White Plains Rural Cemetery Office, White Plains

Photograph by Gray Williams

Historic Properties Listing

PropertyBedford Village Historic District
MunicipalityBedford
CommunityBedford Village
Street Number
Street AddressCourt Road; Seminary Road; Poundridge Road; Greenwich Road

Historic District NameBedford Village Historic District
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status? Yes  10/02/73
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerVarious
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeOther (describe)
Building Type, Detailscommercial, public and religious
Architectural StyleOther (describe)
Architectural Style, DetailsFederal, Greek Revival, Gothic Revival
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, Detailslibrary, museum, public hall, church, offices
Original UseOther (describe)
Original Use, Detailsreligious, schools, courthouse, store
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date MovedHistorical Hall moved1837
Year Builtc.1787-1872
Structural SystemWood Frame, Interlocking Joints
Structural System, Detailsstone (school house)
Photograph Available?
AlterationsAmong the important buildings; the 1787 court house has been restored to its original form including proper windows; Historical Hall,(1806), originally a Methodist church, was moved to its present site in 1837; the interior of the stone school house (1829),once used as a museum, has been restored as a period classroom. All the buildings in the district have been painted and otherwise maintained.
Date of Alterations19th-20th centuries

SignificanceThe Bedford Village Historic District is extremely important historicall and architecturally. It is a rare example of a New York State community laid out in the colonial New England pattern of home plots and jointly owned farm land. It was an important center of resistance during the Revolutionary War serving as a Patriot supply center and the home of county government; as a consequence of which it was burned by the British in 1779. After the war the buildings discussed here were built in Federal, Greek Revival and Victorian styles reflecting the long period of time that Bedford was one of the most vital farming and trading centers in the county.
DescriptionThe Bedford Village Historic District encompasses an area laid out in 1680 by Connecticut settlers. It is perhaps unique in New York State in being designed in the common holdings pattern introduced by the first English migrants in Massachusetts. The town common, set within a triangle created by the juncture of three roads was surrounded by three acre house plots distributed by lot among the original twenty two proprietors and was adjoined by the East Field which was intended to be farmed in common. As in Massachusetts, this social and economic arrangement did not last long, but the basic form remains impressed upon the landscape. Bedford soon became an important market town surrounded by rich farms. During the Revolutionary War it was intermittently the seat of County government, and until 1870 it was one of Westchester's two county seats and the site of a county court house. Surrounding the green, which is overlooked by a cemetery dating to 1681; are several historically important buildings: the 1787 Court House, Historical Hall (1806), a former Methodist church moved to a site adjoining the cemetery in 1837, the library (1807) formerly the Bedford Academy, the c. 1838 post office, a small general store also built in 1838, a cut stone school house dating to 1829 and the Gothic style Presbyterian Church erected in 1872. Though differing somewhat in architectural style (particularly the Gothic church), these building form a harmonious whole and with the green and burying ground provide a vision of New England transferred to Westchester County. For further details as to these structures see the file held by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyCaramoor
MunicipalityBedford
CommunityKatonah
Street Number149
Street AddressGirdle Ridge Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  08/02/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  05/25/01
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  04/13/01
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerCaramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Inc.
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectChristian F. Rosborg
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleMediterranian
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsGarden, Museum, Music Facility
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1929-39
Structural SystemConcrete
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsThe wing containing three rooms and halls was added to the south façade in 1974. In the 1980s a large tent and wood flooring was added to the theatre. In 2000, a large restroom addition was made to the west end of the theatre's stage, using design elements from the main house.
Date of Alterations1974, 1980s, 2000

