Van Cortlandt Manor Ferry House, Croton

Photograph by Gray Williams

Historic Properties Listing

Property1835 Marble Schoolhouse
MunicipalityEastchester
Community
Street Number388
Street AddressCalifornia Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  12/12/94
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  07/28/05
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  05/24/05
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerEastchester Historical Society
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architectunknown
Builderunknown
Building TypeEducation
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGreek Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseRecreation and Culture
Current Use, DetailsMuseum
Original UseEducation
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityMoved
Date Moved1869
Year Built1835
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsOn the exterior, window sash, shutters, frieze board with brackets and gutters, wood roof and bell tower were replaced to match the original; the masonry of the facades and chimney was repaired and repointed. The door, including surround and transom, is original although the transom glass has been replaced.
Date of Alterations1960s

SignificanceThe Marble Schoolhouse is significant in the area of architecture as a rare surviving example of early 19th century educational architecture in Westchester County. It is also significant in the area of education for its association with the history of education in the county. Built in 1835 of Tuckahoe marble and originally located about 3,000 feet southwest of its present site, it was moved in 1869 to its present site. Serving children from the southern part of Eastchester and northernmost part of Mount Vernon, the school cloased in 1884 and was given to the Town of Eastchester in 1952 and later restored by the Eastchester Historical Society. The schoolhouse is one of the oldest remaining in the county. As with many other schoolhouses of the period, the schoolhouse is vernacular in style, with a vaguely Greek Revival form and with later Victorian elements.
DescriptionThe 1835 schoolhouse borders on the junction of the Cross County Parkway and New Rochelle Road. The school is set back from the road near the southern boundary of the rectagular 12,600 square foot site. It was moved in 1869 from its original site. The one story school building, constructed of locally quarried, rancomly sized, uncoursed beige and gray marble blocks, is three bays wide and one bay deep. The wood shingled gable rook has a small brick chimney and a wood bell tower at the north gable. Of note on the buliding's primary interior space are the plaster walls and coved plaster ceiling, the floors and wainscoting if wide wood boards, and the paneled door in the rear wall. At the rear of the building is a small two bay wide and deep mid-1960s clapboard addition. Sitting on a concrete block foundation, the addition has a shallow shed roof and an exterior brick chimney. In the mid-1960s the Eastchester Historical Society undertook restoration of the exterior and and reconstruction of the interior. For a detailed description of the site, see the file at the Westchester County Historical Society.


Property46 Stewart Place
MunicipalityEastchester
Community
Street Number46
Street AddressStewart Place

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  10/31/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerRosemary Donahue
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleAmerican Colonial
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1760
Structural SystemWood Frame, Interlocking Joints
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsRenovations were done that changed the number of rooms in the home in the 1950s. A new roof was put on the house and the garage in the early 1970s. The chimney was repaired in 1986. Interchangeable screens and storm windows with aluminum frames were also added.
Date of Alterations1950s, 1970s, 1986.

SignificanceIncorporating the earliest extant house in the Town of Eastchester, the 46 Stewart Place site has been continuously occupied for nearly 230 years and has strong archaeological potential.
Description46 Stewart Place is a gable roofed clapboard house in Eastchester on a 2/3 acre site. The house is located on the northwestern corner of the site. Constructed in two sections, the first c. 1760 and the second probably before the end of the eighteenth century, the house retains much original material and detail, including, on the exterior, fieldstone foundation, clapboards with corner boards, and simple gable bargeboards. Windows are of the wood-frame-and-sash, single hung, six over six type with simple surrounds. The interior floors are made of 18th c. wide pine boards. Renovations were done that changed the number of rooms in the home in the 1950s. A new roof was put on the house and the garage in the early 1970s. The chimney was repaired in 1986. Interchangeable screens and storm windows with aluminum frames were also added. Also on the property is a flagstone walkway, mature trees, and a well. For a detailed description of the property see the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyAbijah Morgan House
MunicipalityEastchester
CommunityBronxville
Street Number339
Street AddressPondfield Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  03/20/89
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerFrieda Riggs
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architectunknown
Builderunknown
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleColonial Vernacular
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc.1789-1811
Structural SystemWood Frame, Interlocking Joints
Structural System, Detailsone wing, stone
Photograph Available?Yes
Alterations Building was enlarged in the 1830s. A 20 x 26' wing in compatible style was added c. 1926 and in 1946 other changes were made to the building.
Date of Alterationsc. 1830, 1926, 1946

