Pound Ridge Community Church, Pound Ridge

Photograph by Gray Williams

Historic Properties Listing

PropertyHarrison Post Office
MunicipalityHarrison
Community
Street Number258
Street AddressHalstead Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  12/05/89
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/11/89
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  05/11/89
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerUnited States Postal Service
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectLouis A. Simon
BuilderU.S. Treasury Department
Building TypeGovernment
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleColonial Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseGovernment
Current Use, Details
Original UseGovernment
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodCommercial
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1938-9
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsChanges to the lobby include aluminum windows, new furniture, aluminum lockboxes and a widened teller opening.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Harrison Post Office, constructed in 1938-9, is architecturally significant as an intact representative example of the federal architecture erected as part of the public works projects initiated by the United State government during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Its simplified design illustrates forms and decoration derived from American Colonial and Federal period architecture. This so-called Colonial Revival style had become the accepted style for most post offices as well as other federally sponsored public architecture during the 1920s and 1930s. The use of a standard pattern for this building reflects the increasing simplicity of design and standardization of form which are characteristic of post offices of this period, the most prolific period of post office construction in the nation's history. There are approximately 80 post office buildings in New York State that represent this phase of federal design programs, which was largely under the direction of Louis A. Simon, Supervising Architect of the Treasury Department from 1933-9. The design for the Harrison Post Office was the most popular one in New York State, as it was used for thirteen virtually identical buildings across the state. In addition to the architectural importance of the Harrison Post Office, the building contains an artistically significant and well-preserved mural painted in 1941 under the auspices of the Treasury Department's Section of Fine Arts and which depicts a scene of local significance.
DescriptionThe Harrison Post Office is located at 258 Halstead Avenue in the heart of the commercial district in the village of Harrison. The building is sited on the north side of the street between King Street and Harrison Avenue. The post office is set back slightly from the sidewalk; a driveway along the east side of the building leads to a rear parking area. The plot is landscaped with grass, trees, and hedges. The post office retains its integrity on the exterior and interior despite some modern alterations. The Harrison Post Office is a symmetrically massed one-story building clad in random stone ashlar. Of the thirteen New York State post offices built to this design, this is the only one faced with stone as opposed to brick. The central entrance is reached by a flight of granite steps that are lined with original iron railings and flanked by a pair of lamps with replaced tops. The front section of the post office has a slate-covered gable roof crowned by a square flat-toped cupola with Doric pilasters and round-arched vent openings on each face. The rectangular public lobby is entered through a wood and glass vestibule that retains its original doors. The lobby has a white marble dado reaching to county level and gray marble baseboards. The walls and ceiling are plaster, as it the simple cornice that runs around the room. The floors are gold terrazzo. Original fixtures include part of the wooden frames around the teller openings on the screenline, interior doors and bulletin boards, metal grilles above the screenline, and hanging metal lamps. Changes to the lobby include aluminum windows, new furniture, aluminum lockboxes and a widened teller opening.


PropertyReid Hall, Manhattanville College (Ophir Hall)
MunicipalityHarrison
CommunityPurchase
Street Number
Street AddressPurchase Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  03/22/74
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerManhattanville College
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectStanford White; Frederick Law Olmsted (landscape)
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsRenaissance
Current UseEducation
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1892
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations The upper stories and the secondary halls have been significantly altered to accommodate the needs of the school.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceA lavishly decorated residence in the style of a Renaissance Revival castle, Reid Hall was designed in 1892 by Stanford White. Originally constructed as the home of Whitelaw Reid, owner and editor-in-chief of the New York Herald Tribune, the building is now the administrative center and focal point of Manhattanville College campus.
DescriptionFour stories in height with a five-story tower, Reid Hall is composed of a large central block and several projecting wings arranged in an approximately L-shaped plan. The masonry walls of natural granite blocks are marked by a belt course between the second and third floors, and a corbelled battlemented parapet that conceals the flat roof. The original structure consists of the three-bay main block. A one-story porch, accessible from the interior by means of a series of French windows, extends the length of three sides. The five-story tower occupies the projecting central bay of the front elevation and contains the main entrance. A turret, originally located at the southeast corner of the tower has been removed. The wings are laid out asymmetrically but they generally lie in an easterly and westerly direction from the central block. A projection on the south elevation of the T-shaped west wing contains two sets of rectangular mullion windows, and a terrace at the west end forms a porte-cochere for the door at the cellar level. An octagonal room projects from the east wing. The first floor and the main halls on the second and third floors have remained relatively unchanged. The interior of the main hall and the stairs are of pink Numidian marble from Georgia, with accents of yellow Numidian marble from Africa. The rooms in the main block are of French influence, each paneled with carved oak or mahogany inlaid with curly maple and mother-of-pearl, and the ceilings are coffered in plaster. The main rooms on the first floor of the west wing are in the Jacobian style and paneled with oak. There is one Tiffany-style skylight above the main hall on the third floor. The floors in the main hall on the second and third floors are of marble mosaic tiles. The upper stories and the secondary halls have been significantly altered to accommodate the needs of the school. Northeast of the dwelling stands a small one-story stone chapel with a contiguous, circular, two-story stone tower.


