Bedford Court House, Bedford

Photograph by Gray Williams

Historic Properties Listing

PropertyBridge L-158
MunicipalityLewisboro
CommunityGoldens Bridge
Street Number
Street Address.1 Mile South of Route 138

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  11/29/78
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerCity of New York, Dept. of Water Supply
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
BuilderClarke, Reeves, and Company
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsBridge
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsVacant
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsBridge
Structural ConditionGood
Neighborhood
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityMoved
Date Moved1904
Year Built1883
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsWhen the bridge was moved, the width was reduced from 29 feet to 16 feet.
Date of Alterations1904

SignificanceBridge L-158 is the only known double-intersection Whipple truss railroad bridge surviving in New York State. Built in 1883 and moved to its present site in 1904, Bridge L-158 successively carried the main line of the New York, West Shore and Buffalo, and the New York and Mahopac Branch until its abandonment about 1960. Technologically significant for the prefabricated iron "Phoenix columns" which form its compression members, Bridge L-158 is a rare survivor reflecting this important development in the bridge-building technology of the nineteenth century. The association of its patented truss design with pioneer bridge engineer Squire Whipple of New York further contributes to the significance of this structure.
DescriptionBridge L-158 is situated on the abandoned right-of-way of the New York and Mahopac Branch, New York Central and Hudson River Railroad. Built in 1883 as the shortest of three spans carrying the New York, West Shore, and Buffalo Railroad across Rondout Creek south of Kingston, New York, this double-intersection Whipple through truss bridge was moved to its present location in 1904. At that time the bridge was reduced from its original double-track width of twenty-nine feet to its present single-track width of sixteen feet. Each truss is 163 feet long and consists of nine panels of equal length: the web measures thirty-two feet in depth. The entire bridge stands twelve feet above water level on a substructure consisting of identical concrete and abutments. For a detailed description of Bridge L-158 refer to the files at the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyMead Memorial Chapel
MunicipalityLewisboro
CommunityScarborough
Street Number2
Street AddressChapel Road @ Mead Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  10/04/99
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  11/30/99
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  10/04/99
Eligible for National Register?

Owner The Mead Family
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectHobart B. Upjohn
BuilderWilliam J. Daniel
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
Neighborhood
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1905-07
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Mead Memorial Chapel is significant in the area of architecture as an outstanding example of late Gothic Revival religious architecture in Westchester County. Designed by Hobart B. Upjohn and built in 1905-07, the stone building exhibits the hallmarks of the Gothic Revival style based on early English Gothic precedents, including its stone construction, prominent squat tower, heavy buttresses, pointed arch windows and doors, and simple interior with brick floors, wainscoting, a trussed ceiling, and leaded glass windows. An addition of 1929, also designed by Upjohn and in the same style, contributes to the significance of the building. The building retains a high degree of integrity of location, setting, design, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association. It stands in a serene rural setting overlooking the Long Pond Nature Preserve, Lake Waccabuc and the former farmlands that belonged to the family who built it. One of the last remaining churches still owned privately in Westchester County, it is an example of a country church in the English Gothic style designed by a renowned architect.
DescriptionThe Mead Memorial Chapel, a late Gothic Revival stone church built in 1905-07, stands on a slight rise at the corner of Mead Street and Chapel Road in the hamlet of Waccabuc. The chapel is virtually intact on the exterior and interior. The chapel is rectangular in plan, with a wing, added in 1929, on the west side and a small gable on the east side for the vestry room. All the roofs are of slate. The foundation and walls are of cut stone. A bell tower pierced by Gothic arch shaped louvered windows in the top course and lancet shaped glazed windows in the middle course, forms the front of the church. There are buttresses on the exterior. The wide stoop of stone and brick with low stone walls at each side stands in front of the double wooden entrance doors. The stained glass windows in the apse are protected by hardware cloth on the outside. The interior rectangular nave has a brick floor, with dark stained vertical oak wainscoting up to the level of the windows, capped by horizontal molding. Above the wainscoting the walls are white stucco. The ceiling is trussed with heavy oak timber the same color as the wainscoting. A wrought iron chandelier in the shape of a wheel is suspended from the ceiling. The furniture for the congregation consists of two groups of 32 chairs with a center aisle. The chairs are stained oak with rush seats and shaped backs, each one holding a wooden kneeling bench for the person behind. A limestone baptismal font with brass bowl stands in the left corner. Two stone steps lead up into the chancel that is framed by a Gothic arch. The alter table is of carved oak. Three stained glass windows decorate the chancel. At the right of the chancel sits the Hammond organ and behind the organ a small vestry room with one window and a door leading to the outside. For more information on the Mead Memorial Chapel refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyOsborn-Bouton-Mead House
MunicipalityLewisboro
CommunitySouth Salem
Street Number399
Street AddressPoundridge Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  08/19/04
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  11/24/04
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  08/19/04
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerJanice F. and William T. Strauss
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleColonial
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1734
Structural SystemOther (describe)
Structural System, DetailsHeavy Frame
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe floor was dirt until the late 20th century when a concrete floor was created. Bathrooms and the kitchen have been modernized. A shed dormer was created in the 1930s. The chimney was restored from the attic floor up in 1973. A well, a modern electrical service, and basic repairs were added to the home in 1976. The house underwent a complete restoration c. 1977.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Osborn-Bouton-Mead House is significant in the area of architecture as a rare surviving example of an early-18th century New England saltbox-type frame residence in Westchester County. Built c. 1734, just after the area known as the "Oblong" was traded by Connecticut to New York, the house exhibits the hallmark characteristics of Colonial period farmhouses built in western Connecticut and the very eastern parts of New York, including its symmetrical composition, two-story saltbox form, central chimney, and interior plan organized around the central chimney with paneled chimney breasts in the parlors and a large cooking fireplace in the rear kitchen. For more details on the significance of the home refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.
DescriptionThe Osborn-Bouton-Mead House is an 18th-century Connecticut-style saltbox located on approximately 2.6 acres of land on the east side of New York State Route 124 in the town of Lewisboro. The house is of heavy frame construction and two-and-one-half stories in height, with clapboard siding, a high-pitched gable roof parallel to the façade and a large central brick chimney. It has a five-bay symmetrical façade with a central entrance. The door surround, with its pilasters and molded lintel, and the six-panel door are of the period though not original to the house. The foundation is loose stone, and the floor was dirt until the late 20th century when a concrete floor was created. The house retains most of its original features: floors, paneling, hardware, fireplaces and chimney through the second floor, and even much of its original plaster. Also on the property are a former milk house and two garages. For more information on the Osborn-Bouton-Mead House refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyShaker Hollow
MunicipalityLewisboro
CommunitySouth Salem
Street Number
Street AddressSpring Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  08/02/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerEthel and Axel Horn
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsFarmhouse
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1795
Structural SystemWood Frame, Interlocking Joints
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceShaker Hollow is historically significant as a surviving example of an earlier, primarily agricultural era in the settlement and growth of Westchester County. The house was owned (1928-1944) by Juliana Force, first director of New York City's Whitney Museum, who collected Shaker furniture and named the property Shaker Hollow. The residence is a good example of late eighteenth century Westchester County farmhouse in materials, construction method, and original plan.
DescriptionShaker Hollow is a ten acre site with a 1795 two story clapboard house, small shed, stone walls, lawns, and gardens. Notable characteristics include foundation and large central chimney and chimney stack of site-quarried stone and unusual double hung sidelights flanking main entrance. Rear and side additions and some interior changes have not obscured strong vernacular eighteenth century character of house.


