Sarah Tidd Paulding, Van Cortlandtville

Photograph by Gray Williams

Historic Properties Listing

Property126 Old Post Road
MunicipalityCortlandt
CommunityCroton-on-Hudson
Street Number126
Street AddressOld Post Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  10/20/89
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerMary Etta and Ronald Friedwald
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectHarvey Stevenson (conversion)
BuilderGeorge Baker (original building)
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsEnglish Cotswold
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseGarage
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1904; 1925 converted
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsOriginally built as a garage and storage building on the Stevenson estate which consisted of some twenty residences and outbuildings built over a period of forty years beginning in 1902; this house was converted, c. 1924-1925, from a single story flat roof structure to a two-story half-timbered residence patterned(as were all but one of the so-called Stevenson houses) on English Cotswold cottages. Also,at this time a two car garage and a tool shed were added to the north façade. The exterior of the 1924-1925 conversion remains largely unchanged; however, the interior has been modernized.
Date of Alterationsc.1904-1905;1924-1925

SignificanceThis building is important as a significant component of what was essentially an early planned community based on a fifteen acre property with all but one of the homes patterned after English half-timbered Cotswold style cottages. Surrounded by a high wall and facing inward upon a large common area of lawns and gardens, the "Stevenson Houses" as they are known, also became home to a large number of artists and intellectuals. Number 126 was for a time the residence of Prof. Philip K. Jessup of Columbia University, who served as American Ambassador-At-Large during World War II. The artist A. Stirling Calder, father of Alexander Calder is said to have had a studio in the building; and during the 1950s the artist Oscar Lubeck intertained a host of well known artists and intellectuals including A.A. Milne, Walter Lantz, the creator of Woody Woodpecker and Harold Gray originator of the Little Orphan Annie comic strip. Many of these visitors left their signatures on cupboard doors in the house.
DescriptionNumber 126 Old Post Road was built, c. 1904-1905 as a garage and service building to Wyndhurst, a large eclectic medieval style mansion which was designed by the architect Percy Griffen and constructed largely under the supervision of the owner, Elizabeth Stevenson. Emboldened by her success with Wyndhurst, though lacking any training as an architect, Mrs. Stevenson then set out to create a planned community of homes and outbuildings all in the vaguely Medieval or Cotswold style. Her son, Harvey, who was an architect joined in this project, and in 1924 converted Number 126 from garage to residence. The work was well done. The raised gabled second story blends so well with the former flat roofed garage that to the eye it appears that the structure was always a home. Of cut stone, the house is three bays wide and two deep with a pair of end chimneys and shingled roof with dormers. It remains, today, little changed since 1924.


