Van Cortlandt Manor Ferry House, Croton

Photograph by Gray Williams

Historic Properties Listing

PropertyAlbert E. and Emily Wilson House
MunicipalityMamaroneck
CommunityMamaroneck
Street Number617
Street AddressBrook Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  05/24/06
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectAlbert E. Wilson
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleColonial Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1949-51
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsIn 1953, an office for Mr. Wilson was added to the west end of the house.
Date of Alterations1953

SignificanceThe Albert E. and Emily Wilson House is significant as an unusual and intact example of Colonial Revival residential architecture in Westchester County. Designed by local architect Albert E. Wilson in 1949 and completed in 1951 as a retirement home for the architect and his wide, the modestly scaled brick residence recalls earlier Georgian Revival commissions of Wilson and the prominent firm of Peabody, Wilson, and Brown. It has the formal, central plan and attention to detail of the earlier commissions, but reflects more modern architectural trends with its stripped details, picture windows, one-story plan, and attached garage. The house is virtually intact from its date of construction.
DescriptionThe Albert E. and Emily Wilson House is located on the south side of Brook Street between Beach and Barry Avenues in the Village of Mamaroneck. The house is virtually intact on the exterior and interior from its original date of construction in 1949-51 and the date of the construction of the office wing in 1953. The house is one-story in height with a low-pitched gable roof and is U-shaped, with a central section and flanking pavilions forming a front courtyard. Surfaced with red brick and topped by a gray slate roof, the building is simply massed and detailed. Some of the brick was painted with a light wash to create a mottled effect. The central entry is slightly recessed into the façade, creating a porch defined by stylized brick quoins. The entry door itself consists of a simple Dutch-type spilt door with a glazed upper pane. The interior of the house is simply finished, with relatively low plaster ceilings, plaster walls, and simple woodwork. Doors are all hollow core, smooth-surfaced wood. For more information on the Albert E. and Emily Wilson House refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyLarchmont Post Office
MunicipalityMamaroneck
CommunityLarchmont
Street Number1
Street AddressChatsworth Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  05/11/89
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/11/89
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  05/11/89
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerUnited States Postal Service
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectWilliam Dewey Foster
Builder
Building TypeGovernment
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleColonial Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseGovernment
Current Use, Details
Original UseGovernment
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1937-8
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe three counters now in use occupy the space of four original counters, but when the screen was altered it was redesigned from original elements. A short concrete wheelchair ramp has been added to the north side of the portico in an area which was originally a paved sidewalk.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Larchmont Post Office is architecturally significant as an intact representative example of the federal architecture erected as part of the public works projects initiated by the United States government during the Great Depression of the 1930s. The building was designed in a refined Colonial Revival style, illustrating the tendency toward the use of simplified Federal, Georgian, and Greek Revival-inspired forms and decoration which had become popular for federal buildings in the early twentieth century. The Larchmont Post Office, designed and built in 1937-8, is the work of William Dewey Foster, a consulting architect to the Office of the Supervising Architect of the Treasury, who designed at least ten port offices in the New York metropolitan area between 1934 and 1942. Foster was one of a number of architects in private practice who were recruited by the federal government to design post offices during the greatly expanded public buildings program of the 1930s. The Larchmont Post Office exhibits the characteristics that typify post office design of the 1930s including a symmetrical principal façade with central entrance, steel frame and masonry construction with brick facades, simple decoration in limestone and brick, multi-paned window sash, a standardized floor plan with public lobby at the front and general high quality of construction.
DescriptionThe Larchmont Post Office is located at 1 Chatsworth Avenue at the northeast corner of Boston Post Road in Larchmont. The building is sited on a fairly large grassy plot in a neighborhood of single-family residences and small commercial shops. On the south side of the building is an ornamental iron fence. The structure is a symmetrical, seven-bay-wide, one-story structure with a portico of limestone flanked by areas of red brick limestone trim. It has a flat roof, which is higher in the central section. The centrally placed entrance has modern double doors but retains a fixed eight-light transom. The original interior is almost entirely intact. The public lobby is entered through a vestibule. It is constructed of wood and has original wood interior doors with brass hardware. A red granite wainscot runs around the lobby. There are three large ornamental rosettes in the plaster ceiling; two of these are obscured by florescent lights. The floors are gray terrazzo with narrow brass joints. The original screen line is mostly intact. The three counters now in use occupy the space of four original counters, but when the screen was altered it was redesigned from original elements. For a detailed description of the Larchmont Post Office refer to the files at the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyMamaroneck Methodist Church
MunicipalityMamaroneck
CommunityMamaroneck
Street Number546
Street AddressBoston Post Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  03/31/92
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  10/02/92
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  03/31/92
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerMamaroneck Methodist Church
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectMr. Carreja
BuilderSolomon Gedney
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, DetailsColonial Revival
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to BuildingDevelopers
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1859
Structural SystemWood Frame, Interlocking Joints
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsA two-story cross gable addition was added in 1869. A choir loft was added in 1913. In 1927 a one-story kitchen wing was added and in 1957 a glass walkway was also added to connect with the school building.
Date of Alterations1869; 1913; 1927; 1957