PropertyRye Lake Treatment Plant
MunicipalityHarrison
Community
Street Number
Street AddressLake Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  04/28/99
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerWestchester Joint Water Works
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectAlfred Hopkins and Associates
BuilderPrath-Mor Construction Corp., M.C. Maloney, Inc.
Building TypeIndustrial
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleTudor Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsWater treatment plant
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsWater pumping and treatment plant
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodWoodland
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1937-8
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsInterior changes made consisting of removal of original pumps and installation of new treatment equipment.
Date of Alterations1992-1995

SignificanceAt the time of construction of this building in 1938, the only other source of water supply for the Westchester Joint Water Works other than Kensico Reservoir, was the Mamaroneck River. The developemtn of the Rye Lake supply provided reliability and additional capacity to enable the Village of Mamaroneck, Town of Mamaroneck, and Town of Harrison to grow and prosper by being assured of an abundant and reliable supply of excellent quality of water, both for consumption and for fire protection. The building housed the original pumps and treatment equipment that delivered this water to the distribution system and consumers of the Water Works system. The station has been in continous service for over 60 years. The building was constructed using a federal grant under the Public Works Administration program and the architecture reflects the artistic values that were encouraged at that time. The building could be considered a Tudor-style structure. Its historic significance was recognized by a resolution of the Town of Harrison dated October 8, 1997.
DescriptionThe Rye Lake Treatment Plant of the Westchester Joint Water Works is located on land owned by te City of New York. The property is part of the Kinsico Reservoir Watershied. The Treatment Building is on a small peninsula surrounded by the waters of Rye Lake on the south, west, and north, and by the right-of-way of Interstate Route 684 to the east. The only other building in the area is the Rye Lake Pump Station, located approximately 250' west, northwest of the Treatment Building. The Treatment Buliding, which treats water for consumption in the Town of Harrison, Village of Mamaroneck, and Town of Mamaroneck with chlorine, floride, and a corrosion control chemical, is a one-story building with part attic consisting of a main treatment room and smaller rooms for an office, chlorine tanks and electrical equipment. The overall building is 65 feet long by 33 feet wide with a slate gable roof. The windows are leaded glass in steel casements, are round-arched, double five-over-five in certain elevations, double five-pane in others. Trim is cast stone. Gutters are lead-coated copper.


PropertyStony Hill Cemetery
MunicipalityHarrison
Community
Street Number
Street AddressBuckhout Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  06/25/99
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  06/25/99
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  04/06/99
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectN/A
BuilderN/A
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsFunerary
Architectural StyleN/A
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsFunerary
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsFunerary
Structural ConditionDeteriorated
NeighborhoodWoodlands
Threats to BuildingVandalism
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year BuiltEarly 1800s
Structural SystemOther (describe)
Structural System, DetailsN/A
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Stony Hill Cemetery is an intact example of a rural nineteenth-century African-American burial ground in Westchester County. It also contains information about the people and customs of "The Hills," one of a small number of free black communities in Westchester County. The Hills was established c. 1800 by freed slaves of Quakers in the area who were given some rocky land in the hills of the northwestern Town of Harrison. It is likely the cemetery was begun soon after people began to settle the land and it is known a church was built adjacent to the cemetery before 1844. The six-acre wooded cemetery contains an estimated 200 burials, many marked with fieldstone headstones and footstones, as well as several clearly marked stone, including government-issued headstones for Civil War veterans. The church, known as the Methodist Episcopal Zion's Church of the Asbury Colored Peoples Church, was sited near the road. Demolished prior to 1930, its stone foundation is clearly visible. The Stony Hill Cemetery is a unique resource in the Town of Harrison. Its distinctive character, large size, and high degree of preservation make it a remarkable survivor in Westchester County.
DescriptionThe Stony Hill Cemetery is a six and one-half acre site on Buckhout Road in the Silver Lake section of the Town of Harrison. Although only 1.5 miles from the center of the central business district of the City of White Plains, Buckhout Road is rural in character-- a narrow, winding road running through a hilly, wooded area. Parallel ridges of upthrust sedimentary rock running roughly north and south cross the cemetery. Between these ridges are three areas of loose stony soil where almost all of the graves are located. The cemetery is haded by hardwood trees. Most of the graves in the cemetery run east and west and are delineated at the head and foot by unmarked fieldstones. Approximately 200 gravesites could possibly be visibly identified. For information on the cemetery and its gravestones see the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


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