Property6 Miles of Bear Mountain Road, Including Toll House
MunicipalityCortlandt
Community
Street Number
Street AddressRoute 6/202 between Bear Mountain Bridge and Roa Hook Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  04/01/79
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerN.Y.S. Highway Department
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architectunknown
BuilderTerry and Tench Construction Co.- Carey Construction
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsTravel
Architectural StyleTudor Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsRoad/ abandoned (toll house)
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsRoad/ toll house
Structural ConditionGood; Deteriorated
NeighborhoodOpen land, woodland
Threats to BuildingVandalism
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1923-24
Structural SystemWood Frame, Light Members
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThough it is in a deteriorated state, the simple Tudor style tollhouse retains most of its original period features. Of special note are the steep gable roof, exposed half timbering and smooth, stuccoed finish. The structure’s major significance lies in its association with the scenic highway and the Bear Mountain Bridge construction and operation. Route 6/202, the Bear Mountain Bridge Road is one of the most picturesque in the Hudson Valley and together with the Storm King Highway provides a unique combination unequalled in the state. The roadway and supporting scenic detailing such as the stone walls, are maintained in their original condition and have not been significantly altered since their construction. The highway is significant in its engineering achievement and its contribution to the history of transportation in the region.
DescriptionBuilt 1923-1924 by the Harriman family Bear Mountain Bridge Company as a private toll road and bridge, the span and associated road and toll houses were purchased by New York State in 1940. The first vehicular bridge to span the Hudson south of Albany, the Bear Mountain Bridge is suspension type with steel towers and wire cables anchored in the bedrock on both sides of the river.It remains in use and substantially unaltered. There were originally two toll houses; one at the west bank entrance of the bridge; the other at the beginning of the toll road some some three miles south of the east end of the bridge. The latter has been abandoned since the State stopped collecting a road toll. The bridge toll is now collected from modern toll booths.The original bridge toll house is eclectic rustic combining Tudor, Elizabethan and English Cottage elements. Built of rough field stone, it has a steeply pitched slate roof and square tower with cupola. For further details see the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyAaron Copland House
MunicipalityCortlandt
Community
Street Number1538
Street AddressWashington Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  03/06/03
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  10/02/03
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  03/06/03
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerAaron Copland Fund for Music/The Copland Heritage Association
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsModern Movement: Wrightian
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsRecreation and Culture: music facility
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site Integrity
Date Moved
Year Builtmid 1940s
Structural SystemWood Frame, Interlocking Joints
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsThere have been no significant changes to the house since it was built in the mid 1940s. In 1960 Coplin added the duplex apartment to the rear of the garage. Inside and out the buildings remain as Copland knew them.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Aaron Copland house is significant, not for its architecture, but for the fact that for thirty years (1960 until his death in 1990) it was the home of Copland one of the most famous composers and conductors of the twentieth century. Winner of the 1945 Pulitzer Prize for music, Copland was the composer of some of America's most popular music including the ballet suites Appalachian Spring and Billy The Kid and the symphonic piece, Fanfare for the Common Man. His former home near Peekskill is one of the very few buildings associated with American music to be preserved for the public.
DescriptionSituated on a hill at the end of a winding driveway, the Copland houses sits on a partially wooded 2.5 acre tract. Stone steps lead up to a simple one story house architecturally combining modern ranch with certain elements of Frank Lloyd Wright's Prairie School. The L-shaped one-story clapboard building sits atop a rock outcrop. A few yards away is a two-car detached garage with small duplex apartment. The home interior is dominated by a large glassed-in studio in which Copland kept a piano and did his composing. There are five other rooms, library, two bedrooms, living room and kitchen. In these are found a variety of Copland memorabilia from furniture and kitchen utensils to books and musical scores. For further information on the buildings see the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyAsbury United Methodist Church/ Bethel Chapel and Cemetery
MunicipalityCortlandt
CommunityCroton-on-Hudson
Street Number19
Street AddressOld Post Road South

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  10/04/99
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  03/31/00
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  10/04/99
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerAsbury United Methodist Church
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architectunknown
Builderunknown
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, DetailsColonial Vernacular (Chapel)
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1883/1780-90(chapel)
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Detailswood frame (Chapel)
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsThe major exterior alteration to the 1883 Asbury Methodist Church is a connecting passageway between it and an adjacent bank building which was purchased in 1968 as an educational building. Interior alterations include an alter, pulpit, lectern and two organs; the first in 1912, the secind in 1948. In 1925 the basement was enlarged to provide office space and a new heating system installed. The chapel, amazingly, is little altered from its original box-like form. There are small additions to the gabel ends; the front one very early and possible original; the latter built in the 1920s to house cemetary maintenance equipment. The interior, typical of early 19th century country churches, remains little changed.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Asbury United Methodist Church complex is significant as an example of the development of a religious facility from origin until the present time. In most cases when the congregation outgrew its original house of worship the building was torn down, adapted to another purpose or sold off. Here, when the c. 1780-1790 chapel was replaced by a much larger church in 1883, the former building was preserved, being used today for weddings, funerals and other events. Moreover, the church and, particularly the chapel, are closely associated with the Van Cortlandt family which once owned the land on which they stand. Pierre Van Cortlandt gave the land upon which the chapel was built, and it was there, during religious services, that his son, Philip, met the famous Mohawk chiefton, Joseph Brant (Thayendanegea). They recalled over dinner that night the time that one of Brant' s warriors had nearly killed Colonel Van Cortlandt during a Revolutionary War skirmish! Finally, both buildings, church and chapel, remain largely unaltered over time.
DescriptionThe Asbury United Methodist Church and Chapel are located in the Village of Croton-On-Hudson in northwestern Westchester County. The chapel was built c. 1780-1790 on land donated by Pierre Van Cortlandt whose family were early adherents to the faith and long time supporters of the church. The building was square and of white washed clapboard with its only distinguishing feature being the tall triple-hung twelve -light sash on the side elevations. It stands on four acres of land (later expanded to six) and is surrounded by a graveyard with stones dating back to 1800.By the 1880s the congregation had outgrown this structure; and, in 1883, a new building, of brick in the Victorian Gothic Revival style, was errected on a three-quarter acre plot some 700 feet south-east of the Chapel. This church is rectangular with a square entrance tower and slate roof. For further infoirmation on these structures see the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyBaker House
MunicipalityCortlandt
CommunityCroton-on-Hudson
Street Number35
Street AddressOld Post Road North