SignificanceThe oldest existing residence in Bronxville, the Abijah Morgan house retains many architectural details characteristic of the late 18th-early 19th century period including double fireplaces on both first and basement floors, 6 over 6 windows, a hidden staircase, and random width floorboards. The building also has local historical significance. Abijah Morgan served in the War of 1812, and it was at this house that Lt.Col. Jonathan Varian's militia regiment was mustered for the defence of the sound as well as New York City. Also, Morgan was a partner in marble quarries at nearby Tuckahoe which produced stone utilized in the construction of numerous buildings both locally and in NewYork City. Alexander Masterson, a later owner of the property, was also involved in the Tuckahoe quarries.
DescriptionThe Abijah Morgan house, now located on two-thirds of an acre, stands at the corner of Pondfield Road (formerly New Rochelle Road) and White Plains Road (route 22), once an important intersection and which location has led some to believe that it served as a tavern in the early 19th century. The western portion of the house, thought to be the oldest, is three bays wide. A three bay addition was added to the eastern end c. 1835. There are endwall chimneys east and west and another chimney in a compatible rear addition built c. 1935. The building is two stories high and two bays deep, the lower level being sheathed in clapboard, while wood shingles cover the upper story. A shed roofed porch or veranda runs the full length of the front. The interior has built-in cupboards and storage areas and large fireplaces which would have served both for heating and cooking. For a more complete description of the Morgan property see the files held by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyBronxville Post Office
MunicipalityEastchester
CommunityBronxville
Street Number
Street AddressPondfield Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  12/05/89
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  11/17/88
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  11/17/88
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerUnited States Postal Service
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectEric Kebbon
Builderunknown
Building TypeGovernment
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleColonial Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseGovernment
Current Use, Details
Original UseGovernment
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1930s
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsThis building remains little changed over time. The modern one story addition at the rear has little visual affect. The interior was modernized in 1967 with the addition of three tellers' windows, tables and lockboxes; but care was taken to preserve the original moldings and trim. The façade is essentially unchanged.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Bronxville Post Office is architecturally significant as a fine example of the Colonial Revival style as applied to public buildings during the early twentieth century. Adaptations, not copies, these buildings utilized Greek (here, the Doric Order), Roman and Georgian elements to create functional and attractive buildings. Eric Kebbon (1891-1964), the architect who designed this building, was a major figure in this movement. During his career he planned and oversaw the building of six New York State post offices as well as several federal buildings and no less than one hundred New York City school buildings. Also, of great importance is the fact that preserved in the post office lobby is a mural by John Sloan (1871-1951), a leading American artist and member of the "Eight" or Ashcan School, a group of artists whose work mirrored American life during the first half of the twentieth century. This bucolic scene picturing the arrival in Bronxville of the first mail train is the only post office mural attributed to Sloan.
DescriptionLocated on less than an acre of land on the east side of Pondfield Road between Tanglewylde and Meadow Avenues, the Bronxville Post Office is a particularly fine example of the early twentieth century Colonial Revival Style as applied to public buildings. The one-and-one-half-story rectangular structure is faced with brick trimmed with limestone. The entrance façade is designed to resemble a Greek temple with six limestone pilasters flanking the doorway above which is a Doric frieze. The rectangular public lobby is entered through a vestibule and has offices on each side and a large mail sorting room in the rear. There is also a modern one story rear addition. With the exception of this the original building remains little changed. For a more detailed description of the post office refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyBronxville Womens Club Clubhouse
MunicipalityEastchester
CommunityBronxville
Street Number135
Street AddressMidland Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  10/20/89
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerBronxville Women's Club members
Tax Map Available?Yes
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section14      Tax Block4      Tax Lot10