SignificanceCaramoor is historically significant in the area of architecture as an outstanding, unusual example of an early-20th century country estate in New York State. Designed and built over a period of ten years, from 1929 to 1939, it was conceived by financier, patron of the arts, and collector Walter Rosen and his wife Lucie. The 90-acre property has as its centerpiece a remarkable Mediterranean-inspired house designed by Rosen, in conjunction with architect Christian Rosborg and other designers, that is a veritable museum of European architectural elements and decorative arts from the 16th to the 18th centuries. The house is reminiscent of Mediterranean villas of Spain and Italy, with its stuccoed exterior walls, red-tile roofs, and central courtyard, but it is a thoroughly modern house of the 1930s with its up-to-date kitchen, numerous bathrooms, and basement garage. The house was designed with a commodious music room that was open for public performances in the 1940s. The Rosen’s donated the estate to a private foundation and in 1958 the Venetian Theater was built on the property that has become an important summer music venue for the region. Further research may reveal the importance of the Rosen’s and the festival at Caramoor for their contribution to the arts. The main house remains virtually intact since its construction and has, since 1970, been open for tours.
DescriptionCaramoor is an 80-acre property located in the town of Bedford, about three miles south of the hamlet of Katonah. A long entrance drive leads in from Girdle Ridge Road through an entrance fate with stone posts marked "Caramoor." The focal point of the property is the rambling Mediterranean Revival villa built between 1929 and 1939. The main house is virtually intact from its time of construction. It is an immense pale yellow colored stuccoed building with a red tile roof. It is mostly two stories in height and almost square in plan, with a square central courtyard (that seats 650 people) reached by a large arched opening on the south side. The house has a poured concrete foundation and walls of concrete block. Most windows are rectangular with bronze or wood frames, bordered by wooden shutters. The house is asymmetrical on all sides, with a variety of gable and hip roofs punctuated by chimneystacks. The interior of the house is designed around the courtyard- most of the rooms are connected and they are entered off the courtyard or through narrow corridors along the exterior walls. The interior of most of the house is simply finished with textured stuccoed walls, coved ceilings, and stained woodwork. The second floor has numerous bedroom suites and most of the rooms are furnished with European decorative arts. Complementing the main house are several secondary buildings that relate stylistically to the main house, landscape features such as a sunken garden and ornamental 18th century gate, and other outbuildings required to run a large estate. For more information on Caramoor and its secondary buildings, see the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyJohn Jay Homestead
MunicipalityBedford
CommunityKatonah
Street Number
Street AddressJay Street

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  07/28/72
National Historic Landmark Status? Yes  
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/23/80
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerState of New York
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectJohn Jay
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleFederal
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsMuseum
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1787
Structural SystemWood Frame, Interlocking Joints
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsPortions of the dwelling have been restored by the State of New York to the period of John Jay’s residency.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe John Jay Homestead is a landmark expressive of the ideals and commemorative of the contributions of John Jay (1745-1829), first Chief Justice of the United States. Since it was continually occupied by Jay’s descendents until 1959, the Homestead is also valuable as a reflection of the evolving taste and standards of a prominent American family.
DescriptionThe Jay Homestead is located at one of the highest points in Westchester County. The main house is placed just below the crest of the hill and commands a dramatic view of rolling land as far as the Hudson River twenty miles to the west. The farmhouse built according to John Jay’s design in 1787 was expanded as his permanent residence during the period from 1800- 1802 and was enlarged further in 1818 by the addition of the north wing and kitchen. The structure completed during Jay’s lifetime has a symmetrical plan. Recessed wings whose furthermost walls are composed of stone, flank the central block of wood frame construction with brick nogging. The central mass is five bays wide and two stories high with basement and attic. The wings, which originally housed a kitchen on the east and Jay’s office and bedroom on the west, are one story high and are two bays wide. The front door on the main façade and the door into the western wing, balanced by a false doorway on its eastern counterpart, are original to the structure. The interior doorways of the main house and some of the mantels on the second floor date to the period of Jay’s occupation. Filled with Jay family furnishings, the structure still contains some of the furniture used by John Jay and several paintings from his personal collection. Portions of the dwelling have been restored by the State of New York to the period of John Jay’s residency. Other structures on the 62-acre property include the overseer’s brick cottage, a laundry building, carriage barn, coachman’s house, wagon house, chicken house, gardener’s cottage, a sheep barn, and three other barns.


PropertyKatonah Historic District
MunicipalityBedford
CommunityKatonah
Street Number
Street AddressParkway; Vallyedge; Edgemont Road; Bedford Road