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  10/31/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerJoseph and Marilyn Kelly
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
BuilderGeorge Baker
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleCraftsman
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built19Dobbs Ferry
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsAlterations exterior and interior are minimal. An interior wall between the kitchen and pantry was removed in order to enlarge the former, and the interior has been repainted. Also, the den walls have been stuccoed and a stained glass panel added to the ceiling. Otherwise, the house remains largely as it was built.
Date of Alterationsc. 1972-1976

SignificanceThe Baker house is significant as an almost entirely intact example of the custom Craftsman Style home as interpreted by a master builder. It was also the home, c. 1972-1976 of the then well known advertising executive, Charles Davidson.
DescriptionNamed for its builder, George Baker, who was the contractor on most of the "Stevenson Houses" in Croton, this building was constructed in a novel adaptation of the Craftsman style popular in the early twentieth century. The employment of hollow terracotta tile for the walls is rare if not unique, and the construction details reflect the work of a master craftsman. Moreover, the retention over the years of original plumbing, lighting fixtures and utilities such as stove, sinks and even the furnace provide a vivid reminder of the Craftsman style. For further details as to construction see the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyCortlandt Furnace
MunicipalityCortlandt
Community
Street Number
Street AddressOff Furnace Dock Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  05/21/92
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerMario Velardo
Institutional OwnerMario Development Corp
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architectunknown
Builderunknown
Building TypeIndustrial: iron furnace and mill complex
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleNA
Architectural Style, Details
Current Use
Current Use, Detailswoodlands
Original Use
Original Use, Detailsiron furnace; later grist mill (1860s-)
Structural ConditionDeteriorated
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to BuildingPossible development of property
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc.1765-1766
Structural SystemNA
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsNA, all buildings gone
Date of Alterations

SignificanceArchaeologically significant as site of eighteenth century iron furnace and a much later (19th-20th century) grist mill. However, all buildings associated with either venture are now long gone.
DescriptionCortlandt furnace was one of many iron extraction and founding ventures established in Westchester County during the 18th and 19th centuries. Located just off Furnace Brook Road in the Town of Cortlandt, it was situated on the present Furnace Brook which was damed to provide water for the manufactory. The furnace was built, c. 1765-1766, by Peter Hasenclever, a German iron master. The site was considered good as it lay within a half mile of the Hudson River, allowing easy shipment of the product. However, the iron ore proved inadequate, and the furnace was shut down sometime before the Revolutionary War. Before 1800 a grist mill was located on the site, its buildings apparently built, at least in part, of stones scavanged from the furnace ruins. This business also was gone by 1879, and the area now is wooded and overgrown with only foundation stones and walls to mark the location of the furnace and mill. For further information see files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyCroton North Railroad Station
MunicipalityCortlandt
CommunityCroton-on-Hudson
Street Number
Street AddressSenasqua Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  08/27/87
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  07/27/87
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerMal Janine Schwartz Snow
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, DetailsRailway Station
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsQueene Anne and Craftsman,eclectic
Current UseCommercial
Current Use, Details
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, DetailsRailroad Station
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1892
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsOnly exterior alterations are replacement of slate shingles with asphalt, enclosure of the porte cochere with stuccoed cinder block walls and additions of skylights and glass block insertions. The interior was greatly altered in 1984 with office space created in the former porte cochere and attic space made accessible by a new staircase. The entrance formerly on the east end of the porte cochere was replaced by one at the southwest corner of the station and the porte cochere.
Date of Alterations1970s; 1984