SignificanceThe Mamaroneck Methodist Church is significant as an intact and distinctive example of Gothic Revival style ecclesiastical architecture, a rare example of this type in Westchester County. Designed by a Mr. Carreja of New York, the church was built in 1859 by local builder and shipwright, Solomon Gedney. Many of the names associated with the church are those of people significant to Mamaroneck’s history.
DescriptionThe Mamaroneck Methodist Church is located on the north side of the Boston Post Road in the Village of Mamaroneck. It is located on the block between the intersections of Dubois Avenue on the west and Beach Avenue on the east. The building is in a mixed-use neighborhood. The church, built in 1859, is a one-story, Gothic Revival style building of wood frame construction. The gable-roofed building is surfaced with vertical boarding and rests on a stone foundation capped by a sharply molded strong course. The church is distinguished by a single, central tower, engaged for half its depth into the front gable end of the church. There are stained glass windows, a spire, and wood lancet arches on the exterior. The 1869 rear, cross gable addition is two stories tall, and projects on either side, slightly beyond the nave. The entry foyer of the church is simple square in plan with a pair of doors on each side leading to small hallways to the nave and choir loft. The interior of the nave has wide wainscot up to about five feet, and the walls above this are covered in smooth plaster. Two side aisles serve to separate the three distinct sections of the roof. The majority of the pews appear to be, if not original, at least very early in the church’s history. The pews are painted cream and have a stylized Gothic arch motif. The choir loft dates from a 1913 renovation. A parsonage, built in the Colonial Revival style in 1898, is also present on the property. For a detailed description of the church and the parsonage refer to the files at the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyMamaroneck Post Office
MunicipalityMamaroneck
Community51
Street Number309
Street AddressMount Pleasant Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  05/11/89
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/11/89
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  05/11/89
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building Type
Building Type, Details
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current Use
Current Use, Details
Original Use
Original Use, Details
Structural Condition
Neighborhood
Threats to Building
Site Integrity
Date Moved
Year Built
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