Historic District NameKatonah Historic District
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status? Yes  09/15/83
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  08/10/83
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerMultiple
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectG.S. Olmsted, B.S. Olmsted
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, DetailsReligious
Architectural StyleQueen Anne, Late Victorian
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, DetailsReligious
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, DetailsReligious
Structural ConditionGood; Fair
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site and Moved
Date Moved1895
Year BuiltVarious
Structural System
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceThe Katonah Historic District is architecturally and historically significant. The present village, in the Town of Bedford, was planned and built between 1895 and 1910. The original village, dating from 1847, was situated one mile north prior to 1890. At that time the growing population of New York City required additional water supply, and it was decided that the old Katonah site was the ideal location for what became the Mucoot Reservoir, formed by the Cornell Dam on the Croton River. When plans were finalized, citizens of the village formed the Katonah Land Company and purchased farm lands where new’ Katonah now stands. The Katonah Historic District represents both old and new aspects of the community’s development. Ten of the structures were relocated from the old village. The district’s structures are essentially intact, retained for the most part original sheathing, form, elements, and details. The structures within the district are significant reminders of the village’s early history, resettlement, development, and the present well-preserved maturity of its buildings and landscape.
DescriptionThe unincorporated hamlet of Katonah is located in the center of the northern section of Westchester County, halfway between Fairfield County and the Hudson River. The Katonah Historic District consists of thirty-eight structures on both sides of Bedford Road from the intersection of Edgemont on the north to the intersection with The Terrace and Allen Court on the south, and sections of Valley Edge, Edgemont Road, and Parkway. Although primarily residential, the district also includes three churches, two combination residential-professional office space buildings, and a few non-contributing structures. The varied topography and informally landscaped islands of green open space enhance the character of the area. Stylistically, the residences of the historic district fall into two primary categories, the Queen Anne Style and the Shingle Style. For a detailed description of each of the structures in the Katonah Historic District see the files maintained by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyMerestead - Sloane Estate
MunicipalityBedford
Community
Street Number
Street AddressByram Lake Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  01/05/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  09/27/84
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  08/23/84
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerWestchester County Department of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectDelano and Aldrich
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleGeorgian Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsPublic Park
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1907
Structural SystemMasonry Load-Bearing
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsEssentially unaltered since construction, 1906-1907
Date of Alterations

Significance Excellent, basically unaltered example the country seats established during the late 19th and early 20th centuries on Westchester properties formerly used for agriculture. It is unusual in that it retains not only the original mansion but also a dependent complex of of farm buildings which provided agricultural products for the owner's table. The manor house was designed by Delano and Aldrich, an important early 20th century New York City architectural firm and reflects the eclectic revival stlyles popular during the period.
DescriptionCountry estate with manor house and dependencies as well as associated farm complex located on 136 acres in rural central Westchester County. The main house is generally rectangular in plan, of brick with a hipped slate roof and at north and south ends porches supported by Tuscan Doric columns. Interior is built around a center hall off of which open formal living and dining rooms. A stairway at north end gives access to bedrooms. A service wing accomadates kitchen and servants' quarters. In close proximity are dependencies including a garden house, carriage house and two garages. Located at some distance from the main house is a preexisting clapboard farmhouse surrounded by stable, cow barn, storage building and four sheds creating the nucleus of a working farm.


PropertyMianus Road
MunicipalityBedford
Community
Street Number
Street AddressMillers Mill Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  08/02/88
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status?   
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status?   
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerTown of Bedford
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectN/A
Builderunknown
Building TypeN/A
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleN/A
Architectural Style, Details
Current Use
Current Use, DetailsTransportation and recreation
Original Use
Original Use, DetailsTransportation; farm to market road
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodRural woodlands, nature preserve
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1881-1890
Structural SystemN/A
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsOther than for installation of subsurface drainage culverts in the mid 20th century, this dirt road remains much as it was in the nineteenth century
Date of Alterationsc. 1945-1960

SignificanceMianus Road is the last remaining unaltered dirt road in the Town of Bedford. The absence of buildings, power lines, driveways or mailboxes allows the viewer to experience what roads and travel conditions were like before the advent of the motor car.
DescriptionThe Mianus road was dug by hand, c. 1880-1885, as a farm to market road providing access to a local grist mill for farmers in the North Castle area of Westchester County. Approximately one half mile of the original road remains in dirt without any twentieth century features such as utility poles or houses. The road, carved out of a steep hillside is bounded on the west by highland and on the east by wetlands of the Mianus River Gorge Preserve. For further details see the file held by the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyPalmer-Lewis Estate
MunicipalityBedford
Community
Street Number
Street AddressBlack Brook Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  03/25/98
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  08/06/98
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  03/25/98
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerDeena and joseph LaMotta
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