SignificanceThe Croton North Railroad Station, though altered, is important as an example of the stations built all along the New York Central's Hudson River Line during the late19th and early 20th century; most of which are now gone. Built for efficiency and passenger comfort, it was set paralell to the tracks and and had a broad hip roof with wide overhang to provide shelter during storms. Both design and materials employed reflect the station's function as a link in a great railway system which today hardly exists.
DescriptionThe Croton North railway station was built c. 1892 on land acquired by the New York Central and Hudson Railroad. It served as a passenger station until 1963 when it was sold for commercial use passing through various hands including those of a man who, interestingly enough, sold model trains and called his business, The Roundhouse. The building originally had a wide spreading hip roof with overhang along the trackside and Queen Anne design characteristics. It has now been modified by enclosure of the porte cochere to provide work space, expansion of the attic and other alterations designed to fit the building for commercial use. It remains today one of the few turn of the century stations along the New York Central's Hudson River route.


PropertyJohn Jones Homestead
MunicipalityCortlandt
CommunityVan Cortlandtville
Street Number
Street AddressOregon Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  04/14/89
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  04/14/89
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  04/14/89
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerMr. And Mrs. Hugh Gaines
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleColonial
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1750
Structural SystemTimber Frame
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsHome was at one time a 2 family home. Now it is back to a single family dwelling. The kitchen and bathroom have been modernized.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe John Jones Homestead is architecturally significant as a rare, highly intact example of 18th-century domestic architecture in the lower Hudson Valley region of New York State. The house, located north of Peekskill in the small hamlet of Van Cortlandtville, Westchester County, retains original materials and craftsmanship characteristic of historic vernacular building practices in the region. These elements, including the rough-hewn, heavy timber beams and mortise and tenon jointing in the house framing, the brick noggin of the wall construction, and the massive boulders in the foundation walls reflect the construction practices of pre-industrial America.
DescriptionThe John Jones homestead is located on the north side of Oregon Road in the hamlet of Van Cortlandtville. The structure is a large, one-and-one-half story 18th-century residence with Federal style detailing. Constructed on a massive rubble stone foundation, this five-bay, rectangular, heavy timber frame building is sheathed in wood shingles with beaded edge corner boards. The broadly pitched gambrel roof is pierced by three massive brick end chimneys and is sheathed in replacement asbestos shingles. The rectangular main block is built into a hill, with a full subsurface cellar that is exposed on the northwest corner. Off this corner a one-story rectangular wing extends out to the north. The front façade has four six-over-six double-hung sash windows on either side of the oversized front door. Three dormers pierce the gambrel roof on the front façade. The interior of the John Jones homestead retains a high degree of integrity. The cellar of the main block has a dirt floor and foundation walls constructed of massive boulder stone. The first floor layout is a characteristic center passage floor plan with two rooms on either side. Originally the second floor also followed the same layout but now the center hall has been shortened. Although altered, the second floor does retain wide board flooring and some beaded-edge door and window surrounds. The roof framing is visible in the attic. The one intact traceried window in the east attic wall retains panes of original crown glass. For more information on the John Jones house refer to the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyOld Croton Aqueduct
MunicipalityCortlandt
Community
Street Number
Street AddressCortlandt to Yonkers

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  12/02/74
National Historic Landmark Status? Yes  
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerNY State Parks and Recreation office
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectChief Engineer, John B. Jervis
Builder
Building Type
Building Type, Details Aqueduct
Architectural StyleN/A
Architectural Style, Details
Current Usehiking trail/ conduit for electric telephone cable
Current Use, Details
Original Use
Original Use, Detailswater supply
Structural ConditionFair
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1837-1842
Structural SystemConcrete
Structural System, Detailsbrick/stone
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsNo longer in use; last water was drawn from aqueduct in 1965. Since 1971 it has served as a conduit for telephone and electrical lines. A trailway used by hikers and joggers now occupies the surface.
Date of Alterationsclosed to NYC 1955; to Westchester 1965