Significance
Description


PropertySkinny House
MunicipalityMamaroneck
CommunityMamaroneck
Street Number175
Street AddressGrand Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  03/06/91
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerIda Santangelo
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectNathan Seely
BuilderNathan Seely
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsVacant
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionFair
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1932
Structural SystemOther (describe)
Structural System, DetailsTwo railroad ties serve as beams in the cellar.
Photograph Available?Yes
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Skinny House is architecturally significant as a symbol of American ingenuity and craftsmanship. Built by Nathan Seely, a black contractor, using salvaged materials and a resourceful design, on a very narrow parcel donated by an Italian neighbor, it represents both black enterprise and good neighborliness. Seely designed and constructed his family’s new home maximizing its utility by building a basement, two stories, and an attic. He also devised numerous built-ins and windows for natural lighting to give the impression of more interior space. The home is the narrowest home in the Village of Mamaroneck. Its professional construction and ingenious design are a testimony to the dedication of a prominent black contractor to build a solid, functional, and delightful home for his family in Westchester.
DescriptionThe Skinny House in Mamaroneck is a two-story, ten foot wide by 39 foot long, hip roofed, wood shingled home built by contractor Nathan Seely in 1932. It is set on a twelve and one-half by one hundred foot property. The house is located on its original site in a residential neighborhood known as Washingtonville. As it sets 27 feet tall and is positioned approximately 20 feet back from the modern set back line on which the surrounding homes are built, it is visible from Interstate 95. The Skinny House is sheathed in red brown wood shingles unifying the facades that are punctuated with a variety of windows and doors, which are trimmed in white painted wood. The man hip roof, first floor gable roof with a modified dormer, and entry gable roofs are of asphalt shingles. There are cables on the sides of the home to anchor it to the ground. The foundation is made of different types of irregularly shaped stones and bricks. Two railroad tier serving as beams run through the cellar. The sewer pope is supported by finished marble. The house was heated with coal stoves on each floor. Floor grates allow heat to rise to the bedrooms. In the cellar there remains one original pot-bellied stove, coal shute and pails. One brick chimney on the west side of the house supports all of the stoves. The interior is finely finished with plaster and hardwood floors and moldings and woodwork throughout. For more details on the Skinny House see the files at the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertySt. Thomas' Episcopal Church Complex
MunicipalityMamaroneck
CommunityMamaroneck
Street Number168
Street AddressWest Boston Post Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  03/06/03
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  10/20/03
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  03/06/03
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerSt. Thomas' Episcopal Church
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectBassett Jones
Builder
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1884-1925
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe St. Thomas' Episcopal Church Complex is a distinctive example of eclectic Victorian ecclesiastical architecture in Westchester County. The three original church buildings, the Church, the Parish House and the Endowment Building, are individually excellent and unique examples of their styles in the village of Mamaroneck, as is the Tudor Revival Heathcote Hall. Additionally, they form the only intact, contiguous, surviving collection of late-nineteenth-century architecture in the village. The complex, moreover, is both an important local landmark and has close associations with individuals important in the history of both the village of Mamaroneck and of Westchester County. Since its founding, St. Thomas Parish has served as an important community organization in the Village of Mamaroneck.
DescriptionThe St. Thomas’ Episcopal Church Complex, a group of four buildings built between 1884 and 1925, is located on a sloping lot in the South Shore village of Mamaroneck. Commercial and residential buildings, Boston Post Road, and the Mamaroneck Harbor surround it. The land is well-landscaped and is outlined by original bluestone retaining walls. The church, with a stylized narthex-and-transept plan, is constructed entirely of rough-dressed Belleville brownstone with smooth brownstone trim and has multiple red slate gable roof planes. Three bays wide and six bays deep, the building has Gothic windows arranged singly or in pairs and oculi in all gables. Buttresses of rough and smooth stone divide bays and terminated all facades. The main entrance porch incorporates a deeply recessed double wood door with highly decorative wrought iron hardware within a pointed arch surround. The interior of the church is virtually intact since its construction, with stained oak woodwork (including nave and chancel pews), wainscoting, exposed roof framing with trusses, and window and door surrounds. Mosaic tile floors in all areas and the marble baptismal font and altar are also original. Most of the stained glass windows, figural and geometric in a Medieval English style, also appear to be original. Also part of the property are the Parish House/Chapel, the Endowment Building, and Heathcote Hall. For a detailed description of the four buildings refer to the files at the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyWalter's Hot Dog Stand
MunicipalityMamaroneck
CommunityMamaroneck
Street Number937
Street AddressPalmer Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  06/21/91
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerEugene Warrington
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeCommercial
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsChinese Pagoda
Current UseCommercial
Current Use, Details
Original UseCommercial
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1928
Structural SystemWood Frame, Light Members
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsPermanent windows were put in and the shed was added to the back of the building in the 1970s.
Date of Alterations1970s

SignificanceWalter’s Hot Dog Stand is a specific type of commercial establishment that evolved as a response to the coming of the automobile. It is a Chinese pagoda-style roadside stand that has been in continuous use since 1928, selling the original product, owned and operated by the original family, the Warrington’s. The design of Walter's underscores the inventiveness of commercial establishments seeking to lure automobile traffic in the first decades. Walter’s remains one of the few establishments of commercial vernacular architecture that had such a profound impact upon the American landscape in Westchester County.
DescriptionWalter's Restaurant was constructed in 1928. It was well located from two vantage points: Mamaroneck High School across the street and Palmer Avenue, on which it stands. It is a single story building with a cellar and a large attic. The foundation is of concrete block. The exterior façade is largely stucco with the exception of the front area beneath the three stainless steel bays where it is black tile. Below the hipped, oxidized copper roof is a decorative wooden dentil frieze. The south side features a driveway flanked by a grassy area with picnic tables. The west side is four bays wide and has two hipped formers with newer six over six windows. Between the dormers is a common brick chimney. In the rear are a shed and a cider press, operated seasonally from 1928 through the 1940s. The roof is very distinctive being made of copper and formed to look like tile in pagoda style. The hips of the roof curve up and display Chinese type lanterns except for the rear where they are missing. The roof has an 18" copper crest that runs along its ridge. The crest displays copper molded carp at either end. The color of the roof is green due to oxidation; however, despite their copper content, the hips, crest, and carp are a silver color.


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