Architectunknown
Builderunknown
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleItalianate
Architectural Style, DetailsColonial Revival
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1860
Structural SystemPost-and-Beam
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsOriginal house c. 1779 was roughly square. A single bay added to west side c. 1800. Then, c. 1860, house was substantially altered in Italianate style with central hall and four rooms on first floor, five on second, a central staircase and the building completely surrounded by shed roofed porch, the west side of which was subsequentally removed. Between 1920 and 1925 Colonial Revival style alterations included an oriel window added to front facade, pairs of gabled dormers front and back and various cosmetic changes to fireplace mantels, windows, etc. Finally, in 1998, two new additions were built on the west side and the rear porch was enclosed.
Date of Alterationsc. 1800; c. 1860; c. 1900-1925, 1998

SignificanceThough substantially altered, the property represents one of the few remaining examples in Westchester County of a working farm complex having besides the main house, fifteen related outbuildings (tenant houses, carriage house, barn, chicken coop, corn crib, well house and various storage sheds) as well as remnants of an orchard and kitchen garden. It also reflects the change from subsistance farming to use as a summer residence and "hobby farm" for wealthy New York City residents. Moreover, the main house is a rare and fine example of the Italianate style popular during the mid nineteenth century.
DescriptionHouse is located on 31 acres (remnant of a 250 acre holding) off Black Brook Road in the Town of Bedford, rural-residential area of rolling hills, woods and narrow roads leading to large estate type houses. The Palmer-Lewis house, parts of which date to the late 18th century, is the center of a farming complex which was active until after World War II and consists of tenant houses, barns and various subsidiary structures. The original main house, which was probably a center chimney peaked roof cape. This building was substantially enlarged in the Italianate manner around 1860 and in the early 20th century additional changes, following the Colonial Revival taste, were made. Two additions in 1998 completed the transformation. The dependencies have seen similar changes, though the carriage house and barn are little altered from their mid 19th century appearance. For a detailed description of the property see the National Register of Historic Places registration form on file at the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyRichard H. Mandel House
MunicipalityBedford
CommunityBedford Hills
Street Number323
Street AddressHaines Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  12/13/95
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  03/09/96
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  10/13/95
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerEric and Nannette Brill
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectEdward Durell Stone
Builder
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleInternational
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1935
Structural SystemConcrete
Structural System, DetailsSteel frame
Photograph Available?
AlterationsInterior and exterior of house are essentially intact with no significant alterations. Much of original landscaping remains so that house is seen in intended context with high degree of integrity in location, setting, design and materials.
Date of Alterations

SignificanceAn extremely well preserved example of the International Style and the first commission of the well known American architect, Edward Durell Stone. Moreover, the interiors and sixty percent of the original furniture created by the interior designer Donald Desky remain intact and on site. Both men were pioneers in the development of an American International Style, and their collaboration on the Mandell house resulted in a fusion of International Style architecture with International Style interior design and furnishings.
DescriptionThe Richard Mandell house is a two story Z-shaped dwelling of concrete block, stuco and steel frame designed in the 20th century International style. It is sited on 16.93 acres of rolling, open land in rural Bedford Township,Westchester County. Though having suffered some neglect over the years, it is now (1995) being restored and remains remarkably intact as well as retaining sixty percent of its original furnishings. The flat roofed structure forms a rectilinear composition composed of several joined wings each with a specific function; intertainment, bedrooms, service and the like all unified by a dazzeling white painted stucco surface.There is little interior or exterior applied ornament, and interior lighting is indirect.


PropertySt. Luke's Episcopal Church
MunicipalityBedford
CommunityKatonah
Street Number68
Street AddressBedford Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  11/28/00
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  02/22/01
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  11/28/00
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerSt. Luke's Episcopal Church
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectHobart B. Upjohn
Builder
Building TypeReligious
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleTudor Revival
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseReligious
Current Use, Details
Original UseReligious
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionExcellent
NeighborhoodMixed Use
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1921-23
Structural SystemTimber Frame
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
Alterations
Date of Alterations