SignificanceA remarkable feat of engineering, the Croton Aqueduct was the longest such structure built since ancient times and is exceeded in length only by the Roman Aqua Marcia built in 144 b.c. At 7 x 8.5' its interior diameter exceeded all previous aqueducts, ancient or modern.
DescriptionThe forty mile long Croton Aqueduct was built 1837-1842 to connect the Croton Reservoir and dam with the receiving reservoir in Manhattan and thus provide New York City with a supply of fresh, clean water. Built of brick, stone and hydraulic cement, the aqueduct system consisted of a tunnel, ventilator shafts, gatehouses, viaducts and culverts. In some places the aqueduct was tunneled through rock in others it crossed ravines and watercourses by way of great arches.


PropertyOld St. Peter's Church
MunicipalityCortlandt
CommunityVan Cortlandtville
Street Number
Street AddressLocust Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  03/07/73
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  07/07/72
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerSt. Peter's Church, Cortlandt, in the Village of Peekskill
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
Neighborhood
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1766-67
Structural SystemWood Frame
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsDuring restoration of St. Peter's in 1964, interior furnishings, including box pews, were introduced according to period examples since removal of floorboards and plaster as at earlier date had eliminated any traces of the original pew arrangement. The flooring has been replaced, the walls replastered, and the parapet of the gallery refaced. The exterior has been painted a shade of brown that laboratory tests have indicated as the original color, while the interior remains unpainted. During the restoration of St. Peter's, the original paneled exterior doors and their hardware were found hung in place but encased within boarding.
Date of Alterations1964

SignificanceSimple and well proportioned, St. Peter’s Church is a rare surviving example of a clapboard edifice following the early plan of Church of England structures. A landmark of the early settlement of Van Cortlandtville, it served during the Revolution as a hospital for the troops of General Rochambeau.
DescriptionA simple structure of eighteenth century proportions, St. Peter's Church measures a mere twenty-eight feet by thirty-six feet. Set upon a foundation of dry stonework, the wooden frame is sheathed by clapboards, some of which are beaded while others, lacking the beading, appear to date from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. A particularly distinctive feature of the exterior is the shingled roof that curves gently at the eaves, a feature most associated with Dutch or German construction in the North American colonies. The north and south elevations are devoid of fenestration. There are two semicircular-headed windows on the east elevation, and on the west two identical windows flank the doorway. Built according to the early plan common to structures of the Church of England, St. Peter's Church is entered on the long, or west, side. The pulpit stands in the center of the east wall, opposite the entrance and midway between the two windows. A gallery supported by six posts extends the length of the north and west walls.


PropertyOld St. Peter's Church and Old Cemetery at Van Cortlandtville
MunicipalityCortlandt
CommunityVan Cortlandtville
Street Number
Street AddressOregon Road at Locust Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/15/04
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  04/20/04
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  01/15/04
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building Type
Building Type, Details
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current Use
Current Use, Details
Original Use
Original Use, Details
Structural Condition
Neighborhood
Threats to Building
Site Integrity
Date Moved
Year Built
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

Significance
Description


PropertyVan Cortlandt Manor
MunicipalityCortlandt
CommunityCroton-on-Hudson
Street Number
Street AddressSouth Riverside Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  10/15/66
National Historic Landmark Status? Yes  
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerDana Creel
Institutional OwnerSleepy Hollow Restorations, Inc.
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
BuilderStephanus Van Cortlandt
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleColonial, Other
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsMuseum
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year BuiltBetween 1683 and 1749
Structural Systemmas`
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsBetween 1688 and 1745, it is probable that the roof was raised and the verandah added. In 1749, the home was enlaged by Pierre Van Cortlandt, Third Lord of the Manor. He added a second story and modified the earlier building as seen today. It was the first time it was occupied as a permanent year-round home. In the 19th century two wings were added to the house, but these have disappeared giving the house, today, the appearance of the time when it was home to Pierre Van Cortlandt.
Date of AlterationsBetween 1688 and 1745, 1749, and the 19th Century