ArchitectPenrose Stout
BuilderA. Barbaresi and Son
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsClubhouse
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, DetailsEclectic
Current Use
Current Use, DetailsClubhouse
Original Use
Original Use, DetailsClubhouse
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1928
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsEssentially in the original state other than for two full length windows which were converted to fire doors in 1931
Date of Alterations

SignificanceDesigned by Penrose Stout, an important architect of the period, the Bronxville Women's Club was intended to be a cultural, social and educational center for local women and, to some extent, the community as a whole. It has over the years served many purposes and has become a Bronxville landmark. The interior layout with ballroom, tearoom and card rooms is an early example of a building designed specifically to function as a women's club house.
DescriptionBuilt in 1928 on a 12,000 square foot plot at the corner of Midland and Tanglewylde Avenues, the Bronxville Women's Club is a rectangular one story stucco and stone building with slate roof. It is five bays wide and three deep and has a central section flanked by north and south wings. The entrance is through a loggia consisting of four Ionic pilasters. The central section has three dormers and a massive chimney at each end; while each wing has a chimney and a pair of dormers. The interior, designed for club functions, includes a large ballrooms, a kitchen and various rooms designed for meetings, card playing and reading. For a detailed description of the property see the materials on file with the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyLawrence Park Historic District
MunicipalityEastchester
CommunityBronxville
Street Number
Street AddressRoughly bounded by Pondfield Road; Valley Road; Northern Avenue; Prescott Avenue; Park Avenue; Tanglewylde

Historic District NameLawrence Park Historic District
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status? Yes  01/23/80
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerMultiple Ownership
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectWilliam Van Duzer Lawrence
Builder
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsResidence; commercial; religious
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsTudor Revival, Classical Revival, Colonial Revival
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsResidence; commercial; religious
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsResidence; commercial; religious
Structural ConditionExcellent; Good
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceLawrence Park is architecturally, historically, and culturally significant. The district boundaries include the Sunset Hill area where the Mohican Indians first deeded the land to white settlers during the seventeenth century; physical reminders of eighteenth and nineteenth-century agricultural use; and the largely intact late nineteenth and early twentieth-century residential development. The Park’s developer, William Van Duzer Lawrence, a wealthy businessman, philanthropist, and founder of Sarah Lawrence College, personally oversaw the design and construction of the first homes in Lawrence Park. Lawrence engaged architects whose ideas concerning the compatibility of site and structure matched his own and he encouraged well-known artists and writers to make the Park their home. Many of these residents came to figure prominently, as did Lawrence himself, in the cultural, social, and political milieu of the Village of Bronxville. In spite of intrusions and alterations to buildings within the district, the ambience of the Park has not changed. The district still retains the coherence and character of an architecturally distinctive turn-of-the-century suburban development and it continues to fulfill its historically important role in the cultural life of the surrounding community.
DescriptionThe Lawrence Park Historic District in Bronxville is a cohesive, primarily residential area and an excellent example of early suburban growth. Beyond the edges of the Park to the south and west is the commercial section of the Village of Bronxville. Within the boundaries of Lawrence Park are ninety-eight structures, the majority of which are architecturally or historically significant. Developed on the late nineteenth and early twentieth century on twenty acres of land closely associated with the historical evolution of the surrounding community, the area attracted as residents many prominent artists and writers of the period. The Park structures were built on a wooded hillside, along winding roads. While in close proximity to one another, they achieve a feeling of seclusion and privacy. Few of the houses have had major alterations, and today the Park retains much of its original character. For information on the structures in the Lawrence Park Historic District see the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society..


