition
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1847, 1856, 1870
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Woodpile exemplifies the theme of mid-nineteenth century romanticized country living as it was affected through landscape architecture and architecture. The district is defined historically by its association with the Wood family, who settled in this location as early as 1809. The three residences within the district, formerly owned by the three Wood brothers, are all fine examples of residential architecture of the period and exemplify those styles associated with the picturesque landscape tradition. Brambleworth, c. 1847, the earliest residence in the district, is a classic example of Gothic Revival design by A.J. Davis. Evergreen Lawn, c. 1856, exemplifies the Italianate idiom, while Braewold, built in 1870 of the site of the original Wood family farmhouse, is in the Second Empire style. The district has been preserved in the same context since the period of significance and is a prime example of country living in Westchester County.
DescriptionThe Woodpile is located in the town of Bedford, approximately a mile and a half north of the village of Mount Kisco on Croton Lake Road. It is a historic landscape district of three adjacent properties on the east side of Croton Lake Road and a designed landscape consisting of their immediate settings and the expansive view that they share into a contained pastoral landscape to the west. The district boundary includes 122 acres. There are fields, trees, a pond, and a cottage (known as the Locust Brook Cottage, c. 1769). Overlooking the bucolic scenes are three residences built by the three Wood brothers in the middle of the nineteenth century. Each house, with its integral landscape, represents the style of the decade in which it was built. The oldest residence, known as Brambleworth, is a stone Gothic Revival cottage designed by A.J. Davis and completed in 1847. It has steep slate roofs, brick chimneys, arches, and narrow casement windows. The second residence, Evergreen Lawn, is a cream-colored stuccoed brick building in the Italianate style. This two-and-one-half story home has a low-pitched gable roof and windows that are double hung with shutters painted dark green. It originally had fifteen rooms. The third residence is a two-story stone Second Empire style building designed by Addison Hutton and built in 1870. This residence is known as Braewold and it separated by the other two homes by Wood Road. The home has rusticated random ashlar stonework on the ground floor with green Pennsylvania slate facing the mansard and a metal top roof. For more details on the Woodpile and its contributing buildings, see the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyTown/Village Hall and Post Office
MunicipalityMount Kisco
CommunityMount Kisco
Street Number100-120
Street AddressMain Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/06/97
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  03/01/97
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  01/06/97
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerVillage/Town of Mount Kisco
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectMott B. Schmidt
Builder
Building TypeGovernment
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleColonial Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseGovernment
Current Use, Details
Original UseGovernment
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1932-36
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Town/Village Hall and Post Office of Mount Kisco is historically and architecturally significant as a distinguished collection of early twentieth century civic architecture. The Mount Kisco municipal building, which opened on December 3, 1932, is one of Westchester County’s finest examples of Colonial Revival design. Also located on the property is the 1936 United States Post Office. The regionally prominent architect, Mott B. Schmidt, designed both buildings. These buildings exemplify in scale, proportions, and detail the neo-classical movement of the early twentieth century. Although a number of original departments and services have been forced to seek more space outside of the historic buildings, the majority of Mount Kisco’s municipal services continue to be housed within the complex. The complex, with its aesthetically appealing buildings, park like setting, and prominent location is an important local landmark as a community center, serving the social, governmental, and educational needs of Mount Kisco.
DescriptionThe Town/Village Hall and Post Office of Mount Kisco are located in the geographic center of Mount Kisco. The property is bounded on the north by the intersection of East Main Street and Brookside Avenue, on the south by Blackby Place, on the east by East Main Street, and on the west by the Branch Brook. The centerpiece of the complex is the Town and Village Hall (1932). The two-story cruciform plan building is oriented north with its primary façade facing an open grassy lawn. Built of brick, laid in a Flemish bond, the building rests on a cut limestone foundation and is covered by a central slate shingle clad hipped roof with slate single clad gable roofs extending from the east, west, and north elevations of the building. Surmounting the central roof is a clock tower that is covered by a copper roof. There is a two-story portico on the main façade. The east and west elevations of the building are identical and are dominated by a two-story, three bay projection. The gable of the projection features a full pediment and centered within the pediment is an oculus. The interior of the hall remains intact. The floors are marble. A second building in the listing is the Mount Kisco Post Office (1936), a one and one-half story building constructed of brick laid in Flemish bond with a limestone foundation and slate shingles. The interior of the post office is intact. The main entrance opens into a vestibule. The main hall contains a barrel-vaulted ceiling and arched openings with wrought grills surmount the windows and teller screen. Also of note is the interior oil on canvas murals by Thomas Donnelly (completed in 1936), which depict scenes from the early history of Mount Kisco. Also on the site are a one-story brick library and a war memorial, both of which are non-contributing. For more details on the Town/Village Hall and the Post Office at Mount Kisco, see the files at the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyUnited Methodist Church
MunicipalityMount Kisco
CommunityMount Kisco
Street Number300
Street AddressMain Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  11/04/82
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  09/30/82
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerUnited Methodist Church
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectJ. King
BuilderEdward Dauchey
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1868
Structural SystemWood Frame, Interlocking Joints
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsIn 1892 the choir loft was built in front of the sanctuary to accommodate the newly acquired Jardenne and Sons pipe organ. In 1902, a decorative stamped-metal ceiling replaced the original ornate plaster ceiling and moldings. In 1916, the choir loft was enlarged in the same style as the original. Twelve memorial stained-glass windows were installed in the tower, the balcony, and the narthex in 1918. A chapel was built in the church’s full basement in 1941. Extensive redecoration was completed in 1966-67. New lighting was installed and a new central pulpit was designed. New oak pews replaced the original mahogany pews.
Date of AlterationsVarious years

SignificanceThe United Methodist Church in Mount Kisco is an excellent example of Carpenter Gothic church architecture. Built in 1868, the elaborately detailed church is also significant for its association with the spread of Methodism in the region during the era of evangelical protestantism. The history of the church reflects the area’s mid-century period of growth. By the mid-1960s, the congregation had exceeded the former church’s capacity and as a result, this structure was built by the prominent local building Edward Dauchey. The cornerstone of the building had been laid during the centennial year of Methodism in America, 1866 and during the last decades of the nineteenth century it was often referred to as the Centenary Methodist Episcopalian Church. As membership continued to increase, the church underwent additions to accommodate the needs of the growing and changing population. Today, the church remains a local point of the community.
DescriptionThe United Methodist Church is situated on the northwest corner of the intersection of Main Street and Smith Avenue in a commercial and residential neighborhood south of Mount Kisco’s central business district. The Victorian-style parsonage, located right behind the church on Smith Avenue, is also a part of the property. The two-acre property is landscaped with open lawns, walkways, shrubbery, and mature trees. The Carpenter Gothic church, built in 1868, has a gable roof covered with slate shingles. The east façade is dominated by two towers of unequal height. The larger tower, a 42-foot-tall wood bell tower, is topped by a 40-foot-tall aluminum steeple. A five-foot cross crowns the steeple. The front façade is covered with one-half-inch plywood board and batten siding. There are three decorative entrance porches on the east façade. The north and south elevations are six bays wide with large double stained lancet windows. The side and rear elevations have been covered with aluminum siding, which replicate the original wooden sash. Through the main entrance is the narthex, from which the original mahogany staircase leads to the balcony. The nave of the church has a central aisle, two side aisles, and two sections of pews. The pulpit is centrally located at the front of the sanctuary; the choir loft is located behind the pulpit. The interior of the church has undergone many alterations, which are listed in the alteration section. For a detailed description of the United Methodist Church see the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


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