SignificanceThe Van Cortlandt Manor is of outstanding importance as a physical document of the frontier culture of the Hudson Valley region during the colonial era. It is a simple and unique symbol of the economic and political development of the more rugged life on the Hudson frontier as contrasted with the more elaborate manorial life on the baronies nearer the provincial capital as New York City. The manor is furthermore one of the few remaining landmarks of the Hudson Valley which has witnessed the entire development of that region from the period of European settlement to the present day. Architecturally, the site is undeniably important. Its simplicity of line and detail sets it apart from any other manorial dwelling in this region. Its construction intimately reflects the needs of life on an expanding frontier, in contrast with the refinements of detail found in such as ostentatious colonial home as Philipse Manor Hall, at Yonkers. An usually fine specimen of the Dutch-English colonial type, the Van Cortlandt Manor House is one of the best-preserved examples of colonial architecture of the 18th century tradition, even though a small portion of the structure was doubtless built in the last quarter of the 17th century and later enlarged.
DescriptionThe Van Cortlandt Manor, as we see it today, comprises a number of major and minor buildings, some of which are restorations of original material, others being more or less complete reconstructions. The most important of the group is the Manor House itself, whose existence dates from the 17th century. The property is located on Riverside Avenue in Croton-on-Hudson. Possibly as early as 1665, the sturdy stone walls of the basement of the later Manor House formed the sides of a border trading post and fort. By 1677, Stephanus Van Cortlandt began to acquire land at this site, and between 1681 and 1687, appears to have begun the first unity of his country house on the old fort’s walls. It was not until 1749 however that the building became a Manor House when Pierre Van Cortlandt, Third Lord of the Manor, occupied it as a permanent all-year residence. During the Revolution, the walls of the Manor House repeatedly welcomed Rochambeau, Lafayette, von Steuben, Washington, and other leaders of the American forces. The Manor House is a two-and-a-half story building, built into the side of a hill so that the ground floor is on grade on the south and the floor above is on grade on the north. The walls are of sandstone, massive in the basement to a thickness of three feet, with wide mortar joints, and openings at the jambs and sills trimmed in yellow "Dutch Brick." All of the exposed stone had once been plastered or stuccoed and scored with mortar joints, to imitate coursed ashlar. This was removed sometime during the 19th century with the result that the original stone joints then exposed were altered. Two large wings were added in the 19th century which have now been removed. Between 1688 and 1745, it is probable that the roof was raised and the verandah added. In 1747, Pierre Van Cortlandt inherited the house and in the next two years, made considerable improvements so that he might occupy it the year-round. All of the existing original wall paneling probably dates from these years, and the too, the roof was raised to its existing shape and lines. That roof, a Flemish gambrel, is one of the most beautiful features of this handsome house, a status achieved by its grand dramatic sweep, its clean, crisp lines, and by its proportions. The basement floor contains a large kitchen room, a sitting room called the Old Parlour, and a long narrow storage room behind the front two rooms. Most of the living after the 1740s was done on the floor above, where there were four rooms, two to either side of a stair entrance hall. Also on the property are the Ferry House and the Ice House. Further information on both as well additional material on the main house can be found in the files of the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyVan Cortlandt Upper Manor House
MunicipalityCortlandt
CommunityVan Cortlandtville
Street Number
Street AddressOregon Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  04/02/81
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  02/09/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerTown of Cortlandt
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
BuilderPierre Van Cortlandt
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural Style
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsNursing home
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionFair
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1770s
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, DetailsWood frame
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsIn addition to the major additions on the house, minor alterations include a one-story commercial kitchen of masonry block at the rear, and enclosed porches on the west and north sides.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe southern section of the historically significant Upper Manor House was built by the prominent Van Cortlandt family sometime during the third quarter of the eighteenth century. The wealthy Van Cortlandt family owned vast land areas in northern Westchester County. During the American Revolution, the family left the Lower Manor House in Croton-on-Hudson to seek refuge at the upper manor. Although located in a relatively isolated area of northern Westchester County, the war took its toll on the large residence in the form of neglect. After 1783, Pierre Van Cortlandt repaired the house and remained there until his death in 1848. Subsequently, the house was used as a country estate during the late 19th century, then as a convalescent home for children, and finally, as the Cortlandt Nursing Home. Although the house has been extensively enlarged for various uses, it still retains numerous period features of recalls important episodes on the growth of Westchester County.
DescriptionThe historically significant Van Cortlandt Upper Manor House is located on a less than one acre lot on the town of Cortlandt. The large, brick structure is set back approximately 250 feet from Oregon Road in a sparsely developed residential area. It is surrounded by mature trees and open lawn. A modern nursing home is situated nearby. The building is a combination of the original house, two large additions, and several minor alterations. The principal structure is the five-bay, two and one-half story brick house constructed in the third quarter of the 18th century. Directly behind and connected to the original house is the large two and one-half story north wing constructed of conventional wood framing and stucco in the 1920s. A single-story annex of frame construction and brick veneer, located immediately to the east of the main house, was built in the 1950s. The gable roofs of the main house and north wing are covered with slate. The kitchen has a flat roof and the annex has an asphalt shingled gable roof. Most windows are the double-hung wood type. The following 19th century decorative features are found on the main house: A long one-story front porch with decorative columns, trim and brackets; a bracketed wood cornice at roof line; bargeboards with finials on the main gable end and dormers; and a classically inspired front door with sidelights. Numerous period interior elements also survive in the main house and include marble fireplaces, an intact basement, and the principal staircase with simple wood balusters and railing.