SignificanceSt. Luke's Episcopal Church is a distinctive example of the half-timbered Tudor Revival style that was popular in the United States in the 1920s. The style was common for residential design and also for secondary ecclesiastical buildings, but there are relatively few examples of half-timbered churches of the period in Westchester County. The church was designed by Hobart B. Upjohn, the son of architect Richard M. Upjohn, and grandson of Richard Upjohn, the acclaimed American church designer. St. Luke's prominent location at the corner of the two main thoroughfares, along with an enormous evergreen that serves as the community Christmas tree, have made the church a highly visible landmark and center of activity in the historic community of Katonah. The church is highly intact on the exterior and interior.
DescriptionSt. Luke's Episcopal Church, a Tudor Revival church built in 1921-23, stands like the bow of a ship on a small triangular plot facing a fork in the road at the southern entrance to the hamlet of Katonah in the town of Bedford. Bedford Road, which passes St. Luke's to the west, is a beautiful, tree-lined thoroughfare and the main street through Katonah’s nineteenth century residential historic district. The church is in a mixed-use area. The church property is flat, and sidewalks lead from the streets to the front and rear entrances to the church. There is a small parking area along Katonah Avenue. A lawn and mature foundation plantings surround the church. There is a huge spruce tree on the property as well. The church has a single story on a partial basement. The four-bay nave and polygonal apse and chancel form the primary rectangular mass of the building, although a bay for the organ on the west side and a sacristy and choir robbing area within a lower extension on the east side of the church are located where there would be a transept. The exterior is composed of a rustic stone base to the height of the windows sills, with stucco and half-timber walls above. There church is entered through a small, partially enclosed porch on the south gable end. Above the porch is a large three-part window. A diminutive, copper-clad steeple rises above the ridge of the steeply pitched slate roof over where the nave meets the chancel. The windows contain the original stained glass - diamond panes in pastel hues - with Gothic tracery at the top. A single pictorial stained glass window graces the northwest corner of the nave. The interior of the church is strikingly beautiful and simple. In harmony with the half-timber English Tudor exterior, exposed timber arches delineate the side aisles and spring from the floor to the apex of the exposed wood decking of the roof structure. The walls are white plaster with continuous dark wood trim encircling the nave and chancel at the level of the windowsills. There is a center aisle and side aisles, with two rows of simple stained wood pews. There is a small storage loft above the sacristy, and the partial (unfinished) basement contains the boiler and other utilities, and a small storage area.


PropertyStepping Stones
MunicipalityBedford
CommunityKatonah
Street Number62
Street AddressOak Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  06/03/04
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  06/14/05
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  06/03/04
Eligible for National Register?

Owner
Institutional OwnerThe Stepping Stones Foundation
Tax Map Available?Yes
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectUnknown
BuilderUnknown
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleColonial Dutch
Architectural Style, Details
Current UseOther (describe)
Current Use, DetailsMuseum
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Builtc. 1920
Structural SystemWood Frame, Interlocking Joints
Structural System, Details
Photograph Available?
AlterationsThe buildings and grounds are in very good repair and retain a high level of historic integrity; little has changed since Lois' death in 1988. The Wilson's themselves made many modifications to the grounds and buildings during their ownership. When the couple acquired Stepping Stones in 1941, it was an unfinished summerhouse. There was no furnace and the second floor rooms were not even painted. A furnace was added, the floors were refinished, the walls were painted, and a new driveway was made. An elevator was also added to the home.
Date of Alterations1941-

SignificanceStepping Stones is historically significant for its association with William Griffith (Bill) Wilson and Lois Burnham Wilson, who lived in the house from 1941 until their deaths in 1971 and 1988. Bill Wilson was a co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous and the author of four books dealing with alcoholism and his 12-step program. Bill wrote many of his books in his Studio behind the Main House at Stepping Stones. Lois Wilson was the co-founder of Al-Anon Family Groups, the self-help group for family members of alcoholics and the founder of Alateen, a group for the children of alcoholics. Al-Anon and Alateen have also grown to reach international membership, with chapters in 115 countries. Knowing the importance of Stepping Stone to the AA community, Lois built a separate building in the early 1980s to house an archives, office, and apartment and, upon her death, the property was turned over to the Stepping Stones Foundation, who operates the property as a museum. People associated with AA from all over the world come to Stepping Stones to pay homage to these two remarkable people.
DescriptionStepping Stones, the home of Bill and Lois Wilson from 1941 until 1988, is located at 62 Oak Road in Katonah in the town of Bedford. The property consists of five lots of land that total approximately 6.5 acres. The suburban setting is hilly and wooded and a small stream wings its way through a valley on the property. The property contains six buildings, all-contributing: the main residence, pump house, 1920s garage, the studio (known as "Wit's End"), 1950s garage, and the 1980s office. The buildings vary in size and construction but all are finished with the similar materials and colors to create a unified appearance: shingle siding painted brown, white-painted casings and trim, and doors painted bright blue. The main house was constructed as a summerhouse c. 1920 in the Dutch Colonial Style. The one-and-a-half story house is rectangular in plan, with porches appended to the front and rear facades. It has a fieldstone foundation and the front porch foundation is constructed of concrete masonry units. The wood framed walls are finished with wood shingles painted brown. The window openings have plain board casings, sills and drip caps and six-over-six double-hung wood sash all painted white. The gambrel roof has flared eaves and is finished with asphalt shingles. A large, stucco-finished chimney is on the roof. The main façade has four bays. The first floor contains a living room, a stone fireplace, a winding stair, front porch, kitchen, and bedrooms. Most of the second floor is a large room that was used as a library. There are also bedrooms and a bathroom. The entire interior of the house is furnished exactly as it was upon the death of Lois Wilson in 1988. For a detailed description of Stepping Stones refer to the files at the Westchester County Historical Society.