PropertyMasterson-Dusenberry House
MunicipalityEastchester
CommunityBronxville
Street Number90
Street AddressWhite Plains Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  04/16/80
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerVivian Wills
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectAlexander Masterton (?)Penrose V. Stout (addition)
Builderpossibly Alexander Masterton
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGreek Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1835
Structural SystemWood Frame, Interlocking Joints
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsIn the late1920s a compatible wing, designed by local architect, Penrose V. Stout, was added to east and south sides of house. This two story addition accomodates a kitchen, dining room, butler's pantry and glass inclosed porch on the first level; a bedroom, bath and open deck on the second. An Italianate balustrade was added to roof line in the mid 19th century, and a fireplace and chimney were built into the new kitchen wing in the '20s. Otherwise, the house remains largely intact, inside and out.
Date of Alterations 1850s, 1920s

SignificanceOne of the earliest existing homes in Bronxville, the Masterton-Dusenberry house not only retains most of its Greek Revival characteristics including a splendid porch with Doric entablature featuring four fluted columns and a delicate railing. Equally important and extremely unusual, the house is a veritable living museum containing today the furniture and household emplements owned and used by three generations of the family as well as a portrait gallery where may be seen the likenesses of family members. The property is also important for the association of Alexander Masterton with the once thriving Tuckahoe marble quarries.
DescriptionSituated on a 3/4 acre lot on the old White Plains Road (Route 22) in Bronxville, the Masterton-Dusenberry house was built in the 1830s for Alexander Masterton, a stone mason and owner of a Tuckahoe marble quarry. Upon his death it passed to his daughter Mary Dusenberry and from her to her daughter, Amie Dusenberry who occupied the house until it passed out of the family at her death in 1959. Designed in the Greek Revival style (possibly by Masterton who had a reputation as architect and builder) it originally had various dependencies including a large barn. All the other structures are now gone. A classical porch fronts the house with doors opening into an entrance hall beyond which is a back hall. Left front is the original living room (now a family portrait gallery), and behind this the current parlor, formerly the dining room. A central staircase leads up to the second floor which contains four bedrooms, an original fifth having been converted to a bath. The attic contains two servant bedrooms and several storage spaces. In the basement is the original kitchen featuring a massive cooking fireplace and bake oven. All these features are substantially intact. A 1920s addition is discussed under "alterations", and more detailed information may be found in the National Register files held by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyThe Reformed Church of Bronxville
MunicipalityEastchester
CommunityBronxville
Street Number
Street AddressPondfield Road and Midland Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  10/20/89
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerThe Reformed Church of America
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectHarry Leslie Walker
BuilderWilliam L. Crow Construction Company
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1925-1926
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Detailswood frame with interlocking joints
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsA church school, office wing and congregational hall were added in 1956. In 1958 the addition of a new organ required changes to the Chancel, and an additional room off the narthex was constructed. Otherwise, the buildings remains substantially intact, inside and out.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe building is an excellent and well maintained example of the twentieth century Neo-Gothic revival style and anchors one corner of the well-known Bronxille "four corners". Among its better known parishioners were the Congressman, Ralph Gwinn and Samuel G. Inman, an advisor to President Franklin D. Roosevelt and the originator of Roosevelt's "Good Neighbor Policy" which was designed to establish reciprocal relationships with South American countries and end decades of American interference in that region.
DescriptionBuilt in 1925-1926 on a 2.14 acre site at the corner of Pondfield Road and Midland Avenue, the Reformed Church of Bronxville replaced a wooden church building, Bronxille's first, which had been errected in 1850. Designed in the Gothic Revival stryle by a local architect, Harry Leslie Walker, with compatible 1925-1926 additions by Eggers and Higgins of New York City; the building is in the Victorian Gothic Revival style. The main sanctury is rectangular, five bays deep and three wide with an 100' tall square entrance tower with corner buttresses. Material is cut stone with Gothic-arched stained glass windows. The sanctuary is joined to the church school addition by an arched cloister. Further details as to the history and construction of the church can be obtained from the files held by the Westchester County Historical Society.


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