PropertyVan Cortlandtville School
MunicipalityCortlandt
CommunityVan Cortlandtville
Street Number297
Street AddressLocust Avenue

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  04/07/89
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  04/07/89
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  03/03/89
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerVan Cortlandtville Historical Society occupies the building
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architect
Builder
Building TypeEducation
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGothic Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsHistorical Society
Original UseEducation
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
Neighborhood
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1850
Structural SystemWood Frame
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe Van Cortlandtville Historical Society and the Lakeland Board of Education has restored the building.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Van Cortlandtville School is historically and architecturally significant as a rare, intact, surviving example of a nineteenth-century one-room schoolhouse in Westchester County. Erected during a period of educational reform, the building is a representative example of a one-room rural elementary school, a building type that was the central feature of New York State's embryonic educational system in the nineteenth century. The schoolhouse embodies distinctive characteristics of this building type, including frame construction, small size, large windows, separate boys' and girls' entrances and one-room with vestibule plan. Additionally, the construction of a second classroom on the rear of the building is significant as a reminder of the transition from one-room to multi-room education facilities. The school is also architecturally significant as a rare example of Gothic Revival architecture applied on a small scale to a modest local schoolhouse. Although the school was closed in 1935 during the period of school consolidation and centralization, it has been preserved and sensitively restored by the Van Cortlandtville Historical Society.
DescriptionThe Van Cortlandtville School is located on the northeast side of Locust Avenue in the hamlet of Van Cortlandtville. The one-acre building lot is near the central crossroads of the community. The building is a small, one-story, vernacular rural schoolhouse with Gothic Revival detailing. Constructed on a brick, crawlspace foundation, this frame building is sheathed in board and batten siding. The steeply pitched gable roof, which was originally covered with wood shingles, is currently sheathed in slate. The gable-end front has a full-width porch added in the early 20th century. Other early 20th century additions to the schoolhouse, which was originally a one-room, rectangular building, include a one-room toilet facility and a second classroom. The school once had a bell tower. The interior of the original schoolhouse consists of an entrance foyer and a single, large rectangular schoolroom. The schoolroom was oriented towers the rear of the building. Waist-high wainscoting in the classroom appears original, while built-in cabinets against the front wall may date to a circa 1920s remodeling. The classroom has been set up as it may have appeared in the late-19th century, with rows of wooden desks, a teacher’s desk in the rear, and slate blackboards on the walls. A late-19th century wood burning stone has been situated at the center of the room. The rear addition is accessed through original sliding double doors in the rear of the main building. Low vertical wainscoting is all that remains intact from the room’s original construction. The Van Cortlandtville School retains a high degree of architectural integrity.


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