PropertyThe Homestead
MunicipalityLewisboro
CommunityScarborough
Street Number36
Street AddressMead Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  11/28/00
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  03/29/01
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  11/28/00
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerJames and Susan Henry
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleFederal
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1820
Structural SystemTimber Frame
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe ell in the west façade has been changed by the addition of a picture window and new Dutch door. This room had originally been a porch and was enclosed in the early 20th century. There have been no additions to the house except for a larger grape arbor on the south end. The present owners added a lavatory and bar area where an office had been and moved a door leading to the back stairs. Upstairs, two bathrooms were modernized and a wall removed in the back hall to make a bedroom. The basement has been finished. The summer kitchen was restored in 1975. The rotted floor was replaced with chestnut boards. The chimney was repointed.
Date of Alterations20th century

SignificanceThe Homestead is historically significant in the area of architecture as a locally important example of a Federal period vernacular farmhouse. Built c. 1920 and enlarged soon after, the house was built for the Mead family, one of the early settlers of the hamlet of Waccabuc, who once owned several hundred acres of land in the area and built several residences.
DescriptionThe Homestead, a farmhouse built c. 1820, stands close to Mead Street at the intersection of Schoolhouse Road. Mead Street is the main street of the hamlet of Waccabuc, in the town of Lewisboro. A white painted wooden fence defines the northeast corner of the Homestead property. Within the fence landscaping are very old rhododendrons. Mature trees shade the lawns and field. The main house appears to be highly intact on the exterior and the interior. The main part is four bays wide with a door facing Mead Street. The ell on the south side is three bays wide with a Dutch door in the center bay. There is a verandah across each of the parts with four columns and three and one half columns supporting shallow pitched hip roofs. A gate and walkways lead from Mead Street to each of the doorways. The foundation is of cut stone. The walls are white painted shingles with 6" exposure over frame sheathing. Hewn timbers are visible in the basement and attic. The asphalt shingled gable roofs each have a brick chimney. The interior of the house features a short narrow stairway hall entered from the west elevation. The sitting room, living room, and office all use the main chimney, formerly for fireplaces now for stoves. The trim in the sitting room and living room shows fine workmanship in fluted pilasters surrounding the doorways and carved mantelpieces. Other buildings on the property include a nineteenth-century barn with attached open garage, four-room cottage, a former dog kennel now used as a tool shed, a chicken house in poor repair, and a well house.


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