PropertyStonecrest
MunicipalityBedford
Community
Street Number703
Street AddressCroton Lake Road

Historic District Name
Local Landmark Status?Yes  12/18/03
Local Landmark District Status?   
National Register District Status?   
County Register Status?   
National Register Status? Yes  02/12/04
National Historic Landmark Status?   
National Historic Landmark District Status?   
State Register Status? Yes  12/18/03
Eligible for National Register?

OwnerRobert H. Saunders
Institutional Owner
Tax Map Available?
Tax Map Image Available?
Tax Section       Tax Block       Tax Lot

ArchitectEugene C. Gardner; H.O. Milliken (alterations)
Builderunknown
Building TypeSingle Family Dwelling
Building Type, Details
Architectural StyleOther
Architectural Style, DetailsEclectic Queene Anne, Stick and Eastlake blend
Current UseSingle Family Dwelling
Current Use, Details
Original UseSingle Family Dwelling
Original Use, Details
Structural ConditionGood
NeighborhoodResidential
Threats to Building
Site IntegrityOriginal Site
Date Moved
Year Built1879
Structural SystemWood Frame, Interlocking Joints
Structural System, Detailsstone/brick in part
Photograph Available?Yes
AlterationsIn 1916 after a change in ownership the house underwent a number of cosmetic changes inside and out. These were in the Colonial-Revival style and consisted of adding dormers, Federal trim and fireplaces as well as the conversion of various closets to powder and bath rooms, incorporating a former pantry into the original kitchen and substituting a two piece Dutch door for the original. The current owners have reversed some of these changes restoring a bit of the Victorian atmosphere.
Date of Alterations1916

SignificanceOne of a group of houses built by the Wood family and known collectively as the "Woodpile", Stonecrest is an early example (and, perhaps, the only one in New York State) of the blending of Queene Anne, Stick and Eastlake styles to create a roomy, eclectic structure reflecting the then current rural romantic vision of the country house, often complete with mini-farm. The architect, Eugene C. Gardner, was a major figure in the 19th century architectural world, and Stonecrest one of his triumphs. Moreover, the exterior remains largely unchanged, though much of the interior was subjected to Colonial Revival alterations in 1916.
DescriptionBuilt in 1879 on 3.5 acres of land (enlarged by later purchases to the current 5.33 acres) Stonecrest fronts on Croton Lake Road in the Town of Bedford, not far north of Mount Kisco. A true eclectic Victorian pile it measures 50 by 45' with an 8 x 15' indentation on the east façade. Combining elements of the Victorian Eastlake, Queene Anne and Stick styles, it is 3.5 stories high with a slate hip roof, numerous dormers and originally had a two story entry porch. The walls combine rubble stone with brick quoins at the corners, while the upper stories were of wood shingles. At the rear entry is a single story porch. The first floor interior features a central skylit stair hall or atrium off which are the living room and library, backed by a dining room and the kitchen area. In 1916 the Wood-Underhill families sold the property to the Meades who hired the New York City architect, H.O. Millikin to redo the manse in the then popular Colonial-Revival style. Though Millikin removed porches, altered windows and added dormers he left the exterior largely intact. Inside he added fireplaces and mantels in the Federal taste, turned closets into bathrooms, merged pantry with cupboard and added lots of Federal-like trim. However, the building remained stubbornly Victorian. Two other buildings of some importance are found on the property. The first is a Stick Style carriage house contemporary with the residence, the second a stone root cellar. Further information on both as well additional material on the main house can be found in the files of the Westchester County Historical Society.


Select from below to view properties associated with each municipality